Catalogue


The communion of women : missions and gender in colonial Africa and the British metropole /
Elizabeth E. Prevost.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
x, 312 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199570744, 9780199570744
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0199570744
9780199570744
contents note
Introduction: Missionary feminism -- Pt. I. Encountering gender and Christianity in the African mission field. The pedagogy of protection : female education in Madagascar, 1867-1901 -- Beyond baptism : the politics of conversion in Uganda, 1895-1907 -- Christianizing womanhood in Madagascar, 1901-1923 -- Christianizing womanhood in Uganda, 1910-1930 -- Pt. II. Evangelizing and emancipating the metropole. Rethinking Christianity and colonialism in the wake of total war -- Feminizing church and state : mission Christianity and gender politics, 1910-1928 -- Globalizing Christian 'sisterhood', 1900-1930.
catalogue key
7081353
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [294]-306) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Elizabeth Prevost looks at missionaries as the products as well as the agents of the globalization of Christianity, during a time of rapid change at the local, regional, and international level. Anglican women in Madagascar, Uganda, and the British metropole form the basis for this story. Using a rich and largely untapped base of archival and published sources, and encompassing a wide scope of geographical, social, political, and theological contexts, Prevost brings together the fine grain and the broad strokes of the global interconnections of Christianity and feminism.
Reviews
Review Quotes
A meticulously researched, closely written and intriguing book.
"A meticulously researched, closely written and intriguing book...makes for demanding but also rewarding reading...beautifully produced and the copy-editing refreshingly good." --British Scholar
"A meticulously researched, closely written and intriguing book...makes for demanding but also rewarding reading...beautifully produced and the copy-editing refreshingly good." --British Scholar Prevost reminds readers in her preface that "the Anglican world has always been a site of contested spiritual and moral authority, and those contests have complex histories" (p. vi). This book admirably draws out these tensions and shows how rich, diverse, and complicated Anglican history has been, among Britons as among Africans." --American Historical Review
"A meticulously researched, closely written and intriguing book...makes for demanding but also rewarding reading...beautifully produced and the copy-editing refreshingly good." --British Scholar Prevost reminds readers in her preface that "the Anglican world has always been a site of contested spiritual and moral authority, and those contests have complex histories" (p. vi). This book admirably draws out these tensions and shows how rich, diverse, and complicated Anglican history has been, among Britons as among Africans." --American Historical Review "Overall, this well-written and coherently structured book should prove an invaluable resource for scholars concerned with exploring the links between missions and empire, women and religion, and feminism and imperialism. It combines detailed empirical research with sophisticated analysis to make effective and original interventions into several key areas of current scholarly debate in the field of British studies." --Journal of British Studies
"This important book contributes to growing body of scholarship which complicates our understanding of women's historical relationship to Christianity...[A] meticulous, well-written, and beautifully produced book." --Victorian Studies "A meticulously researched, closely written and intriguing book...makes for demanding but also rewarding reading...beautifully produced and the copy-editing refreshingly good." --British Scholar Prevost reminds readers in her preface that "the Anglican world has always been a site of contested spiritual and moral authority, and those contests have complex histories" (p. vi). This book admirably draws out these tensions and shows how rich, diverse, and complicated Anglican history has been, among Britons as among Africans." --American Historical Review "Overall, this well-written and coherently structured book should prove an invaluable resource for scholars concerned with exploring the links between missions and empire, women and religion, and feminism and imperialism. It combines detailed empirical research with sophisticated analysis to make effective and original interventions into several key areas of current scholarly debate in the field of British studies." --Journal of British Studies
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of British women left home to follow a call to the African mission field. Women's involvement in Protestant foreign missions during this time grew out of organized efforts to professionalize women's social services, to promote white women's distinct ability to emancipate 'heathen' women, and to consolidate the religious framework of the British Empire. Motivated women could therefore pursue their vocation in a skilled,independent capacity, confident in the transformative power of the gospel and its institutional counterparts: the Christian home, school, and clinic. Yet women's missions did not transplant British paradigms easily onto African soil. Instead, missionary women encountered competing forms of culture and knowledge that caused them to approach evangelism as a series of negotiations and to rethink preconceived notions of race, gender, and religion. The outcome was a feminized, collaborative framework of Christianity which fostered new opportunities for solidarity and authority among British and African women. So powerful were these individualencounters that they decentred collective representations of empire, patriarchy, progress, and 'civilization.' Missionaries accordingly focused their attentions not only on the overseas mission field, but on the British state and church as sites of regeneration, emancipation, and reform, attemptingto build a corporate body around women's Christian authority that would ameliorate the trauma of imperialism and war.Elizabeth Prevost looks at missionaries as the products as well as the agents of the globalization of Christianity, during a time of rapid change at the local, regional, and international level. Anglican women in Madagascar, Uganda, and the British metropole form the basis for this story. Using a rich and largely untapped base of archival and published sources, and encompassing a wide scope of geographical, social, political, and theological contexts, Prevost brings together the fine grainand the broad strokes of the global interconnections of Christianity and feminism.
