Catalogue


Bringing human rights home : a history of human rights in the United States /
edited by Cynthia Soohoo, Catherine Albisa, and Martha F. Davis.
edition
Abridged ed.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.
description
xi, 411 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
081222079X (alk. paper), 9780812220797 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.
isbn
081222079X (alk. paper)
9780812220797 (alk. paper)
contents note
Preface / Cynthia Soohoo, Catherine Albisa, and Martha F. Davis -- Part I. A History of Human Rights in the United States : -- 1. A human rights lens on U.S. history : human rights at home and human rights abroad / Paul Gordon Lauren -- 2. FDR's four freedoms and wartime transformations in America's discourse of rights / Elizabeth Borgwardt -- 3. A "hollow mockery" : African Americans, white supremacy, and the development of human rights in the United States / Carol Anderson -- 4. "New" human rights? : U.S. ambivalence toward the international economic and social rights framework / Hope Lewis -- Part II. From Civil Rights to Human Rights : -- 5. Against American supremacy : rebuilding human rights culture in the United States / Dorothy Q. Thomas -- 6. Economic and social rights in the United States : six rights, one promise / Catherine Albisa -- 7. Human rights and the transformation of the "civil rights" and "civil liberties" lawyer / Cynthia Soohoo -- 8. "Going global" : appeals to international and regional human rights bodies / Margaret Huang -- 9. Thinking globally, acting locally : states, municipalities, and international human rights / Martha F. Davis -- 10. The impact of September 11 and the struggle against terrorism on the U.S. domestic human rights movement / Wendy Patten -- 11. Bush administration noncompliance with the prohibition on torture and cruel and degrading treatment / Kathryn Sikkink -- 12. Trade unions and human rights / Lance Compa
catalogue key
7081330
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Cynthia Soohoo is Director of the U.S. Legal Program for the Center for Reproductive Rights. Catherine Albisa is Exclusive Director of the National Economic and Social Rights initiative. Martha F. Davis is Professor of Law and Codirector of the Program on Human Rights and the Global Economy at Northeastren University.
Summaries
Main Description
Throughout its history, America's policies have alternatively embraced human rights, regarded them with ambivalence, or rejected them out of hand. The essays inBringing Human Rights Home: A History of Human Rights in the United Statesput these shifting political winds into a larger historical perspective, from the country's very beginnings to the present day. Contributing writers examine the global influences on early American attitudes toward human rights and, reviewing the twentieth century, note the high-water mark of human rights acceptance during Franklin Delano Roosevelt's presidency. They examine the domestic tensions between civil and political rights on the one hand, and economic, social, and cultural rights on the other. Taking the long view, many of the contributors emphasize the role played by social movements and grassroots activists in pressing a human rights agenda from the bottom up. Essays examine the centrality of human rights in the early and mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement, the breadth of subnational human rights activism in the face of federal inaction on a range of human rights issues, and the ways both post-9/11 developments and government responses to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina spurred grassroots activism in the United States. Several essays explore in depth the emergence of new advocacy strategies, both in the context of litigating for civil and political rights and through the lens of particular economic rights sectors, such as labor. Though the setbacks for human rights have been many,Bringing Human Rights Homedemonstrates the strength and resilience of the U.S. human rights movement and offers hope for its future.
Main Description
Throughout its history, America's policies have alternatively embraced human rights, regarded them with ambivalence, or rejected them out of hand. The essays in Bringing Human Rights Home: A History of Human Rights in the United States put these shifting political winds into a larger historical perspective, from the country's very beginnings to the present day. The contributing writers examine the global influences on early American attitudes toward human rights and, reviewing the twentieth century, note the high-water mark of human rights acceptance during Franklin Delano Roosevelt's presidency. They examine the domestic tensions between civil and political rights on the one hand, and economic, social, and cultural rights on the other. Taking the long view, many of the contributors emphasize the role played by social movements and grassroots activists in pressing a human rights agenda from the bottom up. The essays examine the centrality of human rights in the early and mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement, the breadth of subnational human rights activism in the face of federal inaction on a range of human rights issues, and the ways both post-9/11 developments and government responses to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina spurred grassroots activism in the United States. Several essays explore in depth the emergence of new advocacy strategies, both in the context of litigating for civil and political rights and through the lens of particular economic rights sectors, such as labor. Though the setbacks for human rights have been many, Bringing Human Rights Home demonstrates the strength and resilience of the U.S. human rights movement and offers hope for its future.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
A History of Human Rights in the United States
Introduction to Part Ip. 1
A Human Rights Lens on U.S. History: Human Rights at Home and Human Rights Abroadp. 7
FDR's Four Freedoms and Wartime Transformations in America's Discourse of Rightsp. 40
A "Hollow Mockery": African Americans, White Supremacy, and the Development of Human Rights in the United Statesp. 68
"New" Human Rights? U.S. Ambivalence Toward the international Economic and Social Rights Frameworkp. 100
from Civil Rights to Human Rights
Introduction to Part IIp. 143
Against American Supremacy: Rebuilding Human Rights Culture in the United Statesp. 147
Economic and Social Rights in the United States: Six Rights, One Promisep. 173
Human Rights and the Transformation of the "Civil Rights" and "Civil Liberties" Lawyerp. 198
"Going Global": Appeals to International and Regional Human Rights Bodiesp. 235
Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: States, Municipalities, and International Human Rightsp. 258
The Impact of September 11 and the Struggle Against Terrorism on the U.S. Domestic Human Rights Movementp. 287
Bush Administraiton Noncompliance with the Prohibition on Torture and Cruel and Degrading Treatmentp. 326
Trade Unions and Human Rightsp. 351
About the Editors and Contributorsp. 395
Indexp. 399
Acknowledgmentsp. 409
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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