Catalogue


Civil society and empire : Ireland and Scotland in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world /
James Livesey.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
description
x, 294 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0300139020 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780300139020 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
isbn
0300139020 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780300139020 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Civil society and the eighteenth-century Atlantic world -- Coffee, association, and cultural hybridity in seventeenth-century England -- Improvement and the discourse of society in eighteenth-century Ireland -- The authority of the defeated : catholic languages of the moral order in the eighteenth century -- The experience of empire : the black family, Britons, and the emergence of society -- A habitat for hopeful monsters : David Hume and the Scottish theorists of civil society -- Society and empire in revolution : Ireland and Britain in the 1790s.
catalogue key
7058451
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-05-01:
Livesey (Univ. of Sussex, UK) takes on the history of the idea of civil society. The notion of civil society itself emerged in the modern era, and continues to be one of the most important concepts in political theory. The author's goal is to give a historical account of how this emergence came about. He argues that the idea of civil society has its origins in the 18th-century British Atlantic during the rise of the commercial state and the strength of empire. Although he affixes a specific geographic and cultural point to such a broad idea, the author cannot be accused of parochialism. His argument is thorough and convincing. The story is complex and adroitly woven. It is ambitious in scope. His analysis spans political theory, economic history, and an analysis of culture, but this is decidedly a work of history, and a very good one. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. D. M. Judd William Paterson University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book is infused with intellectual energy, fresh ideas, new perspectives and bold juxtapositions [�] a project ripe with originality and promise."�James Smyth, University of Notre Dame
"This book is infused with intellectual energy, fresh ideas, new perspectives and bold juxtapositions [.] a project ripe with originality and promise."-James Smyth, University of Notre Dame
"This book is a powerful, intellectually engaged, and sophisticated reading of the intertwining histories of Ireland, Scotland, and England in the eighteenth century."-Toby Barnard, Oxford University
"This book is a powerful, intellectually engaged, and sophisticated reading of the intertwining histories of Ireland, Scotland, and England in the eighteenth century."Toby Barnard, Oxford University
�This book is a powerful, intellectually engaged, and sophisticated reading of the intertwining histories of Ireland, Scotland, and England in the eighteenth century.��Toby Barnard, Oxford University
"This book is infused with intellectual energy, fresh ideas, new perspectives and bold juxtapositions [...] a project ripe with originality and promise."James Smyth, University of Notre Dame
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Livesey traces the origins of the modern conceptions of civil society to Ireland & Scotland during the 18th century, arguing that it was invented as an idea of renewed community for provincial & defeated élites to allow them to enjoy liberty without participating in governance.
Main Description
James Livesey traces the origins of the modern conception of civil society--an ideal of collective life between the family and politics--not to England or France, as many of his predecessors have done, but to the provincial societies of Ireland and Scotland in the eighteenth century. Livesey shows how civil society was first invented as an idea of renewed community for the provincial and defeated elites in the provinces of the British Empire and how this innovation allowed them to enjoy liberty without directly participating in the empire's governance, until the limits of the concept were revealed. The concept of civil society continues to have direct relevance for contemporary political theory and action. Livesey demonstrates how western governments, for example, have appealed to the values of civil society in their projections of power in Bosnia and Iraq. Civil society has become an object central to current ideological debate, and this book offers a thought-provoking discussion of its beginnings, objectives, and current nature.
Main Description
James Livesey traces the origins of the modern conception of civil societyan ideal of collective life between the family and politicsnot to England or France, as many of his predecessors have done, but to the provincial societies of Ireland and Scotland in the eighteenth century. Livesey shows how civil society was first invented as an idea of renewed community for the provincial and defeated elites in the provinces of the British Empire and how this innovation allowed them to enjoy liberty without directly participating in the empire's governance, until the limits of the concept were revealed. The concept of civil society continues to have direct relevance for contemporary political theory and action. Livesey demonstrates how western governments, for example, have appealed to the values of civil society in their projections of power in Bosnia and Iraq. Civil society has become an object central to current ideological debate, and this book offers a thought-provoking discussion of its beginnings, objectives, and current nature.

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