Catalogue


Waging war in Waziristan : the British struggle in the land of Bin Laden, 1849-1947 /
Andrew M. Roe.
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2010.
description
ix, 313 p.
ISBN
0700616993 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780700616992 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2010.
isbn
0700616993 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780700616992 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The lay of the land: Waziristan's people, history, and terrain -- Blood for blood: the tribal culture of code -- Securing the frontier: politics, policy, and tribal realities -- The forward policies: British influence, political control, and the Maliki system -- 1930s Waziristan: the British administrative apparatus -- The mailed fist in the velvet glove: the army of India and the Royal Air Force -- A cause celebre, the Fakir of Ipi, and the British response -- Keeping the flame of insurrection alight, 1938-1947 -- The hard-earned lessons and realities of the British experience in Waziristan, Part 1 -- The hard-earned lessons and realities of the British experience in Waziristan, Part 2, -- Contemporary parallels and prognostications.
catalogue key
7042177
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-04-01:
Waziristan, in northwest Pakistan by the Afghanistan border, doesn't seem to have changed much from the 19th century, at least for invaders and foreign administrators-still violent, treacherous, devout, complex. Roe, a British officer currently serving in Afghanistan, argues in favor of considering history and culture in war there, pointing up the difficulties faced by Western forces. Recommended for readers in military or social history on the region. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, April 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Waziristan is a remote district of Pakistan populated by fiercely independent tribes who owe allegiance to no-one and unite only to repel invaders or wage jihad. Here, Roe captures the essence of Waziristan's tribal culture, explains how the British managed to contain this volatile area, and much more.
Main Description
Waziristan is a remote district of Pakistan populated by fiercely independent tribes who owe allegiance to no one and unite only to repel invaders or wage jihad. Its mountainous landscape is a natural fortress-sanctuary to the Taliban, probable refuge of Osama bin Laden, and widely regarded as the "epicenter of terrorism." Waziristan is as much a powder keg today as it was when India was part of the British Empire. It was here that the infamous Fakir of Ipi waged guerrilla warfare against the foreigners and evaded the 40,000 troops sent to capture him. In this very timely book, Andrew Roe captures the essence of Waziristans tribal culture, explains how the British managed to contain this volatile area, and provides new insight into why Bin Laden chose to hide there. Roe, a career soldier with on-the-ground experience in the region, distills the hard-earned lessons gained by the British. He explains how they sought to counter Russian expansionism in Central Asia, which was seen as a threat to tribal autonomy in Indias North-West Frontier; he then tells how they pursued a policy of containment rather than control by working through indigenous forces and utilizing a combination of incentives and force to subdue and appease the tribal areas. Roe persuasively argues that many of the measures that were effective in pacifying the region in the past are equally applicable today. He stresses the importance of using force as a last resort and of harmonizing political and military activities. His bottom line: the British solutions to similar problems in the same geographical area, even though from a different era, have considerable utility for todays policymakers and military commanders in this region. Offering valuable insights, Roes work shows how the British (long before "counterinsurgency doctrine" was embraced) grew to understand whom they were dealing with and what was possible and revised their aims accordingly-lessons the United States and its allies could well heed. At a time when the situation in southern Afghanistan is increasingly perilous, the British approach to tribal management offers useful guidance for the governments of Pakistan and Afghanistan and the international community in their attempts to deal with todays challenges.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Lay of the Land: Waziristan's People, History, and Terrainp. 15
Blood for Blood: The Tribal Culture of Codep. 39
Securing the Frontier: Politics, Policy, and Tribal Realitiesp. 60
The Forward Policies: British Influence, Political Control, and the Maliki Systemp. 83
1930s Waziristan: The British Administrative Apparatusp. 104
The Mailed Fist in the Velvet Glove: The Army of India and the Royal Air Forcep. 123
A Cause Célèbre, the Fakir of Ipi, and the British Response: The Trial Case of Islam Bibi and the 1936-1937 Campaignp. 155
Keeping the Flame of Insurrection Alight, 1938-1947p. 178
The Hard-Earned Lessons and Realities of the British Experience in Waziristan, Part 1p. 193
The Hard-Earned Lessons and Realities of the British Experience in Waziristan, Part 2p. 215
Contemporary Parallels and Prognosticationsp. 241
Notesp. 257
Selected Glossaryp. 293
Bibliographyp. 295
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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