Catalogue


The 1926 miners' lockout [electronic resource] : meanings of community in the Durham coalfield /
Hester Barron.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xv, 314 p. : ill., map ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780199575046 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
9780199575046 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
The miners' lockout of 1926 was a pivotal moment in British 20th century history. Investigating issues of collective identity & action, Hester Barron explores the way that the lockout was experienced by Durham's miners & their families, illuminating wider debates about solidarity & fragmentation within working-class communities.
catalogue key
7065279
 
Electronic reproduction. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. (Oxford Scholarship Online). Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Internet Explorer 6.0 (or higher) or Firefox 2.0 (or higher). Available as searchable text in HTML format. Access restricted to subscribing institutions.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
an excellent monograph on the coal lockout in the Durham coalfield ... a rich tapestry
"Excellent." --American Historical Review
"Excellent." --American Historical Review "An insightful, fascinating study that deserves a wide readership." --Journal of British Studies
"The 1926 Miners Lockoutis a rewarding example of classic social history...In an age in which historians are urged to invest in global history,The 1926 Miners Lockoutvindicates the particularity and power of place, the specificity of experience, and the potency of micronarratives that relate to wider concerns. Despite prognostications of decline, this book suggests that social history still has a kick in it." --The Journal of Modern History "Excellent." --American Historical Review "An insightful, fascinating study that deserves a wide readership." --Journal of British Studies
The 1926 Miners' Lockout represents a significant contribution to mining and regional historiography; it also demonstrates how innovative exploration of traditional topics can revitalise and refurbish labour and working-class history.
This is a deeply impressive book. Thoroughly researched, clearly written, and coping well with contradiction and complexity, as an exercise in labour history is it a model for our identity-consciounes age.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The miners' lockout of 1926 was a pivotal moment in British 20th century history. Investigating issues of collective identity & action, Hester Barron explores the way that the lockout was experienced by Durham's miners & their families, illuminating wider debates about solidarity & fragmentation within working-class communities.
Long Description
The miners' lockout of 1926 was a pivotal moment in British twentieth-century history. Opening with the heady days of the general strike, it continued for seven months and affected one million miners. In County Durham, where almost three in every ten adult men worked in the coal industry, its impact was profound. Hester Barron explores the way that the lockout was experienced by Durham's miners and their families. She investigates collective values and behaviour, focusing particularly on the tensions between identities based around class and occupation, and the rival identities that could cut across the creation of a cohesive community. Highlighting the continuing importance of differences due to gender, age, religion, poverty, and individual hopes and aspirations, she nevertheless finds that in 1926,despite such differences, the Durham coalfield continued to display the solidarity for which miners were famed. In response, Barron argues that the very concept of the 'mining community' needs to be reassessed. Rather than consisting of an homogeneous occupational identity, she suggests that the essence of community lay in its ability to subsume and integrate other categories of identity. A collective consciousness was further grounded in a shared historical narrative that had to be continually reinforced. It was the strength of such local solidarities that enabled both an exemplary regional response to the strike, and the ability to conceptualise such action within the wider framework of the national union. The 1926 Miners' Lockout provides crucial insights into issues of collective identity and collective action, illuminating wider debates about solidarity and fragmentation within working-class communities and cultures.
Main Description
The miners' lockout of 1926 was a pivotal moment in British twentieth-century history. Opening with the heady days of the general strike, it continued for seven months and affected one million miners. In County Durham, where almost three in every ten adult men worked in the coal industry, its impact was profound. Hester Barron explores the way that the lockout was experienced by Durham's miners and their families. She investigates collective values and behavior, focusing particularly on the tensions between identities based around class and occupation, and the rival identities that could cut across the creation of a cohesive community. Highlighting the continuing importance of differences due to gender, age, religion, poverty, and individual hopes and aspirations, she nevertheless finds that in 1926, despite such differences, the Durham coalfield continued to display the solidarity for which miners were famed. In response, Barron argues that the very concept of the "mining community" needs to be reassessed. Rather than consisting of an homogeneous occupational identity, she suggests that the essence of community lay in its ability to subsume and integrate other categories of identity. A collective consciousness was further grounded in a shared historical narrative that had to be continually reinforced. It was the strength of such local solidarities that enabled both an exemplary regional response to the strike, and the ability to conceptualize such action within the wider framework of the national union. The 1926 Miners' Lockout provides crucial insights into issues of collective identity and collective action, illuminating wider debates about solidarity and fragmentation within working-class communities and cultures.
Main Description
The miners' lockout of 1926 was a pivotal moment in British twentieth-century history. Opening with the heady days of the general strike, it continued for seven months and affected one million miners. In County Durham, where almost three in every ten adult men worked in the coal industry, its impact was profound. Hester Barron explores the way that the lockout was experienced by Durham's miners and their families. She investigates collective values and behavior, focusing particularly on the tensions between identities based around class and occupation, and the rival identities that could cut across the creation of a cohesive community. Highlighting the continuing importance of differences due to gender, age, religion, poverty, and individual hopes and aspirations, she nevertheless finds that in 1926, despite such differences, the Durham coalfield continued to display the solidarity for which miners were famed. In response, Barron argues that the very concept of the "mining community" needs to be reassessed. Rather than consisting of an homogeneous occupational identity, she suggests that the essence of community lay in its ability to subsume and integrate other categories of identity. A collective consciousness was further grounded in a shared historical narrative that had to be continually reinforced. It was the strength of such local solidarities that enabled both an exemplary regional response to the strike, and the ability to conceptualize such action within the wider framework of the national union.The 1926 Miners' Lockoutprovides crucial insights into issues of collective identity and collective action, illuminating wider debates about solidarity and fragmentation within working-class communities and cultures.
Main Description
The miners' lockout of 1926 was a pivotal moment in British twentieth-century history. Opening with the heady days of the general strike, it continued for seven months and affected one million miners. In County Durham, where almost three in every ten adult men worked in the coal industry, itsimpact was profound. Hester Barron explores the way that the lockout was experienced by Durham's miners and their families. She investigates collective values and behaviour, focusing particularly on the tensions between identities based around class and occupation, and the rival identities that could cut across thecreation of a cohesive community. Highlighting the continuing importance of differences due to gender, age, religion, poverty, and individual hopes and aspirations, she nevertheless finds that in 1926, despite such differences, the Durham coalfield continued to display the solidarity for whichminers were famed. In response, Barron argues that the very concept of the 'mining community' needs to be reassessed. Rather than consisting of an homogeneous occupational identity, she suggests that the essence of community lay in its ability to subsume and integrate other categories of identity. A collectiveconsciousness was further grounded in a shared historical narrative that had to be continually reinforced. It was the strength of such local solidarities that enabled both an exemplary regional response to the strike, and the ability to conceptualise such action within the wider framework of the national union. The 1926 Miners' Lockout provides crucial insights into issues of collective identity andcollective action, illuminating wider debates about solidarity and fragmentation within working-class communities and cultures.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Tensions of Class and Region
The Testing of Political and Union Loyalties
The Attitudes of Women
Religious Identities
The Influence of Education
Memory and Experience
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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