Catalogue


Madness in the family : insanity and institutions in the Australasian colonial world, 1860-1914 /
Catharine Coleborne.
imprint
Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xv, 220 p.
ISBN
0230578071 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780230578074 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230578071 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780230578074 (hardback : alk. paper)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: List of Figures List of Maps List of Tables Acknowledgments Introduction Colonial Psychiatry in the Australasian World Families and the Colonial Hospital System, 1860-1900 Families and the Language of Insanity Writing to and from the Asylum Tracing Families for Maintenance Payments Porous Boundaries: Families, Patients and Practices of Extra-Institutional Care Conclusion: Families, Insanity, and the Archive Appendix: Indications of insanity noted by family and friends of inmate prior to committal Notes Bibliography Index.
abstract
"Madness in the Family explores how colonial families coped with insanity through a trans-colonial study of the relationships between families and public colonial hospitals for the insane in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and New Zealand between 1860 and 1914"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7068769
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Catharine Coleborne is Associate Professor of History at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. Her book Reading 'Madness': Gender and Difference in the Colonial Asylum in Victoria, Australia, 1848-1880, was published in 2007. She is currently part of a now team project to investigate insanity and ethnicity in colonial Australasia.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-07-01:
Asylums were established to keep patients safe, to "cure" them, and to relieve families of difficult household situations. Historians have explored asylums by examining the demographics of the patient population, asylum management, and the institutions themselves, as exemplified by the work of Nancy Tomes (A Generous Confidence, CH, Nov'84), Ellen Dwyer (Homes for the Mad, CH, Dec'87), and Stephen Garton (Medicine and Madness, 1988). Coleborne (Univ. of Waikato, NZ) argues that historians should shift their attention to a discussion of larger historical networks, such as the family. Using the context of colonial Australasia, she examined archival materials from four institutions in Australia and New Zealand, including patient case records, family and institutional correspondence, case notes, and committal papers, to discuss how public asylums defined patient populations and patient-family relationships. These institutions determined the types of relationships between families and authorities, which Coleborne's well-organized discussion explores from the perspective of the institution administrators, family members, and patients. Seven chapters are organized thematically around the family's experience with and letters to asylum patients in colonial Australasia. A great addition to the literature on asylums and mental health in colonial Australasia. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. L. Charleroy University of Minnesota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2010
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Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"Madness in the Family explores how colonial families coped with insanity through a trans-colonial study of the relationships between families and public colonial hospitals for the insane in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and New Zealand between 1860 and 1914"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Madness in the Family explores how colonial families coped with insanity through a trans-colonial study of the relationships between families and public colonial hospitals for the insane in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and New Zealand between 1860 and 1914.
Main Description
Madness in the Familyexplores how colonial families coped with insanity through a trans-colonial study of the relationships between families and public colonial hospitals for the insane in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and New Zealand between 1860 and 1914.
Description for Bookstore
Madness in the Family is a trans-colonial study of the relationships between families and public colonial hospitals for the insane in Australia and New Zealand between 1860 and 1914
Long Description
Madness in the Family is the first comparative study of families and insanity: a trans-colonial study of the relationships between European families and public colonial hospitals for the insane in Australia and New Zealand between 1860 and 1914. It explores issues such as how colonial families coped with insanity, interaction between physicians and the sick, and whether physicians and families had different ways of viewing, describing, and treating insanity. Drawing on rich and moving archival evidence the book also raises methodological and theoretical questions about the asylum archive. What we can ever 'know' about mental breakdown in the past is contingent upon the way the archival sources have been collated, what is extant, and how we read these materials.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
List of Mapsp. x
List of Tablesp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
Colonial Psychiatry in the Australasian Worldp. 15
Psychiatry in the British colonial worldp. 17
Colonial asylum environmentsp. 27
The medical superintendentsp. 31
Patient populationsp. 36
Families and the Colonial Hospital System, 1860-1910p. 43
Insanity and colonial societyp. 44
Families 'scattered about the colonies'p. 51
Heredity and degenerationp. 54
Families and hospitals for the insanep. 59
Families and the Language of Insanityp. 65
Popular and expert understandings of madnessp. 69
Marginal notes: family observations in patient case notesp. 74
Lay descriptions of insanityp. 76
Expert knowledgep. 82
First-hand accounts of mental breakdownp. 84
Writing to and from the Asylump. 88
Traces of emotion in patient case recordsp. 94
Family and patient correspondencep. 99
The asylum as a 'theatre of emotions' for familiesp. 102
Tracing Families for Maintenance Paymentsp. 107
Asylum patient maintenance costs in the colonies, 1860s-1900sp. 109
Poverty, families and institutionsp. 113
'Tricks and subterfuges': deceiving authorities?p. 116
Family economies: money and emotionsp. 119
Porous Boundaries: Families, Patients and Practices of Extra-institutional Carep. 122
Trial leave and leave of absence: institutional practice across the coloniesp. 124
Boarding-outp. 137
The After Care Association, New South Wales, 1907p. 139
Conclusion: Families, Insanity and the Archivep. 143
Exploring the archivesp. 145
Locating familiesp. 150
Grappling with archival records: some conclusionsp. 151
Appendix: Indications of Insanity Noted by Family and Friends of Inmate Prior to Committalp. 154
Notesp. 156
Bibliographyp. 196
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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