Catalogue


Mock-epic poetry from Pope to Heine [electronic resource] /
Ritchie Robertson.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009.
description
456 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780199571581
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009.
isbn
9780199571581
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
This is a study of 18th- and early 19th-century poetry in English, French and German, focusing on the mock epic (from Pope's 'Dunciad' to Byron's 'Don Juan') as a critique of serious epic poetry and also as a literary means of exploring a wide range of sexual and religious issues in a humourous style.
catalogue key
7065261
 
Electronic reproduction. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010. (Oxford Scholarship Online). Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Internet Explorer 6.0 (or higher) or Firefox 2.0 (or higher). Available as searchable text in HTML format. Access restricted to subscribing institutions.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-05-01:
Robertson (German, St. John's College, Oxford) here produces old-fashioned literary history of the best sort: gracefully written, formidably learned (in terms of English and French literature, as well as German), and genuinely useful. One might quibble with the author's initial distinction between "mock heroic" (which still values epic as the highest genre) and "mock epic" (which does not), or with his selection of texts on which to focus (why not John Dryden's Mac Flecknoe?). But the chapters on much-studied works (Pope's Dunciad, Voltaire's Pucelle, Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea, Byron's Don Juan) offer new insights, and those on less-known works (J. F. Ratschky's Melchior Striegel, Aloys Blumauer's travesty of Virgil, Evariste Parny's La Guerre des dieux, Heinrich Heine's Atta Troll) are stunningly informative. An introduction deftly traces mock-heroic from antiquity to Ariosto and Tasso; an epilogue speculates about the form's afterlife in Carl Spitteler, Franz Kafka, and James Joyce. Though Robinson writes with enough verve and clarity to engage novices, this splendid book also has much to teach graduate students and faculty. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. D. L. Patey Smith College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Gracefully written, formidably learned...and genuinely useful...The chapters on much-studied works (Pope's Dunciad , Voltaire's Pucelle , Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea , Byron's Don Juan ) offer new insights, and those on less-known works (J. F. Ratschky's Melchior Striegel , Aloys Blumauer's travesty of Virgil, Evariste Parny's La Guerre des dieux , Heinrich Heine's Atta Troll ) are stunningly informative." -- Choice
"Gracefully written, formidably learned...and genuinely useful...The chapters on much-studied works (Pope'sDunciad, Voltaire'sPucelle, Goethe'sHermann and Dorothea, Byron'sDon Juan) offer new insights, and those on less-known works (J. F. Ratschky'sMelchior Striegel, Aloys Blumauer's travesty of Virgil, Evariste Parny'sLa Guerre des dieux, Heinrich Heine'sAtta Troll) are stunningly informative." --Choice
Robertson's command of his vast range of primary sources is astonishing, as is the extent of his scholarly work on the associated questions he explores.
Wonderful: lucid, intelligent, and wide-ranging... Mock-Epic Poetry: from Pope to Heine is unlike most academic studies, and that is a good thing. Because Robertson's frame of reference is so broad, he patiently builds up a portrait of each text, offering bibliographical and critical contexts before proceeding to analysis. This adds to the book's bulk, but makes it a pleasure to read - and it means that it will be accessible to students of English and Classics as well asModern Languages. It has two outstanding qualities. First, it makes an eloquent case for the interconnectedness of European literatures in the later eighteenth century. Second, it reminds readers of the pleasures of intertextuality.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of 18th- and early 19th-century poetry in English, French and German, focusing on the mock epic (from Pope's 'Dunciad' to Byron's 'Don Juan') as a critique of serious epic poetry and also as a literary means of exploring a wide range of sexual and religious issues in a humourous style.
Main Description
This is a study of mock-epic poetry in English, French, and German from the 1720s to the 1840s. While mock-heroic poetry is a parodistic counterpart to serious epic, mock-epic poetry starts by parodying epic but moves on to much wider and richer literary explorations; it relies heavily on intertextual allusion to other works, on narratorial irony, on the sympathetic and sometimes libertine presentation of sexual relations, and on a range of satirical devices. It includes well-known texts (Pope's Dunciad , Byron's Don Juan , Heine's Atta Troll ) and others which are little known (Ratschky's Melchior Striregel , Parny's La Guerre des Dieux ). It owes a marked debt to Italian romance epic (especially Ariosto). The study places these texts in the literary context of the decline of serious epic, which helped mock epic to flourish, and of the 'Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes' which questioned the authority of Homer's and Virgil's epics; and it relates their substance to contemporary debates about questions of religion and gender.
Main Description
This is a study of mock-epic poetry in English, French, and German from the 1720s to the 1840s. While mock-heroic poetry is a parodistic counterpart to serious epic, mock-epic poetry starts by parodying epic but moves on to much wider and richer literary explorations; it relies heavily on intertextual allusion to other works, on narratorial irony, on the sympathetic and sometimes libertine presentation of sexual relations, and on a range of satirical devices. It includes well-known texts (Pope's Dunciad, Byron's Don Juan, Heine's Atta Troll) and others which are little known (Ratschky's Melchior Striregel, Parny's La Guerre des Dieux). It owes a marked debt to Italian romance epic (especially Ariosto). The study places these texts in the literary context of the decline of serious epic, which helped mock epic to flourish, and of the 'Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes' which questioned the authority of Homer's and Virgil's epics; and it relates their substance to contemporary debates about questions of religion and gender.
Main Description
This is a study of mock-epic poetry in English, French, and German from the 1720s to the 1840s. While mock-heroic poetry is a parodistic counterpart to serious epic, mock-epic poetry starts by parodying epic but moves on to much wider and richer literary explorations; it relies heavily on intertextual allusion to other works, on narratorial irony, on the sympathetic and sometimes libertine presentation of sexual relatons, and on a range of satirical devices. It includes well-known texts (Pope's Dunciad, Byron's Don Juan, Heine's Atta Troll) and others which are little known (Ratschky's Melchior Striregel, Parny's La Guerre des Dieux). It owes a marked debt to Italian romance epic (especially Ariosto). The study places these texts in the literary context of the decline of serious epic, which helped mock epic to flourish, and of the 'Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes' which questioned the authority of Homer's and Virgil's epics; and it relates their substance to contemporarydebates about questions of religion and gender.
Main Description
This is a study of mock-epic poetry in English, French, and German from the 1720s to the 1840s. While mock-heroic poetry is a parodistic counterpart to serious epic, mock-epic poetry starts by parodying epic but moves on to much wider and richer literary explorations; it relies heavily onintertextual allusion to other works, on narratorial irony, on the sympathetic and sometimes libertine presentation of sexual relatons, and on a range of satirical devices. It includes well-known texts (Pope's Dunciad, Byron's Don Juan, Heine's Atta Troll) and others which are little known(Ratschky's Melchior Striregel, Parny's La Guerre des Dieux). It owes a marked debt to Italian romance epic (especially Ariosto). The study places these texts in the literary context of the decline of serious epic, which helped mock epic to flourish, and of the 'Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes'which questioned the authority of Homer's and Virgil's epics; and it relates their substance to contemporary debates about questions of religion and gender.

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