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Learning to salsa : new steps in U.S.-Cuba relations /
Vicki Huddleston, Carlos Pascual.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2010.
description
xiv, 245 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0815703899 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780815703891 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, c2010.
isbn
0815703899 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780815703891 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Cuba : a new policy of critical and constructive engagement -- U.S. policy : constraints of a historical legacy -- Simulation exercise no. 1 : a meeting of the National Security Council, July 28, 2008 -- U.S. policy : a new strategy toward Cuba -- Simulation exercise no. 2 : a meeting of the National Security Council, March 15, 2009 -- Understanding the Cuban leadership -- Simulation exercise no. 3 : a meeting of Raúl Castro and his advisers, March 4, 2008 -- Transforming disparate voices into a dynamic civil society coalition -- Simulation exercise no. 4 : a meeting of Cuban grassroots activists, July 26, 2010 -- Coordinating U.S. policy with the international community -- Simulation exercise no. 5, part I : a meeting of foreign ministers convened by the U.S. Secretary of State in Washington, D.C., October 14, 2010; Part II : a meeting of the National Security Council concerning multilateral engagement and crisis management, November 13, 2010 -- Creating consensus in the Cuban American community -- Simulation exercise no. 6 : a meeting of representatives of the Cuban American community, December 13, 2010 -- Appendixes -- Understanding the legal parameters of the U.S. embargo on Cuba -- 2008 Florida International University poll of Cuban American opinion.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
7077903
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Vicki Huddleston is U.S. deputy assistant secretary of defense for Africa. Before taking this post, she was codirector of the Brookings Project on U.S. Policy toward Cuba in Transition, 2007-09. A veteran diplomat, she was head of the U.S. mission in Cuba from 1999 to 2002. Carlos Pascual, now U.S. ambassador to Mexico, was vice president and director of foreign policy at Brookings Institution, 2006-09. He also has served as U.S. ambassador to Ukraine and is coauthor of Power and Responsibility: Building International Order in an Era of Transnational Threat (Brookings, 2009).
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A thought-provoking, timely, and original contribution from two of America'smost impressive public servants and foreign policy practitioners. Our nation hasan opportunity to reassess and reshape our policy toward Cuba. In this engaging,forward-looking book, Vicki Huddleston and Carlos Pascual show us how." --Thomas "Mack" McLarty, White House Special Envoy for the Americas, 1996–98
"Somehow, to the amazement of all involved, the Right, the Left, and the Centercame to the Brookings table to forge a road map out of the fifty-year quicksandbog of U.S.-Cuba relations. Just how Carlos Pascual and Vicki Huddlestonassembled us all remains a mystery, but the result is an undeniable breakthrough:a concrete, pragmatic blueprint for a future with Cuba in which the United Statesrecuses itself from its role as the Castros' Goliath, while averting an even worseoutcome: irrelevancy. Hallelulah.... Adelante!" --Annie Bardach, University of California–Berkeley and author of Without Fidel:A Death Foretold in Miami, Havana, and Washington
"Stemming from a highly creative, original --and yet rigorous --methodology, thisbook provides a practical blueprint for a new U.S. policy of engagement towardCuba. If adopted on the terms suggested by Pascual and Huddleston, that policywould serve both the interests of the Cuban people and American diplomacy; asa bonus it would also remove a traditional cause of uneasiness in the relationshipbetween the U.S. and many of the other Latin American republics." --Ernesto Zedillo, Director, Yale Center for the Study of Globalization,and President of Mexico, 1994–2000
"Through this project, Huddleston and Pascual present a pragmatic policy strategyfor U.S. relations with Cuba. They put forth a well-grounded road map for effectiveengagement that would improve our ability to broadly advance U.S. interests, fromhuman rights to security and commercial opportunities. This book is excellentreading for policymakers, analysts, practitioners, and students of U.S.-Cuba affairs." --Sen. Richard G. Lugar of Indiana, Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"Drawing on simulation exercises involving role playing and extensive debates, explores how major developments within or outside Cuba might open opportunities for the U.S. to reengage with the island nation and support Cuban actors in initiating change from within, and reveals specific challenges to crafting a new U.S. approach"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Today the United States has little leverage to promote change in Cuba. Indeed, Cuba enjoys normal relations with virtually every country in the world, and American attempts to isolate the Cuban government have served only to elevate its symbolic predicament as an "underdog" in the international arena. A new policy of engagement toward Cuba is long overdue . --From the Introduction As longtime U.S. diplomats Vicki Huddleston and Carlos Pascual make painfully clear in their introduction, the United States is long overdue in rethinking its policy toward Cuba. This is a propitious time for such an undertaking --the combination of change within Cuba and in the Cuban American community creates the most significant opening for a reassessment of U.S. policy since Fidel Castro took control in 1959. To that end, Huddleston and Pascual convened opinion leaders in the Cuban American community, leading scholars, and international diplomats from diverse backgrounds and political orientations to seek common ground on U.S. policy toward Cuba. This pithy yet authoritative analysis is the result. In the quest for ideas that would support the emergence of a peaceful, prosperous, and democratic Cuba --one in which the Cuban people shape their political and economic future --the authors conducted a series of simulations to identify the critical factors that the U.S. government should consider as it reformulates its Cuba policies. The advisers' wide-ranging expertise was applied to a series of hypothetical scenarios in which participants tested how different U.S. policy responses would affect a political transition in Cuba. By modeling and analyzing the decisionmaking processes of the various strategic actors and stakeholders, the simulations identified factors that might influence the success or failure of specific policy options. They then projected how key actors such as the Cuban hierarchy, civil society, and the international and Cuban American communities might act and react to internal and external events that would logically be expected to occur in the near future. The lessons drawn from these simulations led to the unanimous conclusion that the United States should adopt a proactive policy of critical and constructive engagement toward Cuba.
