Catalogue


In the eye of all trade : Bermuda, Bermudians, and the maritime Atlantic world, 1680-1783 /
Michael J. Jarvis.
imprint
Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by University of North Carolina Press, c2010.
description
684 p.
ISBN
0807833215 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807833216 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by University of North Carolina Press, c2010.
isbn
0807833215 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807833216 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: In the eye of all trade : Bermuda, Bermudians, and the maritime Atlantic world, 1680-1783 -- Colonizing paradise : the Somers Islands Company and colony -- Bermuda's turn to the sea, 1685-1715 -- Bermuda's maritime economy 1 : circumatlantic shipping and smuggling, 1715-1775 -- Bermuda's maritime economy 2 : working the Atlantic commons, 1690-1775 -- A seafaring people : Bermuda's maritime society -- Maritime migration, trade, and Atlantic families -- Navigating the American Revolution -- Epilogue: From seaport to sentry post : the decline of maritime Bermuda, 1783-1820 -- Conclusion: Fate, contingency, and the development of maritime America.
catalogue key
7098580
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In this first social history of 18th-century Bermuda, Jarvis takes readers aboard small Bermudian sloops and follows white and enslaved sailors in an expansive maritime sphere spanning Great Britain's North American and Caribbean colonies. He shows how humble sailors and seafaring slaves operating small family-owned vessels were significant but underappreciated agents of Atlantic integration. Jarvis argues that the American Revolution shattered interregional links that Bermudians had helped to forge and ultimately doomed the island's maritime economy.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The journey this book has undertaken leaves the reader contemplating the possibilities of studying other locations in this manner. If every scholar of the Atlantic world took this approach, imagine what new wonders might be uncovered." - Sehepunkte
"This impressive book-the author's first monograph-offers a convincing interpretation of the socio-economic and maritime history of Britain's oldest and smallest colony....Jarvis jumps from pawn to bishop among maritime historians." - American Historical Review
"This masterly study....the result of 20 years of research, is confidently written and structured." - Journal for Maritime Research
"Jarvis's choice of perspective is truly inspired. . . . Having spent twenty years painstakingly researching colonial Bermuda, Jarvis has produced a wonderfully written narrative history worthy of its lengthy gestation." -- Common-Place
"Jarvis's choice of perspective is truly inspired. . . . Having spent twenty years painstakingly researching colonial Bermuda, Jarvis has produced a wonderfully written narrative history worthy of its lengthy gestation." --Common-Place
"Jarvis has written a brilliant interdisciplinary study of Atlantic history, describing the pivotal role the island of Bermuda played in the development of that world. With clear prose buoyed by extensive notation, Jarvis elucidates the unique nature of the island. . . . This well-written and thoughtful history guides the reader on a voyage that traverses the Atlantic, colonial, and maritime historical worlds, simultaneously making this a captivatingly broad, yet focused, volume." - Sea History
"Jarvis paints a detailed portrait of Bermudian society, successfully melding a demographic study with a more cultural discussion of patterns of consumption, fashion, and architecture. . . . [This book] is a significant addition to the burgeoning scholarship in the field and ought to be essential reading for everyone interested in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world." - New West Indian Guide
"Everyone who is interested in the history of British colonies in the Atlantic, North America and the Caribbean should read this fine book. . . . This is Atlantic history at its best." - Anglican and Episcopal History
"Jarvis delicately situates the details of the Bermudian history within this Atlantic sweep, thereby crafting a book that is finely calibrated. . . . Should be required reading for Atlantic scholars. . . . Jarvis' theme of self-organization . . . will keep scholars busily debating for decades." - Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"[A] superb and rewarding book….The engaging prose of this attractively presented book …provides the close correlation of transatlantic connections with internal developments often missing from the Atlantic perspective." - The Journal of American History
"[A] superb and rewarding book .The engaging prose of this attractively presented book provides the close correlation of transatlantic connections with internal developments often missing from the Atlantic perspective." - The Journal of American History
