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The ides : the murder of Julius Caesar /
Stephen Dando-Collins.
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley, c2010.
description
xv, 269 p.
ISBN
0470425237 (cloth : acid-free paper), 9780470425237 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley, c2010.
isbn
0470425237 (cloth : acid-free paper)
9780470425237 (cloth : acid-free paper)
catalogue key
7065815
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Sixty killers, wearing the purple-trimmed togas of Roman senators, unsheathed their hidden daggers to stab the most feared and powerful man in the Empire. Hundreds of their colleagues ran screaming from the Theater of Pompey the Great, proclaiming the bloody deed to the thousands of citizens who clogged the streets outside. It was the most public of crimes. Yet, two millennia after the murder of Julius Caesar, many questions remain unanswered. Was Brutus a treasonous villain or a hero of Rome? Were the killers motivated by noble sentiment or venality? Why did so many of Caesar's formerly loyal lieutenants take part in the murder? In The Ides, celebrated author and classical researcher Stephen Dando-Collins transports you to the streets, palaces, and gathering places of ancient Rome to experience a richly detailed, convincingly accurate, and stunningly suspenseful account of Caesar's final days. He traces the conspiracy that brought the conqueror down, from a surprising holiday meeting between Cassius and Brutus to its chaotic conclusion and beyond. Drawing deeply from ancient manuscripts, Dando-Collins documents Caesar's campaign to persuade the Senate, which had already declared him a "living god," to appoint him king of Rome before his planned departure on a military mission on March 19, 44 b.c. He reveals why many Romans already considered Caesar a tyrant and why Brutus, who may well have been Caesar's illegitimate son, felt a special obligation to depose this man who would be king. This compelling history follows the mercurial Cassius and even-tempered Brutus as they carefully feel out potential co-conspirators, knowing that one wrong choice could be their last. It reveals the dramatic lengths to which Brutus's wife Porcia went to prove he could trust her with his secret; why Caesar, even as the killers paced in restless anticipation of his arrival, canceled the Senate session he had called; and how a close associate convinced him to change his mind. Complete with a thoughtful analysis of why the plotters failed in their aim to restore the Republic and a chilling account of the deadly power struggles that continued for years after Caesar's death, The Ides is "must reading" for anyone fascinated with the Roman Empire, military history, and an incredibly good tale well told.
Flap Copy
Sixty killers, wearing the purple-trimmed togas of Roman senators, unsheathed their hidden daggers to stab the most feared and powerful man in the Empire. Hundreds of their colleagues ran screaming from the Theater of Pompey the Great, proclaiming the bloody deed to the thousands of citizens who clogged the streets outside. It was the most public of crimes. Yet, two millennia after the murder of Julius Caesar, many questions remain unanswered. Was Brutus a treasonous villain or a hero of Rome? Were the killers motivated by noble sentiment or venality? Why did so many of Caesar's formerly loyal lieutenants take part in the murder?In The Ides, celebrated author and classical researcher Stephen Dando-Collins transports you to the streets, palaces, and gathering places of ancient Rome to experience a richly detailed, convincingly accurate, and stunningly suspenseful account of Caesar's final days. He traces the conspiracy that brought the conqueror down, from a surprising holiday meeting between Cassius and Brutus to its chaotic conclusion and beyond.Drawing deeply from ancient manuscripts, Dando-Collins documents Caesar's campaign to persuade the Senate, which had already declared him a "living god," to appoint him king of Rome before his planned departure on a military mission on March 19, 44 b.c. He reveals why many Romans already considered Caesar a tyrant and why Brutus, who may well have been Caesar's illegitimate son, felt a special obligation to depose this man who would be king.This compelling history follows the mercurial Cassius and even-tempered Brutus as they carefully feel out potential co-conspirators, knowing that one wrong choice could be their last. It reveals the dramatic lengths to which Brutus's wife Porcia went to prove he could trust her with his secret; why Caesar, even as the killers paced in restless anticipation of his arrival, canceled the Senate session he had called; and how a close associate convinced him to change his mind.Complete with a thoughtful analysis of why the plotters failed in their aim to restore the Republic and a chilling account of the deadly power struggles that continued for years after Caesar's death, The Ides is "must reading" for anyone fascinated with the Roman Empire, military history, and an incredibly good tale well told.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2009-12-21:
Trying to clear away the "twaddle" that surrounds Julius Caesar, Dando-Collins (Caesar's Legion) provides a page-turner of a history describing step-by-step the events leading to the assassination of Julius Caesar and the impact of his removal on the collapse of the Roman Republic. Caesar's rise to power and his limitless ambitionposed an immediate threat to the survival of the Republic, which caused fear and consternation in those, such as Marcus Brutus, who nobly wished to defend Roman democracy. Brutus and his fellow senator Cassius planned the assassination and, with the help of yet other senators, carried it out on March 15, 44 B.C.E. Public sentiment originally favored the Liberators, as the assassins were known, but, thanks to the scheming of Marc Antony and the fickleness of the crowds, Brutus, Cassius, and others were forced to flee the city. In the months that followed, Antony and his sometime ally, Caesar's heir, Octavian, destroyed the Liberatorsonly to later wage war against each other. Antony's ultimate defeat led to Octavian's installation as the first emperor, Augustus Caesar. The dramatic story examines the roles of soldiers, politicians, philosophers, wives, and mistresses with perhaps too much emphasis placed on the ever-popular Cleopatra. 2 maps. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-01-01:
A remarkably well-documented conspiracy led up to the assassination of Roman dictator Gaius Julius Caesar at a meeting of the Senate in Pompey's Theater in Rome on March 15, 44 B.C.E. Starting his narrative in January and setting the stages of conspiracy in the context of the seasonal religious festivals of the Roman calendar, Roman military historian Dando-Collins (Blood of the Caesars: How the Murder of Germanicus Led to the Fall of Rome) combs the historical record to narrate day by day the development of the plot to kill the dictator and restore republican government under the leadership of Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. Instead of returning Rome to republican government, the bloody stabbing unleashed a bitter civil war in which sometime allies Mark Antony and Augustus Caesar eventually overwhelmed the conspirators, permanently ending democratic government in Rome. VERDICT Dando-Collins's day-by-day approach suits the events leading up to Caesar's death but works less well in detailing the unhappy aftermath of the conspirators over the course of many years and into farflung regions. Despite a flagging second half, this work is recommended for all readers seeking a lively introduction to a turning point in Roman history.-Stewart Desmond, New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Trying to clear away the "twaddle" that surrounds Julius Caesar, Dando-Collins ( Caesar's Legion) provides a page-turner of a history describing step-by-step the events leading to the assassination of Julius Caesar and the impact of his removal on the collapse of the Roman Republic. Caesar's rise to power and his limitless ambition posed an immediate threat to the survival of the Republic, which caused fear and consternation in those, such as Marcus Brutus, who nobly wished to defend Roman democracy. Brutus and his fellow senator Cassius planned the assassination and, with the help of yet other senators, carried it out on March 15, 44 B.C.E. Public sentiment originally favored the Liberators, as the assassins were known, but, thanks to the scheming of Marc Antony and the fickleness of the crowds, Brutus, Cassius, and others were forced to flee the city. In the months that followed, Antony and his sometime ally, Caesar's heir, Octavian, destroyed the Liberators only to later wage war against each other. Antony's ultimate defeat led to Octavian's installation as the first emperor, Augustus Caesar. The dramatic story examines the roles of soldiers, politicians, philosophers, wives, and mistresses with perhaps too much emphasis placed on the ever-popular Cleopatra. 2 maps. (Feb.) ( Publishers Weekly, December 21, 2009)
Trying to clear away the "twaddle" that surrounds Julius Caesar, Dando-Collins (Caesar's Legion) provides a page-turner of a history describing step-by-step the events leading to the assassination of Julius Caesar and the impact of his removal on the collapse of the Roman Republic. Caesar's rise to power and his limitless ambition posed an immediate threat to the survival of the Republic, which caused fear and consternation in those, such as Marcus Brutus, who nobly wished to defend Roman democracy. Brutus and his fellow senator Cassius planned the assassination and, with the help of yet other senators, carried it out on March 15, 44 B.C.E. Public sentiment originally favored the Liberators, as the assassins were known, but, thanks to the scheming of Marc Antony and the fickleness of the crowds, Brutus, Cassius, and others were forced to flee the city. In the months that followed, Antony and his sometime ally, Caesar's heir, Octavian, destroyed the Liberators only to later wage war against each other. Antony's ultimate defeat led to Octavian's installation as the first emperor, Augustus Caesar. The dramatic story examines the roles of soldiers, politicians, philosophers, wives, and mistresses with perhaps too much emphasis placed on the ever-popular Cleopatra. 2 maps. (Feb.) (Publishers Weekly, December 21, 2009)
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, December 2009
Library Journal, January 2010
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Unraveling the many mysteries surrounding the murder of Julius Caesar The assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Two thousand years after it occurred, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring about his own death by planning to make himself king of Rome? Was Mark Antony aware of the plot, and did he let it go forward? Who wrote Antony's script after Caesar's death? Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian and award-winning author Stephen Dando-Collins takes you to the world of ancient Rome and recaptures the drama of Caesar's demise and the chaotic aftermath as the vicious struggle for power between Antony and Octavian unfolded. For the first time, he shows how the religious festivals and customs of the day affected the way the assassination plot unfolded. He shows, too, how the murder was almost avoided at the last moment. Praise for Stephen Dando-Collins "Absorbing . . . Military history is the muscle of this book, with enough political sinews to give it coherence." -The Washington Times on Caesar's Legion "The meticulous research and racy writing style make this a fascinating and revealing book." -The Good Book Guide on Cleopatra's Kidnappers "Cleverly structured and well paced." -The Age on Nero's Killing Machine "A tough, gritty chronicle." -Booklist on Mark Antony's Heroes "A work to keep you fascinated, and to make you wonder at the web of deceit that could occur in Rome." -BBC History Magazine on Blood of the Caesars
Back Cover Copy
Unraveling the many mysteries surrounding the murder of Julius CaesarThe assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Two thousand years after it occurred, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring about his own death by planning to make himself king of Rome? Was Mark Antony aware of the plot, and did he let it go forward? Who wrote Antony's script after Caesar's death? Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian and award-winning author Stephen Dando-Collins takes you to the world of ancient Rome and recaptures the drama of Caesar's demise and the chaotic aftermath as the vicious struggle for power between Antony and Octavian unfolded. For the first time, he shows how the religious festivals and customs of the day affected the way the assassination plot unfolded. He shows, too, how the murder was almost avoided at the last moment.Praise for Stephen Dando-Collins"Absorbing . . . Military history is the muscle of this book, with enough political sinews to give it coherence." -The Washington Times on Caesar's Legion"The meticulous research and racy writing style make this a fascinating and revealing book." -The Good Book Guide on Cleopatra's Kidnappers"Cleverly structured and well paced." -The Age on Nero's Killing Machine"A tough, gritty chronicle." -Booklist on Mark Antony's Heroes"A work to keep you fascinated, and to make you wonder at the web of deceit that could occur in Rome." -BBC History Magazine on Blood of the Caesars
Bowker Data Service Summary
2000 years after Caesar's murder, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring death on himself by planning to make himself king of Rome? Using historical evidence, Stephen Dando-Collins explores these questions and more.
Main Description
Unraveling the many mysteries surrounding the murder of Julius Caesar The assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Two thousand years after it occurred, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring death on himself by planning to make himself king of Rome? Was Mark Antony aware of the plot, and let it go forward? Who wrote Antony's script after Caesar's death? Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian and award-winning author Stephen Dando-Collins takes you to the world of ancient Rome and recaptures the drama of Caesar's demise and the chaotic aftermath as the vicious struggle for power between Antony and Octavian unfolded. For the first time, he shows how the religious festivals and customs of the day impacted on the way the assassination plot unfolded. He shows, too, how the murder was almost avoided at the last moment. A compelling history that is packed with intrigue and written with the pacing of a first-rate mystery, The Ides will challenge what you think you know about Julius Caesar and the Roman Empire.
Main Description
Unraveling the many mysteries surrounding the murder of Julius CaesarThe assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Two thousand years after it occurred, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring death on himself by planning to make himself king of Rome? Was Mark Antony aware of the plot, and let it go forward? Who wrote Antony's script after Caesar's death? Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian and award-winning author Stephen Dando-Collins takes you to the world of ancient Rome and recaptures the drama of Caesar's demise and the chaotic aftermath as the vicious struggle for power between Antony and Octavian unfolded. For the first time, he shows how the religious festivals and customs of the day impacted on the way the assassination plot unfolded. He shows, too, how the murder was almost avoided at the last moment.A compelling history that is packed with intrigue and written with the pacing of a first-rate mystery, The Ides will challenge what you think you know about Julius Caesar and the Roman Empire.