Main Description
Today the UnitedStates has little leverage to promote change in Cuba. Indeed, Cuba enjoys normal relationswith virtually every country in the world, and American attempts to isolate the Cubangovernment have served only to elevate its symbolic predicament as an "underdog" in theinternational arena. A new policy of engagement toward Cuba is longoverdue. ¿From the Introduction Aslongtime U.S. diplomats Vicki Huddleston and Carlos Pascual make painfully clear in theirintroduction, the United States is long overdue in rethinking its policy toward Cuba. Thisis a propitious time for such an undertaking ¿the combination of change within Cuba and inthe Cuban American community creates the most significant opening for a reassessment of U.S.policy since Fidel Castro took control in 1959. To that end, Huddleston and Pascual convenedopinion leaders in the Cuban American community, leading scholars, and internationaldiplomats from diverse backgrounds and political orientations to seek common ground on U.S.policy toward Cuba. This pithy yet authoritative analysis is theresult. In the quest for ideas that would support theemergence of a peaceful, prosperous, and democratic Cuba ¿one in which the Cuban peopleshape their political and economic future ¿the authors conducted a series of simulations toidentify the critical factors that the U.S. government should consider as it reformulatesits Cuba policies. The advisers' wide-ranging expertise was applied to a series ofhypothetical scenarios in which participants tested how different U.S. policy responseswould affect a political transition in Cuba. By modelingand analyzing the decisionmaking processes of the various strategic actors and stakeholders,the simulations identified factors that might influence the success or failure of specificpolicy options. They then projected how key actors such as the Cuban hierarchy, civilsociety, and the international and Cuban American communities might act and react tointernal and external events that would logically be expected to occur in the nearfuture. The lessons drawn from these simulations led tothe unanimous conclusion that the United States should adopt a proactive policy of criticaland constructive engagement toward Cuba.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. vii
List of Advisersp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Cuba: A New Policy of Critical and Constructive Engagementp. 14
U.S. Policy: Constraints of a Historical Legacyp. 34
Simulation Exercise No. 1: A Meeting of the National Security Council, July 28, 2008p. 36
U.S. Policy: A New Strategy toward Cuba Simulation Exercise No. 2: A Meeting of the National Security Council, March 15, 2009p. 59
Understanding the Cuban Leadershipp. 84
Simulation Exercise No. 3: A Meeting of Raúl Castro and His Advisers, March 4, 2008p. 86
Transforming Disparate Voices into a Dynamic Civil Society Coalitionp. 115
Simulation Exercise No. 4: A Meeting of Cuban Grassroots Activists, July 26, 2010p. 126
Coordinating U.S. Policy with the International Communityp. 147
Simulation Exercise No. 5
A Meeting of Foreign Ministers Convened by the U.S. Secretary of State in Washington, D.C., October 14, 2010;p. 153
A Meeting of the National Security Council Concerning Multilateral Engagement and Crisis Management, November 13, 2010p. 262
Creating Consensus in the Cuban American Communityp. 181
Simulation Exercise No. 6: A Meeting of Representatives of the Cuban American Community, December 13, 2010p. 190
Appendixes
Understanding the Legal Parameters of the U.S. Embargo on Cubap. 221
2008 Florida International University Poll of Cuban American Opinionp. 229
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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