Catalogue

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Jealousy /
Catherine Millet ; translated by Helen Stevenson.
imprint
London : Serpent's Tail, 2009.
description
185 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1846687187 (pbk.), 9781846687181 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Serpent's Tail, 2009.
isbn
1846687187 (pbk.)
9781846687181 (pbk.)
language note
Translated from the French.
catalogue key
7039002
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
New York Times Book Review, January 2010
Boston Globe, February 2010
Globe & Mail, February 2010
Los Angeles Times, February 2010
Washington Post, March 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
A Paperback Original'A painful, stifling, deeply moving love story. It is not the dark counterpart of The Sexual Life but rather its continuation' Le MondeAfter the pleasure comes the pain. Catherine Millet is one of the world's most infamous sexual libertines. In her huge international bestseller The Sexual Life of Catherine M, she explored all shades of sexual pleasure, both with and without her loving long-term partner Jacques Henric. And explired it so thoroughly and honestly that it seemed there were no taboos left to conquer.Until one day, when she discovered a letter lying around their apartment, from which it became clear that Jacques was involved elsewhere. Millet details the crisis provoked by this discovery and the paradoxical confession of a libertine, who succumbs to the 'timeless and universal malady' - the last taboo - Jealousy.Praise for The Sexual LIfe of Catherine M:'A book so rich in sexual revelation that it could feed five tabloids for a year and still have something left' Rowan Pelling'The most explicit book about sex ever written by a woman' Edmund White'A brilliant testimony of a life spent at the sexual front line' Independent on SundayTranslated by Helen Stevenson
Bowker Data Service Summary
An advocate of women's sexual liberation, Catherine Millet finds herself enslaved to sexual jealousy when her partner is unfaithful.
Main Description
After the pleasure comes the pain. The Sexual Life of Catherine M, Catherine Millet_s analysis of the many forms and flavours of sexual pleasure, was internationally admired, and not just for its literary qualities. The audacity of a sex life well lived and thoroughly examined left readers wondering how she managed to pull it off while sustaining her relationship with life partner, writer Jacques Henric. _I had love at home_ she explained. _I sought only pleasure in the world outside_.Then one day she discovered a letter lying about the apartment, from which it became clear that Jacques was involved elsewhere. Jealousy details the crisis provoked by this discovery and her reaction to it. If The Sexual Life of Catherine M seemed to disregard emotion, Jealousy is its radical complement: the paradoxical confession of a libertine, who succumbs to the 'timeless and universal malady'.
Main Description
After the pleasure comes the pain. The Sexual Life of Catherine M, Catherine Millet's analysis of the many forms and flavours of sexual pleasure, was internationally admired, and not just for its literary qualities. The audacity of a sex life well lived and thoroughly examined left readers wondering how she managed to pull it off while sustaining her relationship with life partner, writer Jacques Henric. 'I had love at home' she explained. 'I sought only pleasure in the world outside'. Then one day she discovered a letter lying about the apartment, from which it became clear that Jacques was involved elsewhere. Jealousy details the crisis provoked by this discovery and her reaction to it. If The Sexual Life of Catherine M seemed to disregard emotion, Jealousy is its radical complement: the paradoxical confession of a libertine, who succumbs to the 'timeless and universal malady'.
Main Description
After the pleasure comes the pain. The Sexual Life of Catherine M, Catherine Millet’s analysis of the many forms and flavours of sexual pleasure, was internationally admired, and not just for its literary qualities. The audacity of a sex life well lived and thoroughly examined left readers wondering how she managed to pull it off while sustaining her relationship with life partner, writer Jacques Henric. ‘I had love at home’ she explained. ‘I sought only pleasure in the world outside’.Then one day she discovered a letter lying about the apartment, from which it became clear that Jacques was involved elsewhere. Jealousy details the crisis provoked by this discovery and her reaction to it. If The Sexual Life of Catherine M seemed to disregard emotion, Jealousy is its radical complement: the paradoxical confession of a libertine, who succumbs to the 'timeless and universal malady'.

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