Main Description
Unraveling the many mysteries surrounding the murder of Julius CaesarThe assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Two thousand years after it occurred, many compelling questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Did Caesar bring death on himself by planning to make himself king of Rome? Who wrote Anthony's script after Caesar's death? Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian and author Stephen Dando-Collins takes you to the world of Ancient Rome and recaptures the drama of Caesar's demise and its aftermath. Uses contemporary accounts to answer the many unanswered questions surrounding the murder of Julius Caesar Written by Stephen Dando-Collins, a historian and author who has studied ancient Rome for decades Other titles by Stephen Dando-Collins: Blood of the Caesars, Mark Antony's Herious, Caesar's Legion, Nero's Killing Machine, and Cleopatra's KidnappersA compelling history that is packed with intrigue and written with the pacing of a first-rate mystery, The Ides of March will challenge what you think you know about Julius Caesar and the Roman Empire.
Table of Contents
Atlas
Author's Note
Introduction'
The Conspiracy
January 26, 44 b.c.: Seven Weeks before the Assassination
February 15, 44 b.c.: The Lupercalia
February 22, 44 b.c.: The Caristia Reconciliation
February 24, 44 b.c.: Pressuring Brutus
March 1, 44 b.c., The Kalends of March: Dictator for Life
March 2, 44 b.c.: Recruiting Fellow Assassins
March 7, 44 b.c.: A Visit from One of Caesar's Generals
March 9, 44 b.c.: Porcia's Secret
March 14, 44 b.c., Afternoon: Cleopatra and the Equirria
March 14, 44 b.c., Evening: The Best Sort of Death
The Murder
March 15, 44 b.c.: The Ides of March: Caesar Awakens
March 15, 44 b.c.: The Ides of March: In the Dark before Dawn
March 15, 44 b.c., The Ides of March: Caesar Must Suffer Caesar's Fate
March 15, 44 b.c., The Ides of March: The Crime
March 15, 44 b.c.: The Gathering Storm
Aftermath and Retribution
March 16, 44 b.c.: Pleading for the Republic
March 17, 44 b.c.: The Jostle for Control
March 18, 44 b.c.: The Liberators Gain the Advantage
March 19, 44 b.c.: Caesar's Will
March 20, 44 b.c.: Caesar's Funeral
March 21, 44 b.c.: Antony Consolidates His Grip
March 24, 44 b.c.: Enter Octavius
March 27, 44 b.c.: The Name of Caesar
April 7, 44 b.c.: Wise Oppius
April 10, 44 b.c.: Caesar's Heir
April 11, 44 b.c.: Octavian Meets with Antony
April 14, 44 b.c.: The Aedile's Refusal
April 22, 44 b.c.: Octavian Seeks Cicero's Support
May 11, 44 b.c.: I Don't Trust Him a Yard
May 18, 44 b.c.: Undermining Antony
May 31, 44 b.c.: Reforming the Praetorian Cohorts
June 2, 44 b.c.: Antony Outsmarts the Senate
June 7, 44 b.c.: No Plan, No Thought, No Method
July 13, 44 b.c.: The Last Day of Brutus's Games
July 20, 44 b.c.: The Liberators' Manifesto
July 28, 44 b.c.: Cicero's Departure
August 16, 44 b.c.: Like Hector the Hero
August 30, 44 b.c.: Cicero Returns to Rome
September 15, 44 b.c.: The Liberators Reach Greece
September 23, 44 b.c.: Octavian's Nineteenth Birthday
September 28, 44 b.c.: The Plot to Assassinate Antony
October 9, 44 b.c.: A Dreadful State of Affairs
October 18, 44 b.c.: Antony Joins His Legions
November 4, 44 b.c.: Octavian Recruits an Army
November 18, 44 b.c.: The Road to War
November 27-30, 44 b.c.: Anthony's Legions Rebel
Early December 44 b.c.: The Rise of the Liberators
Second Half of December 44 b.c.: Antony Makes His Move
January 1-4, 43 b.c.: Debating Antony's Fate
Late December 44 b.c.-Early January 43 b.c.: The First Assassin to Fall
February 4, 43 b.c.: State of Emergency
April 14-26, 43 b.c.: The Mutina Battles
May 7, 43 b.c.: Cassius Overruns Syria
May 30, 43 b.c.: Lepidus's Betrayal
August 19, 43 b.c.: Octavian Charges Caesar's Murderers
Early November 43 b.c.: The Triumvirate and the Proscription
December 7, 43 b.c.: Killing Cicero
October 1-21, 42 b.c.: The Battles of Philippi
Judging the Assassins and the Victim
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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