Catalogue


Actors and icons of the ancient theater /
Eric Csapo.
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
description
xiv, 233 p.
ISBN
9781405135368 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
isbn
9781405135368 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
A portrait of the artist I : theatre-realistic art in Athens, 500-330 BC -- A portrait of the artist II : theatre-realistic art in the Greek west, 400-300 BC -- The spread of theater and the rise of the actor -- Kallippides on the floor sweepings : the limits of realism in ancient acting -- Cooking with Menander : slices from the ancient home entertainment industry? -- The politics of privatization : a short history of the privatization of drama from classical Athens to early imperial Rome.
catalogue key
7074912
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-01-01:
Also author of Theories of Mythology (2005) and coauthor (with W. J. Slater) of The Context of Ancient Drama (1995), Csapo (Univ. of Sydney, Australia) provides an excellent collection of Oxford lectures (all revised) that rehearse and challenge old evidence and preconceived theories on the history and image of actors from classical Greece to early imperial Rome. He also explores neglected and newly discovered ancient iconography of theater--found on objects ranging from pottery to marble-relief fragments, terracotta statues, mosaics, and diptychs--to provide innovative perspectives on the impact and spread of theater and theater imagery throughout the ancient world. Notable topics include iconography as a source for evidence of theater history, heightened realism in theater art and acting, the surprisingly early canonization of classical authors, the rise of the acting profession, the privatization of drama, and the ever-changing imagery of actors in antiquity. What sets this book apart from similar works is its superb collection and socioeconomic study of extant ancient artifacts. This is a fascinating read of the ancient world and the dynamic relationships between its theater, politics, and popular culture. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. J. E. Polster Emerson College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Actors and Icons is a compelling account of the development of acting in antiquity, taking actors all the way from adjuncts (hypokritai who 'answer' the chorus), to famous, favoured members of the imperial circle". (Scholia Reviews, 1 October 2010)
"Csapo provides an excellent collection of Oxford lectures (all revised) that rehearse and challenge old evidence and preconceived theories on the history and image of actors from classical Greece to early imperial Rome...What sets this book apart from similar work is its superb collection and socioeconomic study of extant ancient artifacts. This is a fascinating read of the ancient world and the dynamic relationships between its theatre, politics, and popular culture." ( CHOICE , January 2011)"Actors and Icons is a compelling account of the development of acting in antiquity, taking actors all the way from adjuncts (hypokritai who ‘answer' the chorus), to famous, favoured members of the imperial circle". (Scholia Reviews, 1 October 2010)
"Csapo's book covers an impressive range of different topics and periods in ancient theatrical history". (Times Literary Supplement, 8 July 2011) "No scholar of the ancient theater can afford to ignore the arguments put forward in this stimulating and exciting book." (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 1 April 2011) "Csapo provides an excellent collection of Oxford lectures (all revised) that rehearse and challenge old evidence and preconceived theories on the history and image of actors from classical Greece to early imperial Rome...What sets this book apart from similar work is its superb collection and socioeconomic study of extant ancient artifacts. This is a fascinating read of the ancient world and the dynamic relationships between its theatre, politics, and popular culture." ( CHOICE , January 2011)"Actors and Icons is a compelling account of the development of acting in antiquity, taking actors all the way from adjuncts (hypokritai who ‘answer' the chorus), to famous, favoured members of the imperial circle". (Scholia Reviews, 1 October 2010)
"No scholar of the ancient theater can afford to ignore the arguments put forward in this stimulating and exciting book." (Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 1 April 2011) "Csapo provides an excellent collection of Oxford lectures (all revised) that rehearse and challenge old evidence and preconceived theories on the history and image of actors from classical Greece to early imperial Rome...What sets this book apart from similar work is its superb collection and socioeconomic study of extant ancient artifacts. This is a fascinating read of the ancient world and the dynamic relationships between its theatre, politics, and popular culture." ( CHOICE , January 2011)"Actors and Icons is a compelling account of the development of acting in antiquity, taking actors all the way from adjuncts (hypokritai who ‘answer' the chorus), to famous, favoured members of the imperial circle". (Scholia Reviews, 1 October 2010)