Main Description
Elizabeth Prevost examines the massive Protestant campaign of female missionary expansion between the 1860s and 1930s, through a comparison of Anglican women's experience in Uganda and Madigascar. She explores the impact of these women's endeavours on the women themselves, the mission contexts in which they worked, and on the British church and society from which they came and to which most returned. She argues that the large-scale involvement of women in missionwork contributed to a 'missionary feminism' that relied on 'feminized discourse of spirituality', and that this had a widespread and long-lasting impact.
Main Description
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of British women left home to follow a call to the African mission field. Women's involvement in Protestant foreign missions during this time grew out of organized efforts to professionalize women's social services, to promotewhite women's distinct ability to emancipate 'heathen' women, and to consolidate the religious framework of the British Empire. Motivated women could therefore pursue their vocation in a skilled, independent capacity, confident in the transformative power of the gospel and its institutionalcounterparts: the Christian home, school, and clinic. Yet women's missions did not transplant British paradigms easily onto African soil. Instead, missionary women encountered competing forms of culture and knowledge that caused them to approach evangelism as a series of negotiations and to rethink preconceived notions of race, gender, and religion.The outcome was a feminized, collaborative framework of Christianity which fostered new opportunities for solidarity and authority among British and African women. So powerful were these individual encounters that they decentred collective representations of empire, patriarchy, progress, and'civilization.' Missionaries accordingly focused their attentions not only on the overseas mission field, but on the British state and church as sites of regeneration, emancipation, and reform, attempting to build a corporate body around women's Christian authority that would ameliorate the traumaof imperialism and war.Elizabeth Prevost looks at missionaries as the products as well as the agents of the globalization of Christianity, during a time of rapid change at the local, regional, and international level. Anglican women in Madagascar, Uganda, and the British metropole form the basis for this story. Using arich and largely untapped base of archival and published sources, and encompassing a wide scope of geographical, social, political, and theological contexts, Prevost brings together the fine grain and the broad strokes of the global interconnections of Christianity and feminism.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. xi
List of Abbreviationsp. xii
Introduction: Missionary Feminismp. 1
Rethinking empire, Christianity, and feminismp. 5
Anglican women in Britain, Madagascar, and Ugandap. 10
Reading sources, interpreting encountersp. 20
Encountering Gender and Christianity in the African Mission Field
The Pedagogy of Protection: Female Education in Madagascar, 1867-1901p. 31
The ideology of female protectionismp. 35
The politics of mission educationp. 44
Controlling belief and practicep. 53
Anglican missions and colonial societyp. 65
Towards the professionalization of female evangelismp. 75
Beyond Baptism: The Politics of Conversion in Uganda, 1895-1907p. 83
The uses and limits of conversion: Anglican Christianity in a colonial contextp. 87
The terms and meanings of female Christianizationp. 93
Mediating the Wordp. 100
Gender, professional authority, and indigenous Christianityp. 110
Christianizing Womanhood in Madagascar, 1901-1923p. 120
Building a family of womenp. 123
Feminizing evangelistic authorityp. 129
Ritualizing motherhoodp. 140
The contested 'fellowship of womanhood'p. 145
Christianizing Womanhood in Uganda, 1910-1930p. 156
Maternal Christianityp. 157
Rethinking the 'sanctity of marriage'p. 169
Reinventing evangelical authorityp. 183
Counter-cultural evangelismp. 189
Evangelizing and Emancipating The Metropole
Rethinking Christianity and Colonialism in the Wake of Total Warp. 199
Christian internationalismp. 204
'All one in Christ Jesus': decolonizing British Christianityp. 209
Regeneration and womanhoodp. 219
Feminizing Church and State: Mission Christianity and Gender Politics, 1910-1928p. 227
Christianizing the imperial body politicp. 230
Christianizing the body spiritualp. 239
Globalizing Christian 'Sisterhood', 1900-1930p. 260
From temporal to spiritual empirep. 262
Linking centre and peripheryp. 267
Solidarity and division in the missionary Mothers' Unionp. 275
'A great chain of prayer going all round the world'p. 282
Conclusionp. 289
Referencesp. 294
Indexp. 307
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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