Catalogue


Sodometries : Renaissance texts, modern sexualities /
Jonathan Goldberg
imprint
New York : Fordham University Press, 2010.
description
xvi, 295 p.
ISBN
0823232212 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780823232215 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Fordham University Press, 2010.
isbn
0823232212 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780823232215 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7093462
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jonathan Goldberg is Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor at Emory University. His most recent book is the Seeds of Things (Fordham, 2009).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-06:
Sometimes the whole is better than its parts, but the reverse is true of Goldberg's attempts to deal with modern and Renaissance notions about sodomy, or sodometry, as he terms it. The three divisions of the book have a common theme, the ambivalence of Renaissance and modern views of sodomy. The various divisions add considerably to our understanding of Spencer's Colin, Shakespeare's Hal, and William Bradford's Plymouth Plantation. However, the argument that attempts to tie these strands together does not bind them convincingly. Relying heavily on Michel Foucault's History of Sexuality and demonstrating command of a wide body of criticism from William Empson to Stephen Greenblatt (Renaissance Self-Fashioning, CH, May'81) and Lisa Jardine (Still Harping on Daughters, CH, Dec'83), Goldberg is particularly effective in his discussion of Henry IV, Part 1. His attempts to link Renaissance ideas about sodomites to contemporary attacks on Saddam Hussein and the US Supreme Court seem highly speculative and less convincing. Beautifully printed, the volume contains well-chosen illustrations and an excellent index. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. R. H. Peake; Clinch Valley College of the University of Virginia
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œA classic in queer theory and in new historicist accounts of the renaissance.''”Janet Halley, Harvard University
"A classic in queer theory and in new historicist accounts of the renaissance."--Janet Halley, Harvard University
'œSodometrieshas decisively shaped work in the history of sexuality for the last decade and remains a critical text for this developing field. . . . Goldberg's work is already a classic and has not been superseded.''”Karen Newman, New York University
" Sodometries has decisively shaped work in the history of sexuality for the last decade and remains a critical text for this developing field. . . . Goldberg's work is already a classic and has not been superseded."--Karen Newman, New York University
"Sodometrieshas decisively shaped work in the history of sexuality for the last decade and remains a critical text for this developing field. . . . Goldberg's work is already a classic and has not been superseded."--Karen Newman, New York University
'œSodometriesis a stunning book: The complexity of its intelligence and the beauty of its stylistic accomplishments take one's breath away.''”Journal of the History of Sexuality
" Sodometries is a stunning book: The complexity of its intelligence and the beauty of its stylistic accomplishments take one's breath away."-- Journal of the History of Sexuality
"Sodometriesis a stunning book: The complexity of its intelligence and the beauty of its stylistic accomplishments take one's breath away."--Journal of the History of Sexuality
Sodometries is a stunning book: the complexity of its intelligence and the beauty of its stylistic accomplishments take one's breath away.- Sodometries has decisively shaped work in the history of sexuality for thelast decade and remains a critical text for this developing field . . . Goldberg's work is already a classic and has not been superceded.-Karen Newman A classic in queer theory and in new historicist accounts of the renaissance.-Janet Halley
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"At the very cutting edge of its field, an indispensable guide to the sexuality of the world that preceded our own"--Alan J. M. Bray"Sodometries is a stunning book: the complexity of its intelligence and the beauty of its stylistic accomplishments take one's breath away."--Journal of the History of Sexuality
Main Description
This book is about representations of sodomy. While most of the texts it considers are literary-works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Spenser, among others-it is framed by political considerations, notably the 1986 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bowers v. Hardwick that denied any constitutional right to private consensual acts that the court termed "homosexual sodomy" and the rhetoric attaching sodomy to Saddam Hussein in the first Gulf War. Book jacket.
Main Description
This book is about representations of sodomy. While most of the texts it considers are literary - works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, among others - it is framed by political considerations, notably the 1986 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bowers v. Hardwick that denied any constitutionalact to private consensual acts that the court termed 'homosexual sodomy' and the rhetoric attaching sodomy to Saddam Hussein in the initial U.S. war in Iraq.The book takes as axiomatic Foucault's description of sodomy as 'that utterly confused category.' Without collapsing questions of historical difference, it works to articulate relations between the early modern period and our own, between a time before the homo/heterosexual divide and the modernregimes that assume it. In this book, sodometries (a Renaissance word for 'sodomy' chosen for its nonce-word suggestiveness) are sites of complications around definitions of sex and gender. Because 'sodomy' is not a term capable of singular definition, representations of sodomy are never direct.Sodomy exists only relationally.Three social domains for textual production are explored in this book: the sixteenth-century English court as the location of high literariness; the theater, especially as a site for controversy around cross-dressing; the New World as the place where the slaughter of native populations (and, in NewEngland, of Englishmen as well) was carried out in the name of ridding the hemisphere of sodomites. These lethal impulses are read as foundational for a U.S. imaginary still operative in many powerful quarters.The analyses of literary texts engage the most advanced work in early modern literary criticism (that done by feminist and New Historicist critics) and proposes a queer perspective that necessarily complicates and enriches such inquiries. Besides offering detailed readings of literary texts notoften read in terms of the history of sexuality (Shakespeare's history plays, for example), the book also examines narratives of the conquest and colonization of the Americas.
Main Description
This book is about representations of sodomy. While most of the texts it considers are literary-works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser, among others-it is framed by political considerations, notably the 1986 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bowers v. Hardwick that denied any constitutional act to private consensual acts that the court termed 'homosexual sodomy' and the rhetoric attaching sodomy to Saddam Hussein in the initial U.S. war in Iraq.The book takes as axiomatic Foucault's description of sodomy as 'that utterly confused category.' Without collapsing questions of historical difference, it works to articulate relations between the early modern period and our own, between a time before the homo/heterosexual divide and the modern regimes that assume it. In this book, sodometries (a Renaissance word for 'sodomy' chosen for its nonce-word suggestiveness) are sites of complications around definitions of sex and gender. Because 'sodomy' is not a term capable of singular definition, representations of sodomy are never direct. Sodomy exists only relationally.Three social domains for textual production are explored in this book: the sixteenth-century English court as the location of high literariness; the theater, especially as a site for controversy around cross-dressing; the New World as the place where the slaughter of native populations (and, in New England, of Englishmen as well) was carried out in the name of ridding the hemisphere of sodomites. These lethal impulses are read as foundational for a U.S. imaginary still operative in many powerful quarters.The analyses of literary texts engage the most advanced work in early modern literary criticism (that done by feminist and New Historicist critics) and proposes a queer perspective that necessarily complicates and enriches such inquiries. Besides offering detailed readings of literary texts not often read in terms of the history of sexuality (Shakespeare's history plays, for example), the book also examines narratives of the conquest and colonization of the Americas.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xv
Introduction: "That Utterly Confused Category"p. 1
"Wee/Men": Gender and Sexuality in the Formations of Elizabethan High Literariness
The Making of Courtly Makersp. 29
Spenser's Familiar Lettersp. 63
"Play the Sodomites, or Worse": The Elizabethan Theater
The Transvestite Stage: More on the Case of Christopher Marlowep. 105
Desiring Halp. 145
"They are all Sodomites": The new world
Discovering Americap. 179
Bradford's "Ancient Members" and "A Case of Buggery...Amongst Them"p. 223
Tailpiece: From William Bradford to William Buckleyp. 247
Notesp. 253
Indexp. 289
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem