Catalogue


Prudence and pressure : reproduction and human agency in Europe and Asia, 1700-1900 /
Noriko O. Tsuya ... [et al.].
imprint
Cambridge, MA : MIT Press, c2010.
description
xxv, 380 p.
ISBN
0262013525 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780262013529 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, MA : MIT Press, c2010.
isbn
0262013525 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780262013529 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Simplicity and complexity / James Z. Lee, Tommy Bengtsson, Cameron Campbell -- Previous paradigms and new models / James Z. Lee, Wang Feng, Noriko O. Tsuya -- Reproduction : models and sources / Noriko O. Tsuya, Cameron Campbell, Wang Feng -- Household organization, coresident kin, and reproduction / Wang Feng ... [et al.] -- Economic stress and reproductive responses / Tommy Bengtsson and Martin Dribe -- Child control as a reproductive strategy / Renzo Derosas and Noriko O. Tsuya -- Agency, social class, and fertility in southern Sweden, 1766-1865 / Tommy Bengtsson and Martin Dribe -- Economic change and differential fertility in rural eastern Belgium, 1812-1875 / George Alter, Muriel Neven, Michel Oris -- Patterns of reproductive behavior in preindustrial Italy : Casalguidi 1819-1859 and Venice 1850-1869 / Marco Breschi ... [et al.] -- Family, household, and reproduction in two northeastern Japanese villages, 1716-1870 / Noriko O. Tsuya and Satomi Kurosu -- Agency, hierarchies, and reproduction in northeastern China, 1789-1840 / Wang Feng, Cameron Campbell, James Z. Lee -- Differences and similarities : towards a comparative historical social science / James Z. Lee, Wang Feng, Noriko O. Tsuya.
catalogue key
7098384
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-09-01:
This collaborative study by a large team of international scholars is an impressive advance in demographic history. Following up on their 2004 volume on mortality (Life under Pressure, by Tommy Bengtsson et al., CH, Nov'04, 42-1712), the authors use sophisticated quantitative methodologies to analyze similar household data on births and families in five villages in Sweden, Belgium, Italy, Japan, and China. The larger aim is to reevaluate long-standing debates on preindustrial families in Europe and Asia. Excellent analysis of villages in southern Sweden and eastern Belgian confirms the European nuclear family model for restraining population growth. Couples in northwestern Europe married late, set up independent households, produced children at a high natural rate, and showed no sex preference for their offspring. However, findings for Asia challenge the existing scholarship. The authors show that human decisions, as opposed to famines and epidemics, limited the number and sex composition in multigenerational Japanese and Chinese families. Kinship patterns, gender, sex preference, and socially accepted infanticide were among the many factors affecting fertility outcomes. This outstanding work realizes the promise of large-scale, collectively written social science history. Too difficult for undergraduates and general readers, this study is indispensable for faculty and research libraries. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate students, faculty, and research collections. J. P. McKay University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This volume tackles the thorniest issue in comparative demography -- what factors govern reproduction rates and practices in different societies? The authors provide not only the widest range of empirical data on this topic available in a single volume, but a theoretically sophisticated causal analysis that identifies the essential features of Asian and European practices, and their critical similarities and differences. This work marks a major step forward in the science of comparative demography, and must be addressed by every demographer, economic historian, and world historian." -- Jack A. Goldstone, George Mason University
"This striking comparative historical study examines the reproductive response to both short-term and long-term economic stress in different regional and cultural settings. It is an outstanding successor to Life Under Pressure." -Ronald Lee, Professor of Economics and Demography, University of California, Berkeley
"This volume tackles the thorniest issue in comparative demography-what factors govern reproduction rates and practices in different societies? The authors provide not only the widest range of empirical data on this topic available in a single volume, but a theoretically sophisticated causal analysis that identifies the essential features of Asian and European practices, and their critical similarities and differences. This work marks a major step forward in the science of comparative demography, and must be addressed by every demographer, economic historian, and world historian." -Jack A. Goldstone, George Mason University
"This striking comparative historical study examines the reproductive response to both short-term and long-term economic stress in different regional and cultural settings. It is an outstanding successor to Life Under Pressure."--Ronald Lee, Professor of Economics and Demography, University of California, Berkeley
"This striking comparative historical study examines the reproductive response to both short-term and long-term economic stress in different regional and cultural settings. It is an outstanding successor to Life Under Pressure ." - Ronald Lee , Professor of Economics and Demography, University of California, Berkeley
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
This pioneering study reconceptualizes the impact of social organizations, economic conditions, and human agency on human reproduction in preindustrial communities in Europe and Asia. Unlike previous studies, in which Asia is meeasured by European standards, Prudence and Pressuredevelops a Eurasian perspective. Drawing on rich new data and the tools of event-history analysis, the authors challenge the accepted Eurocentric Malthusian view that attributes "prudence" (smaller families due to late marriage) to the preindustrial West and "pressure" (high mortality due to overpopulation) to the East, showing instead important similarities between Europe and Asia in human motivation and population behavior. The authors analyze age, gender, family and household, kinship, social class and power, religion, culture, and economic resources in order to compare reproductive strategies and outcomes. They reveal underlying similarities between East and West in two major components of the reproductive regime-marriage and childbearing-and offer evidence showing that preindustrial reproduction was motivated and governed by human agency at least as much as by human biology. Prudence and Pressureis part of a large-scale interdisciplinary effort to use new data and methods to re-examine the Malthusian paradigm of population growth. It represents a significant advance in the fields of historical demography, history, and sociology. Eurasian Population and Family History series
