Catalogue


Masculinity and the metropolis of vice, 1550-1650 /
edited by Amanda Bailey and Roze Hentschell.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
vi, 230 p.
ISBN
0230623662 (alk. paper), 9780230623668 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230623662 (alk. paper)
9780230623668 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
7092669
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Amanda Bailey is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Connecticut. She is the author of Flannting: Style and the Subversive Male Body is Renaissance England. She has published essays on early modern male youth culture and the theater and more recently on early modern ideas of property and possession. Roze Hentschell is Associate Professor of English at Colorado State University. She is the author of The Culture of Cloth is Early Modern England. Textual Constructions of a National Identity.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Masculinity and the Metropolis of Vice, 1550-1650offers a new account of the pleasures and dangers of early modern London. Instead of focusing on moralist diatribe, the essays collected here consider the mostly masculine culture of drinking, gaming, play-going, rioting, violence, and sex that shaped the urban subject in the century during which London's population and its geography expanded exponentially. By focusing on the social spaces in which vice took place--from the central aisle of St. Paul's to barbers' shops and bawdy houses, these essays draw on the work of cultural geographers as well as social historians to revise rigid patriarchal narratives and help us rethink early modern masculinity. A well-chosen collection useful for both teaching and research."--Karen Newman, Professor of English, New York University
"The range of plays from which the authors draw their evidence is admirable, as are the connections they make to non-dramatic literature...Mary Bly, in one of the volume's standout essays, provides the best treatment I have encountered of the practices of space in St. Paul's Cathedral, and the cultural meanings of those practices." - Renaissance Quarterly
" Masculinity and the Metropolis of Vice, 1550-1650 offers a new account of the pleasures and dangers of early modern London. Instead of focusing on moralist diatribe, the essays collected here consider the mostly masculine culture of drinking, gaming, play-going, rioting, violence, and sex that shaped the urban subject in the century during which London's population and its geography expanded exponentially. By focusing on the social spaces in which vice took place--from the central aisle of St. Paul's to barbers' shops and bawdy houses, these essays draw on the work of cultural geographers as well as social historians to revise rigid patriarchal narratives and help us rethink early modern masculinity. A well-chosen collection useful for both teaching and research."--Karen Newman, Professor of English, New York University
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Summaries
Main Description
Leading authors in the field of early modern studies explore a range of bad behaviors - like binge drinking, dicing, and procuring prostitutes at barbershops - in order to challenge the notion that early modern London was a corrupt city that ruined innocent young men.
Main Description
This volume offers a unique historical perspective on the ways that everyday life in early modern London both challenged and constituted manhood. Through the close examination of literary texts, primary sources, and the material artifacts of urbanity, leading authors in the field of early modern studies explore a range of bad behaviors--binge drinking at taverns, dicing at gaming houses, and procuring prostitutes at barbershops--in order to challenge the notion that a corrupt city ruined innocent young men. This collection shows that alternative modes of manhood radically revised the emotional, imaginative, and cultural geographies of London.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Series Editors' Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Gendered Geographies of Vicep. 1
Redefining Urban Masculinity: Taverns, Universities, and Gaming Houses
Manly Drunkenness: Binge Drinking as Disciplined Playp. 21
University of Vice: Drink, Gentility, and Masculinity in Oxford, Cambridge, and Londonp. 45
The Social Stakes of Gambling in Early Modern Londonp. 67
Sexualizing the City: Cathedrals, Brothels, and Barbershops
Carnal Geographies: Mocking and Mapping the Religious Bodyp. 89
"To what bawdy house doth your Maister belong?": Barbers, Bawds, and Vice in the Early Modern London Barbershopp. 115
Remapping Misconduct: Sewers, Shops, and Streets
Coriolanus and the "rank-scented meinie": Smelling Rank in Early Modern Londonp. 139
Vicious Objects: Staging False Waresp. 161
City of Angels: Theatrical Vice and The Devil is an Assp. 185
Afterword: A Question of Moralityp. 205
Contributorsp. 217
Indexp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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