Catalogue


Alabama's civil rights trail : an illustrated guide to the cradle of freedom /
Frye Gaillard ; with Jennifer Lindsay and Jane DeNeefe ; foreword by Juan Williams.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2010.
description
xxv, 350 p.
ISBN
0817355812 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780817355814 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2010.
isbn
0817355812 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780817355814 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7077309
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-06-01:
Alabama was at the center of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and there are many significant historical locations around the state. Gaillard (Prophet from Plains: Jimmy Carter and His Legacy) has parsed out significant historical sites by location and woven them together with captivating stories of events and the personalities involved in them. The reader is given a list of places to see on a tour of historical locations, and the tales bring the sites to life. The book is peppered with black-and-white photographs of people, buildings, statues, and many other items covered in the text. Also included are maps and a time line of events. Verdict This book walks a fine line between academic and popular and will be enjoyed by lovers of history and place as well as readers interested in learning more about the Civil Rights Movement and locations of significance in Alabama.-Anna Creech, Univ. of Richmond Lib., VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Frye Gaillard's Alabama's Civil Rights Trail broadens the [civil rights] story considerably by examining in-detail the people and events in Alabama that helped to accelerate the struggle for human rights. For Gaillard, every individual and each act of resistance that helped to secure consitutional liberties for African Americans deserves recognition. ... Alabama's Civil Rights Trail offers both scholars and an interested public a refreshing resource for examining the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama."-- Southern Historian
"Gaillard is also to be commended for the breadth of this book. The 23
“Alabama is known around the world for its natural beauty, the Crimson Tide football team, and its southern traditions. Alabama is also known to the world as the scene, the intriguing and mythic place, for so many vital lessons of American history-specifically civil rights history. . . . These are places that harbor the spirits of human struggle with right and wrong, triumph and despair, courage and cowardice. They are the sites of historic struggles for justice under law and human rights, central to the ideals of America’s Founding Fathers. . . . To visit Alabama today is to see and feel Dr. King’s vision come to life. The fight for racial equality has made so many strides. The state today is a testament to the many people-black and white, young and old-who took heroic stands at these schools, courthouses, and churches, who fought and shed blood for equal rights.” -From the foreword by Juan Williams
"Gaillard is also to be commended for the breadth of this book. The 23 cities included in the guide span the full length of the state, from Florence to Bayou la Batre. In contrast, the state tourism department’s civil rights trail guide covers only five cities, Birmingham, Greensboro, Selma, Montgomery and Tuskegee. Gaillard’s more inclusive view of the important sites throughout the state provides us with a much more accurate picture and reflects the scholarship of his previous works on Alabama’s rich civil rights history."-- Mobile Press-Register
"The hundred-fifty mile stretch along U.S. Highway 80 stretching through the Alabama Black Belt from Phenix City to Demopolis became the epic center of the most important human rights movement of the Twentieth Century. Fortunately for the many visitors from around the world to the terrain of those great struggles during the 1950s and 1960s, Alabama has not only maintained that trail of horror, violence, pride, and justice, but now celebrates it as the beginning of a new era in state history. Frye Gaillard has now provided a guide book worthy of the events that transpired there." -Dr. Wayne Flynt, Professor Emeritus, Auburn University
"Gaillard is also to be commended for the breadth of this book. The 23 cities included in the guide span the full length of the state, from Florence to Bayou la Batre. In contrast, the state tourism department's civil rights trail guide covers only five cities, Birmingham, Greensboro, Selma, Montgomery and Tuskegee. Gaillard's more inclusive view of the important sites throughout the state provides us with a much more accurate picture and reflects the scholarship of his previous works on Alabama's rich civil rights history."-- Mobile Press-Register
"Gaillard is also to be commended for the breadth of this book. The 23 cities included in the guide span the full length of the state, from Florence to Bayou la Batre. In contrast, the state tourism department's civil rights trail guide covers only five cities, Birmingham, Greensboro, Selma, Montgomery and Tuskegee. Gaillard's more inclusive view of the important sites throughout the state provides us with a much more accurate picture and reflects the scholarship of his previous works on Alabama's rich civil rights history."--Mobile Press-Register
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
No other state has embraced and preserved its civil rights history more thoroughly than Alabama. Nor is there a place where that history is richer. Alabama’s Civil Rights Trail tells of Alabama’s great civil rights events, as well as its lesser-known moments, in a compact and accessible narrative, paired with a practical guide to Alabama’s preserved civil rights sites and monuments. In his history of Alabama’s civil rights movement, Cradle of Freedom (University of Alabama Press, 2004), Frye Gaillard contends that Alabama played the lead role in a historic movement that made all citizens of the nation, black and white, more free. This book, geared toward the casual traveler and the serious student alike, showcases in a vividly illustrated and compelling manner, valuable and rich details. It provides a user-friendly, graphic tool for the growing number of travelers, students, and civil rights pilgrims who visit the state annually. The story of the civil rights movement in Alabama is told city by city, region by region, and town by town, with entries on Montgomery, Birmingham, Selma, Tuscaloosa, Tuskegee, and Mobile, as well as chapters on the Black Belt and the Alabama hill country. Smaller but important locales such as Greensboro, Monroeville, and Scottsboro are included, as are more obscure sites like Hale County’s Safe House Black History Museum and the birthplace of the Black Panther Party in Lowndes County.