"[A] superb and rewarding book'_¦.The engaging prose of this attractively presented book '_¦provides the close correlation of transatlantic connections with internal developments often missing from the Atlantic perspective." - The Journal of American History
"An important book. . . . In the Eye of All Trade makes a significant contribution to Atlantic history." - International Journal of Maritime History
"[An] impressive achievement in bringing Bermuda's maritime world to life." - William and Mary Quarterly
"A remarkably through study of Bermuda's place in the Atlantic world in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and a fascinating social history of the creative and distinctive maritime culture that emerged there. . . . While extraordinarily detailed, it is also a joy to read. Jarvis' writing is clear, concise and expertly-crafted." -PhiloBiblos
"An engaging and multidisciplinary study that. . . . will serve as a model. . . . for Atlantic historians and those interested in the history of colonial Bermuda." - South Carolina Historical Magazine
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In an exploration of the oceanic connections of the Atlantic world, Michael J. Jarvis recovers a mariner's view of early America as seen through the eyes of Bermuda's seafarers. The first social history of eighteenth-century Bermuda, this book profiles how one especially intensive maritime community capitalized on its position "in the eye of all trade." Jarvis takes readers aboard small Bermudian sloops and follows white and enslaved sailors as they shuttled cargoes between ports, raked salt, harvested timber, salvaged shipwrecks, hunted whales, captured prizes, and smuggled contraband in an expansive maritime sphere spanning Great Britain's North American and Caribbean colonies. In doing so, he shows how humble sailors and seafaring slaves operating small family-owned vessels were significant but underappreciated agents of Atlantic integration. The American Revolution starkly revealed the extent of British America's integration before 1775 as it shattered interregional links that Bermudians had helped to forge. Reliant on North America for food and customers, Bermudians faced disaster at the conflict's start. A bold act of treason enabled islanders to continue trade with their rebellious neighbors and helped them to survive and even prosper in an Atlantic world at war. Ultimately, however, the creation of the United States ended Bermuda's economic independence and doomed the island's maritime economy.
Main Description
In an exploration of the oceanic connections of the Atlantic world, Michael J. Jarvis recovers a mariner's view of early America as seen through the eyes of Bermuda's seafarers. The first social history of eighteenth-century Bermuda, this book profiles how one especially intensive maritime community capitalized on its position "in the eye of all trade." 9; Jarvis takes readers aboard small Bermudian sloops and follows white and enslaved sailors as they shuttled cargoes between ports, raked salt, harvested timber, salvaged shipwrecks, hunted whales, captured prizes, and smuggled contraband in an expansive maritime sphere spanning Great Britain's North American and Caribbean colonies. In doing so, he shows how humble sailors and seafaring slaves operating small family-owned vessels were significant but underappreciated agents of Atlantic integration. 9; The American Revolution starkly revealed the extent of British America's integration before 1775 as it shattered interregional links that Bermudians had helped to forge. Reliant on North America for food and customers, Bermudians faced disaster at the conflict's start. A bold act of treason enabled islanders to continue trade with their rebellious neighbors and helped them to survive and even prosper in an Atlantic world at war. Ultimately, however, the creation of the United States ended Bermuda's economic independence and doomed the island's maritime economy. In an exploration of the oceanic connections of the Atlantic world, Michael J. Jarvis recovers a mariner's view of early America as seen through the eyes of Bermuda's seafarers. The first social history of eighteenth-century Bermuda, this book profiles how one especially intensive maritime community capitalized on its position "in the eye of all trade." 9; Jarvis takes readers aboard small Bermudian sloops and follows white and enslaved sailors as they shuttled cargoes between ports, raked salt, harvested timber, salvaged shipwrecks, hunted whales, captured prizes, and smuggled contraband in an expansive maritime sphere spanning Great Britain's North American and Caribbean colonies. In doing so, he shows how humble sailors and seafaring slaves operating small family-owned vessels were significant but underappreciated agents of Atlantic integration. 9; 9;

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