Catalogue

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Food will win the war : Minnesota crops, cooks, and conservation during World War I /
Rae Katherine Eighmey.
imprint
Saint Paul : Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2010.
description
xii, 259 p.
ISBN
0873517180 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780873517188 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Saint Paul : Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2010.
isbn
0873517180 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780873517188 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7055963
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Rae Katherine Eighmey is a food historian who has written several historical recipe books and coauthored Potluck Paradise: Favorite Fare from Church and Community Cookbooks. An avid foodie, she tested all the recipes in this book for modern kitchens.
Summaries
Main Description
Meatless Mondays, Wheatless Wednesdays, vegetable gardens and chickens in every empty lot and backyard. When the United States entered World War I, Minnesotans responded to appeals for personal sacrifice and changed the way they cooked and ate in order to conserve food for the boys "over there." Baking with corn and rye, eating simple meals based on locally grown food, consuming fewer calories, and wasting nothing in the kitchen-not even bread crumbs-became civic acts. High-energy foods and calories unconsumed on the American home front could help the food-starved, war-torn American Allies eat another day and fight another battle.
Main Description
Meatless Mondays, Wheatless Wednesdays, vegetable gardens and chickens in every empty lot. When the United States entered World War I, Minnesotans responded to appeals for personal sacrifice and changed the way they cooked and ate in order to conserve food for the boys "over there". Baking with corn and rye, eating simple meals based on locally grown food, consuming fewer calories, and wasting nothing in the kitchen became civic acts. High-energy foods and calories unconsumed on the American home front could help the food-starved, war-torn American Allies eat another day and fight another battle. Food historian Rae Katherine Eighmey engages readers with wide research and recipes drawn from rarely viewed letters, diaries, recipe books, newspaper accounts, government pamphlets, and public service fliers. She brings alive the unknown but unparalleled efforts to win the war made by ordinary "Citizen Soldiers" -- farmers and city dwellers, lumberjacks and homemakers -- who rolled up their sleeves to apply "can-do" ingenuity coupled with "must-do" drive. Their remarkable efforts transformed everyday life and set the stage for the United States' post-war economic and political ascendance.
Main Description
Meatless Mondays, Wheatless Wednesdays, vegetable gardens and chickens in every empty lot. When the United States entered World War I, Minnesotans responded to appeals for personal sacrifice and changed the way they cooked and ate in order to conserve food for the boys “over there.” Baking with corn and rye, eating simple meals based on locally grown food, consuming fewer calories, and wasting nothing in the kitchen became civic acts. High-energy foods and calories unconsumed on the American home front could help the food-starved, war-torn American Allies eat another day and fight another battle. Food historian Rae Katherine Eighmey engages readers with wide research and recipes drawn from rarely viewed letters, diaries, recipe books, newspaper accounts, government pamphlets, and public service fliers. She brings alive the unknown but unparalleled efforts to win the war made by ordinary “Citizen Soldiers”-farmers and city dwellers, lumberjacks and homemakers-who rolled up their sleeves to apply “can-do” ingenuity coupled with “must-do” drive. Their remarkable efforts transformed everyday life and set the stage for the United States’ postwar economic and political ascendance. Rae Katherine Eighmey is a food historian who has written several historical recipe books and coauthored Potluck Paradise: Favorite Fare from Church and Community Cookbooks . An avid foodie, she tested all the recipes in this book for modern kitchens.
Table of Contents
Appetizerp. ix
One Soldier's Familyp. 3
Menu for Successp. 15
The Staff of Life, the Stuff of Warp. 43
Homegrown Vegetables Year-roundp. 67
"Meating" the Challenges: More Meals from Lessp. 97
Milk Is Food: New Meals from Dairy and Coopp. 125
Are You Doing Your Part?p. 147
Every Spud a Soldier!p. 171
The Sweetness of Lifep. 183
Settling Up Accountsp. 205
Acknowledgmentsp. 211
Appendix: University of Minnesota Liberty Breadsp. 212
Appendix: Cost of Living in 1917-18p. 215
Timelinep. 217
Notesp. 221
Bibliographyp. 239
Recipe Indexp. 241
Subject Indexp. 244
Illustration Creditsp. 260
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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