Catalogue


Stewards of the nation's art : contested cultural authority, 1890-1939 /
Andrea Geddes Poole.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2010.
description
xii, 304 p., [12] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780802099600 (bound) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2010.
isbn
9780802099600 (bound) :
catalogue key
7078174
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This book provides a compelling example of the interdisciplinary value of museum studies and of the museum's importance as a place at which culture, history, and society intersect... Poole's book contributes to debates about the making of the British upper class and to the way in which its gendered identity was negotiated at London's museums.'
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Summaries
Main Description
Between 1890 and 1939, the groups of men involved in running Britain's four main public art galleries - the National Gallery, the Tate Gallery, the Wallace Collection, and the National Portrait Gallery - were embroiled in continuous power struggles. Stewards of the Nation's Art examines the internal tensions between the galleries' administrative directors, the aristocrats dominating the boards of trustees, and those in the Treasury who controlled the funds as well as board appointments.Andrea Geddes Poole uses meticulous primary research from all four of these institutions to discuss changing ideas about class, education, and work during this period. The conflicts between aristocratic trustees and administrative directors were not only about the running of the galleries, but also reflected the era's strain between aristocratic amateurs and nouveau riche professionals. Stewards of the Nation's Art is an absorbing study that explores the extent to which the aristocracy was able to hold on to cultural power in an increasingly professional and meritocratic age.
Main Description
Between 1890 and 1939, the groups of men involved in running Britain's four main public art galleries - the National Gallery, the Tate Gallery, the Wallace Collection, and the National Portrait Gallery - were embroiled in continuous power struggles. Stewards of the Nation's Art examines the internal tensions between the galleries' administrative directors, the aristocrats dominating the boards of trustees, and those in the Treasury who controlled the funds as well as board appointments. Andrea Geddes Poole uses meticulous primary research from all four of these institutions to discuss changing ideas about class, education, and work during this period. The conflicts between aristocratic trustees and administrative directors were not only about the running of the galleries, but also reflected the era's strain between aristocratic amateurs and nouveau riche professionals. Stewards of the Nation's Artis an absorbing study that explores the extent to which the aristocracy was able to hold on to cultural power in an increasingly professional and meritocratic age.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
Four Boardsp. 16
Edwardian Philanthropy to the Artsp. 39
The Rosebery Minutep. 57
Boards and Directors, 1890-1916p. 77
The Duchess of Milanp. 109
Lord Curzon's Committeep. 130
Acrimony and Accord, 1918-1939p. 150
Philanthropy between the Warsp. 193
Conclusionp. 214
Appendix: Boards of Trusteesp. 227
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 289
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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