Catalogue


The arts of industry in the Age of Enlightenment /
Celina Fox.
imprint
New Haven : Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press, c2009.
description
vii, 576 p. : ill. (some col.)
ISBN
0300160429 (cl : alk. paper), 9780300160420 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
New Haven : Published for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press, c2009.
isbn
0300160429 (cl : alk. paper)
9780300160420 (cl : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7061201
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-08-01:
The relationship between the fine and applied arts, between knowledge at once "disinterested" and practical, between the mind and the hand, preoccupied 18th-century British thinkers as they sought to disseminate the information of progress. A variation on this subject appeared recently in Andrew Saint's Architect and Engineer (CH, Sep'08, 46-0092), but Fox, in this weighty book, focuses on the Enlightenment, a time of unprecedented scientific and technological development. Fox studies several broad categories--the history and nature of the trades, drawing and engraving used to transmit ever more accurate information, the construction of ingenious models, publications (including encyclopedias), and learned organizations (particularly the Society of Arts). Additionally, portraits of inventors underscored the sitter's commitment to the "public good," and canvases included busy shops and smoking mills in a landscape undergoing rapid change. Fox's study of the 18th century is thorough and impressive, but her final section on the early 19th century is less assured. Extensive endnotes reveal an imposing array of primary material and a close reading of most of the relevant scholarship. The volume features over 200 fine illustrations, many in good color. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above; primarily for specialists. W. S. Rodner Tidewater Community College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-05-01:
Fox, chair on the Blue Plaques Panel of English Heritage, former keeper of art at the Museum of London, and independent scholar and museums adviser, thoroughly surveys the connections among art, science, engineering, and British history in her latest work, published in association with the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art. She makes a case that fine arts and industrial arts experienced a false division over the years, and she harkens back to the time when arts and sciences were whole and all-inclusive. Through Fox's presentation of the history of trades and her explorations of drawings and models and their use in scientific societies, the reader relearns the intellectual and practical integration of art and design. Fox is utterly complete in her scope and encompasses all aspects of the theory and history of her subject. VERDICT Fox has provided scholars with a well-researched and definitive account of the relationship between art and science in 18th-century England.-Nadine Dalton Speidel, Cuyahoga Cty. P.L., Parma, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] remarkable book . . . an original account of the representation of the mechanical arts by both ''liberal'' and ''mechanical'' artists that is of extraodinary scope and depth. Fox makes an important contribution to literature in the history of science and technology that highlights the interaction between artisans and scholars in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. . . . Such a short review cannot do justice to the richness of the visual and verbal feast Fox sets before the reader, studded as it is with fascinating nuggets of information and visual discoveries."Pamela H. Smith, Technology and Culture
"Fox's study of the 18th century is thorough and impressive." Choice
Winner of the 2011 Historians of British Art Books Prize in the Pre-1800 category
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2010
Choice, August 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, Celina Fox argues that mechanics and artisans used four principal means to describe and rationalize their work: drawing, model-making, societies and publications. These channels provide the basis for experimentation and invention, explanation and classification and promotion and celebration.
Main Description
During the 18th century, the arts of industry encompassed both liberal and mechanical realms--not simply the representation of work in the fine art of painting, but the skills involved in the processes of industry itself. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, Celina Fox argues that mechanics and artisans used four principal means to describe and rationalize their work: drawing, model-making, societies, and publications. These four channels, which form the four central themes of this engrossing book, provided the basis for experimentation and invention, for explanation and classification, for validation and authorization, and for promotion and celebration, thus bringing them into the public domain and achieving progress as a true part of the Enlightenment.
Main Description
During the 18th century, the arts of industry encompassed both liberal and mechanical realmsnot simply the representation of work in the fine art of painting, but the skills involved in the processes of industry itself. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, Celina Fox argues that mechanics and artisans used four principal means to describe and rationalize their work: drawing, model-making, societies, and publications. These four channels, which form the four central themes of this engrossing book, provided the basis for experimentation and invention, for explanation and classification, for validation and authorization, and for promotion and celebration, thus bringing them into the public domain and achieving progress as a true part of the Enlightenment.

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