"Eric Csapo has ferreted out an extraordinary quantity of underappreciated evidence, which he pulls together to produce a highly original and convincing history of actors and acting in the ancient world. Essential reading for understanding the whole context of the great achievements of ancient Greek tragedy and comedy." Oliver Taplin, Oxford University "With an excellent command of the many kinds of evidence, E. Csapo focuses on the actor's image. He gives us a fascinating new history of the ancient theater." Brigitte Le Guen, Paris 8 University "An enthralling read. Nobody brings the world of the ancient theatre alive like Eric Csapo. From the ways Greek actors reduced their audiences to tears or helpless laughter to the economic and political importance of the Roman entertainment industry, he sees vivid details that pass other scholars by. The range of new evidence and insights is breathtaking. Compulsory reading for all historians of ancient theatre, society or culture." Edith Hall, Royal Holloway University of London
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Actors and Icons of the Ancient Theater examines the realities of everyday life for actors -- and their popular reception -- from the time of theater's emergence in Classical Greece to its subsequent demise during the Roman Empire. In a series of six pioneering essays, noted Classical scholar Eric Csapo un-masks the ancient acting profession to reveal myriad facets of its social, economic, and political history. Along with addressing the evolving image of the actor in Attic and West Greek art, Csapo shows how the rapid expansion of the theater industry from about 430 BC provided the economic basis for the development of an independent and highly competitive acting profession. Other original studies reveal how the emergence of professional actors in the late fifth century changed the way tragedy and comedy were written, and what theater iconography tells us about the activity and performance styles of actors from the Hellenistic period to the Early Byzantine Empire. A final study addresses the history of the privatization of theater from Late Classical to Imperial times. Revelatory and thought-provoking, Actors and Icons of the Ancient Theater offers students and scholars alike fascinating new insights into the origins and evolution of one of the world's most enduring traditions.
Back Cover Copy
Actors and Icons of the Ancient Theater examines the realities of everyday life for actors -- and their popular reception -- from the time of theater's emergence in Classical Greece to its subsequent demise during the Roman Empire. In a series of six pioneering essays, noted Classical scholar Eric Csapo un-masks the ancient acting profession to reveal myriad facets of its social, economic, and political history. Along with addressing the evolving image of the actor in Attic and West Greek art, Csapo shows how the rapid expansion of the theater industry from about 430 BC provided the economic basis for the development of an independent and highly competitive acting profession. Other original studies reveal how the emergence of professional actors in the late fifth century changed the way tragedy and comedy were written, and what theater iconography tells us about the activity and performance styles of actors from the Hellenistic period to the Early Byzantine Empire. A final study addresses the history of the privatization of theater from Late Classical to Imperial times.Revelatory and thought-provoking, Actors and Icons of the Ancient Theater offers students and scholars alike fascinating new insights into the origins and evolution of one of the world's most enduring traditions.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work examines actors and their popular reception from the origins of theatre in Classical Greece to the Roman Empire. The book presents a highly original viewpoint into several new and contested fields of study and offers a systematic survey of evidence for the spread of theatre outside Athens.
Main Description
Actors and Icons of the Ancient Theater examines actors and their popular reception from the origins of theater in Classical Greece to the Roman Empire Presents a highly original viewpoint into several new and contested fields of study Offers the first systematic survey of evidence for the spread of theater outside Athens and the impact of the expansion of theater upon actors and dramatic literature Addresses a study of the privatization of theater and reveals how it was driven by political interests Challenges preconceived notions about theater history
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. vi
Prefacep. viii
List of abbreviationsp. xiii
A Portrait of the Artist I: Theater-Realistic Art in Athens, 500-330 bcp. 1
A Portrait of the Artist II: Theater-Realistic Art in the Greek West, 400-300 bcp. 38
The Spread of Theater and the Rise of the Actorp. 83
Kallippides on the Floor Sweepings: The Limits of Realism in Classical Actingp. 117
Cooking with Menander: Slices from the Ancient Home Entertainment Industry?p. 140
The Politics of Privatization: A Short History of the Privatization of Drama from Classical Athens to Early Imperial Romep. 168
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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