Main Description
This pioneering study reconceptualizes the impact of social organizations, economic conditions, and human agency on human reproduction in preindustrial communities in Europe and Asia. Unlike previous studies, in which Asia is meeasured by European standards, Prudence and Pressure develops a Eurasian perspective. Drawing on rich new data and the tools of event-history analysis, the authors challenge the accepted Eurocentric Malthusian view that attributes "prudence" (smaller families due to late marriage) to the preindustrial West and "pressure" (high mortality due to overpopulation) to the East, showing instead important similarities between Europe and Asia in human motivation and population behavior. The authors analyze age, gender, family and household, kinship, social class and power, religion, culture, and economic resources in order to compare reproductive strategies and outcomes. They reveal underlying similarities between East and West in two major components of the reproductive regime--marriage and childbearing--and offer evidence showing that preindustrial reproduction was motivated and governed by human agency at least as much as by human biology. Prudence and Pressure is part of a large-scale interdisciplinary effort to use new data and methods to re-examine the Malthusian paradigm of population growth. It represents a significant advance in the fields of historical demography, history, and sociology.
Main Description
This pioneering study reconceptualizes the impact of social organizations, economic conditions, and human agency on human reproduction in preindustrial communities in Europe and Asia. Unlike previous studies, in which Asia is measured by European standards, Prudence and Pressuredevelops a Eurasian perspective. Drawing on rich new data and the tools of event-history analysis, the authors challenge the accepted Eurocentric Malthusian view that attributes "prudence" (smaller families due to late marriage) to the preindustrial West and "pressure" (high mortality due to overpopulation) to the East, showing instead important similarities between Europe and Asia in human motivation and population behavior. The authors analyze age, gender, family and household, kinship, social class and power, religion, culture, and economic resources in order to compare reproductive strategies and outcomes. They reveal underlying similarities between East and West in two major components of the reproductive regime-marriage and childbearing-and offer evidence showing that preindustrial reproduction was motivated and governed by human agency at least as much as by human biology. Prudence and Pressureis part of a large-scale interdisciplinary effort to use new data and methods to re-examine the Malthusian paradigm of population growth. It represents a significant advance in the fields of historical demography, history, and sociology. Eurasian Population and Family History series
Main Description
This pioneering study reconceptualizes the impact of social organizations, economic conditions, and human agency on human reproduction in preindustrial communities in Europe and Asia. Unlike previous studies, in which Asia is measured by European standards, Prudence and Pressure develops a Eurasian perspective. Drawing on rich new data and the tools of event-history analysis, the authors challenge the accepted Eurocentric Malthusian view that attributes "prudence" (smaller families due to late marriage) to the preindustrial West and "pressure" (high mortality due to overpopulation) to the East, showing instead important similarities between Europe and Asia in human motivation and population behavior. The authors analyze age, gender, family and household, kinship, social class and power, religion, culture, and economic resources in order to compare reproductive strategies and outcomes. They reveal underlying similarities between East and West in two major components of the reproductive regime-marriage and childbearing-and offer evidence showing that preindustrial reproduction was motivated and governed by human agency at least as much as by human biology. Prudence and Pressure is part of a large-scale interdisciplinary effort to use new data and methods to re-examine the Malthusian paradigm of population growth. It represents a significant advance in the fields of historical demography, history, and sociology. Eurasian Population and Family History series
Bowker Data Service Summary
This pioneering study reconceptualizes the impact of social organizations, economic conditions, and human agency on human reproduction in preindustrial communities in Europe and Asia.
Table of Contents
List of Tables, Figures, and Mapsp. vii
Contributorsp. xvii
Series Forewordp. xix
Acknowledgmentsp. xxiii
Contexts and Models
Simplicity and Complexityp. 3
Previous Paradigms and New Modelsp. 23
Reproduction: Models and Sourcesp. 39
Comparative Geographies
Household Organization, Co-resident Kin, and Reproductionp. 67
Economic Stress and Reproductive Responsesp. 97
Child Control as a Reproductive Strategyp. 129
Local Histories
Agency, Social Class, and Fertility in Southern Sweden, 1766 to 1865p. 159
Economic Change and Differential Fertility in Rural Eastern Belgium, 1812 to 1875p. 195
Patterns of Reproductive Behavior in Preindustrial Italyp. 217
Casalguidi, 1819 to 1859, and Venice, 1850 to 1869
Family, Household, and Reproduction in Northeastern Japan, 1716 to 1870p. 249
Agency, Hierarchies, and Reproduction in Northeastern China, 1789 to 1840p. 287
Conclusion
Differences and Similaritiesp. 319
Toward a Comparative Historical Social Science
Referencesp. 329
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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