Main Description
No other state has embraced and preserved its civil rights history more thoroughly than Alabama. Nor is there a place where that history is richer. Alabamau2019s Civil Rights Trail tells of Alabamau2019s great civil rights events, as well as its lesser-known moments, in a compact and accessible narrative, paired with a practical guide to Alabamau2019s preserved civil rights sites and monuments.In his history of Alabamau2019s civil rights movement, Cradle of Freedom (University of Alabama Press, 2004), Frye Gaillard contends that Alabama played the lead role in a historic movement that made all citizens of the nation, black and white, more free. This book, geared toward the casual traveler and the serious student alike, showcases in a vividly illustrated and compelling manner, valuable and rich details. It provides a user-friendly, graphic tool for the growing number of travelers, students, and civil rights pilgrims who visit the state annually.The story of the civil rights movement in Alabama is told city by city, region by region, and town by town, with entries on Montgomery, Birmingham, Selma, Tuscaloosa, Tuskegee, and Mobile, as well as chapters on the Black Belt and the Alabama hill country. Smaller but important locales such as Greensboro, Monroeville, and Scottsboro are included, as are more obscure sites like Hale Countyu2019s Safe House Black History Museum and the birthplace of the Black Panther Party in Lowndes County.
Main Description
No other state has embraced and preserved its civil rights history more thoroughly than Alabama. Nor is there a place where that history is richer. Alabama's Civil Rights Trail tells of Alabama's great civil rights events, as well as its lesser-known moments, in a compact and accessible narrative, paired with a practical guide to Alabama's preserved civil rights sites and monuments. In his history of Alabama's civil rights movement, Cradle of Freedom (University of Alabama Press, 2004), Frye Gaillard contends that Alabama played the lead role in a historic movement that made all citizens of the nation, black and white, more free. This book, geared toward the casual traveler and the serious student alike, showcases in a vividly illustrated and compelling manner, valuable and rich details. It provides a user-friendly, graphic tool for the growing number of travelers, students, and civil rights pilgrims who visit the state annually. The story of the civil rights movement in Alabama is told city by city, region by region, and town by town, with entries on Montgomery, Birmingham, Selma, Tuscaloosa, Tuskegee, and Mobile, as well as chapters on the Black Belt and the Alabama hill country. Smaller but important locales such as Greensboro, Monroeville, and Scottsboro are included, as are more obscure sites like Hale County's Safe House Black History Museum and the birthplace of the Black Panther Party in Lowndes County.
