Catalogue


Famine in Scotland : the 'ill years' of the 1690s /
Karen J. Cullen.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
description
xi, 218 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0748638873 (hbk.), 9780748638871 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2010.
isbn
0748638873 (hbk.)
9780748638871 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7074659
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-213) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Karen J. Cullen is Lecturer in Scottish History at the Centre for History, UHI Millennium Institute, the future University of the Highlands and Islands. She is author of a number of chapters and articles on the subject of famine in Scotland in the 1690s. Her current research interests lie in seventeenth and eighteenth century Scottish social, economic and demographic history.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Cullen's book is a useful addition to the literature on early-modern famine, poverty, and indeed on Scottish history more generally.
Cullen's major success is in filling the gaping hole in Scottish historiography relative to the 'Ill Years' of the 1690s. Histories to date have more often than not paid only minimal attention to the famine. This monograph should be seen as a welcome addition for all scholars who wish to better understand this neglected episode in Scottish history.
Cullen's work is a long awaited and hugely valuable contribution on Scottish famine. Contemporary debates on climate change and the terrible reality of famine in the world today means Cullen's work has a contemporary relevance as well as a particular significance for those studying the pre-Union era.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This book examines the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, the nature and extent of the crisis which ensued, and what the impact of the famine was upon the population in demographic, economic and social terms. The 'Ill Years', during the nadir of the Little Ice Age, were ones of widespread famine across Europe and economic disaster in Scotland. However, current published knowledge about the causes, extent and impact of the famine in Scotland is limited and many conclusions have been speculative in the absence of extensive research. This is the first full study of the famine, providing a unique scholarly examination of the causes, course, characteristics and consequences of the crisis. Using detailed examination of agricultural, climatic and demographic issues, the book seeks to establish answers to the fundamental question concerning the event. How serious was it? Using detailed statistical and qualitative analysis, Karen J. Cullen discusses the regional factors that defined the famine, the impact on the population, and the interconnected causes of this traumatic event. Karen J. Cullen is Lecturer in Scottish History at the Centre for History, UHI Millennium Institute, the future University of the Highlands and Islands. She is author of a number of chapters and articles on the subject of famine in Scotland in the 1690s. Her current research interests lie in seventeenth and eighteenth century Scottish social, economic and demographic history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book examines the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, the nature and extent of the crisis which ensued, and what the impact of the famine was upon the population in demographic, economic and social terms.
Description for Reader
This book examines the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, the nature and extent of the crisis which ensued, and what the impact of the famine was upon the population in demographic, economic and social terms. The 'Ill Years', during the nadir of the Little Ice Age, were ones of widespread famine across Europe and economic disaster in Scotland. However, current published knowledge about the causes, extent and impact of the famine in Scotland is limited and many conclusions have been speculative in the absence of extensive research. This is the first full study of the famine, providing a unique scholarly examination of the causes, course, characteristics and consequences of the crisis. Using detailed examination of agricultural, climatic and demographic issues, the book seeks to establish answers to the fundamental question concerning the event. How serious was it? Using detailed statistical and qualitative analysis, Karen J. Cullen discusses the regional factors that defined the famine, the impact on the population, and the interconnected causes of this traumatic event.
Description for Teachers/Educators
17th century Scottish history; Union of the Parliaments of 1707; European Famine and demographic studies; early modern economic history; early modern demographic history; Sample course titles: 'Restoration, Revolution, Union and Rebellion: Scotland c.1660-c.1760', 'Questions of Ulster, 1590 to 2004', 'Scotland's New Horizons, c.1690-1850 Union Revolution & Empire', 'Europe & Scotland, 1500-1750: From Reformation to Revolution', 'Disease and the Environment, c. 1500 - 2000', Scotland and Europe c.1600-1750 ', 'Union to Reform: Scotland, 1689 - 1800', 'Scotland, 1603-1707', 'The Great Irish Famine, 1845-1852: Hunger, Modernity and Exile', 'Disease and Society', Williamite Scotland 1688-1702', 'The 1707 Act of Union in a British and European Context'History and/or Scottish History Departments in the Universities of Aberdeen, Dundee, St Andrews, Stirling, Edinburgh, Strathclyde, UHI.
Main Description
This book examines the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, the nature and extent of the crisis which ensued, and what the impact of the famine was upon the population in demographic, economic and social terms. Current published knowledge about the causes, extent, and impact of the famine in Scotland is limited and many conclusions have been speculative in the absence of extensive research. Despite the critical importance of this crisis, one of the four disasters of the 1690s, which are widely acknowledged to have contributed to the economic arguments in favour of the Union of the Parliaments in 1707, the topic has been largely neglected and even underplayed by historians. This is the first full study of the famine, providing a unique scholarly examination of the causes, course, characteristics and consequences of the crisis. A comprehensive study of agricultural, climatic, economic, social and demographic issues, the book seeks to establish answers to the fundamental question concerning the event. How serious was it? Using detailed statistical and qualitative analysis, it discusses the regional factors that defined the famine, the impact on the population, and the interconnected causes of this traumatic event.
Main Description
This book is the first full study of the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, one of the four disasters of the 1690s that contributed to the economic arguments in favor of the 1707 Union of the Parliaments. The book also considers the extent of the subsequent crisis and what demographic, economic, and social impact the famine had on the Scottish population. Despite the critical importance of this crisis, the topic has been largely neglected by historians-even underplayed. This analysis uniquely examines the causes, course, characteristics, and consequences of the famine, offering new perspective on the agricultural, climatic, economic, social, and demographic aspects of the event. With detailed statistical and qualitative analyses, the study identifies the regional factors that defined the famine, its impact on the population, and the interconnected causes of this traumatic event.
Main Description
This book is the first full study of the climatic and economic origins of the last national famine to occur in Scotland, one of the four disasters of the 1690s that contributed to the economic arguments in favor of the 1707 Union of the Parliaments. The book also considers the extent of the subsequent crisis and what demographic, economic, and social impact the famine had on the Scottish population. Despite the critical importance of this crisis, the topic has been largely neglected by historians& -even underplayed. This analysis uniquely examines the causes, course, characteristics, and consequences of the famine, offering new perspective on the agricultural, climatic, economic, social, and demographic aspects of the event. With detailed statistical and qualitative analyses, the study identifies the regional factors that defined the famine, its impact on the population, and the interconnected causes of this traumatic event.
Table of Contents
Tables and Figuresp. vi
Abbreviationsp. viii
Glossary of Termsp. x
Acknowledgementsp. xii
County Map of Scotlandp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Scotland's Seven Ill Years: Contexts and Debatesp. 10
Climate, Weather and Agriculture: The Making of a Faminep. 31
There Arose a Dearth: The Grain Market in Crisisp. 54
Providing for the Destitutep. 93
Famine: The Demographic Disasterp. 123
Fleeing the Famine: Migration and Emigrationp. 157
Conclusionp. 187
Appendix: Poor Assessmentp. 192
Bibliographyp. 197
Indexp. 214
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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