Main Description
The story of the Civil rights movement in Alabama is told city by city, region by region, and town by town, with entries on Montgomery, Birmingham, Selma, Tuscaloosa, Tuskegee, and Mobile, as well as chapters on the Black Belt and the Alabama hill country. Smaller but important locales such as Greensboro, Monroeville, and Scottsboro are included, as are more obscure sites like Hale County's Safe House Black History Museum and the birthplace of the Black Panther Party in Lowndes County. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Alabama's Civil Rights Timelinep. ix
Abbreviationsp. xv
Forewordp. xvii
Introductionp. xxiii
The Montgomery Story: Hallowed Groundp. 1
Drawing the Linep. 2
Sidebar: Flip Side of the Markerp. 10
Men of Godp. 11
A White Preacher's Couragep. 20
The Frank M. Johnson Federal Courthouse: Victory in the Courtsp. 23
The Freedom Ridersp. 29
Sidebar: The Legacy of Alabama State Universityp. 30
Food for the Body and Soulp. 38
The Southern Poverty Law Center: Keeper of the Flamep. 41
Sidebar: City of St. Judep. 42
Birmingham and the American Consciencep. 49
the Childrenp. 50
Boutwell Auditorium: Dark Days Aheadp. 59
Birmingham's Man of Steelp. 62
Sidebar: Miles College: "We Shall Overcome"p. 63
Armstrong's Barber Shop and the "Ushers"p. 70
Sidebar: Birmingham and the Freedom Ridesp. 76
The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church: Four Little Girlsp. 74
Sidebar: The Birmingham Civil Rights Institutep. 84
Selma and the Right to Votep. 87
The Quiet Beginningp. 89
The Courthouse and Sheriff Jim Clarkp. 93
Sidebar: Another Boynton in Historyp. 94
Sidebar: Malcolm X in Selmap. 100
The Edmund Pettus Bridge: Bloody Sunday and Beyondp. 102
Selma University: Cradle of Heroesp. 110
Sidebar: Dr. Sullivan Jackson's Housep. 111
Sidebar: Church and Statep. 112
Alabama's First Black Congressmanp. 114
Selma: City of Museumsp. 117
Revolution in the Black Beltp. 123
Lowndes County: Two Martyrs and the Votep. 125
Sidebar: Highway 80: The Road to Freedomp. 133
The Black Panthersp. 134
The Martyrdom of Jimmie Lee Jacksonp. 138
Coretta Scott King: First Lady of the Movementp. 145
The Quilts of Gee's Bend, Wilcox Countyp. 150
Marengo County: Reclaiming the Historyp. 156
Sidebar: James Haskins, 1941-2005p. 163
Hale County's Safe Housep. 164
Greene County and Dr. King's Farewellp. 167
Tuscaloosa and the Schoolhouse Doorp. 171
George Wallace Makes His Standp. 173
The Ordeal of Autherine Lucyp. 180
Sidebar: The Making of a Mobp. 186
Sidebar: First African Baptist Churchp. 188
RFK: A Measure of Changep. 191
The Curious Legacy of "The Bear"p. 194
The Tuskegee Storyp. 197
Booker T. Washington: Lifting the Veilp. 199
The Tuskegee Airmenp. 204
Sidebar: The Carver Museump. 205
Shiloh: Rosenwald Schools and the Syphilis Studyp. 212
Dr. Gomillion and the Votep. 217
SNCC and the Killing of Sammy Younge Jr.p. 222
Sidebar: A Transfer of Powerp. 227
Sidebar: "Invisible Man"p. 228
The Burning Bus and the Alabama Hillsp. 229
Anniston: The Library and the Busp. 231
Gadsden and the Cattle Prodsp. 238
Talladega College and the Amistad Muralsp. 243
Sidebar: The Message of Jerry "Boogie" McCainp. 244
Huntsville: A History in Piecesp. 249
Sidebar: Dred Scott, Little Richard, and Oakwood Universityp. 255
Mobile: City of Progress, City of Backlashp. 257
John LeFlore, Joseph Langan, and NOWp. 259
Spring Hill College: The First to Integratep. 267
Africatown and the Last Slave Shipp. 272
Sidebar: Wallace Turnage: "A Slave No More"p. 277
Completing the Journeyp. 280
The Last Lynching, Death to the Klanp. 283
Southern Justice in Mobilep. 287
Other Places of Interestp. 293
The New Old Southp. 294
Sidebar: The Eastern Shorep. 299
Monroeville: The Community of Atticus Finchp. 298
Alabama Heroesp. 304
The Legacy of Alabama Musicp. 309
The Scottsboro Boysp. 314
Ardmore: Terror in the Nightp. 319
Acknowledgments and Sourcesp. 323
Suggested Readingp. 331
Indexp. 333
About the Authorsp. 347
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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