Catalogue


Literature, language, and the rise of the intellectual disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820 /
Robin Valenza.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
ix, 239 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521767024 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780521767026 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
0521767024 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780521767026 (hardback : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7037613
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Review of the hardback: 'Her lively, lucid explorations of Newtonian science, Scottish philosophy and Romantic poetics offer some provocative new perspectives on the organisation of knowledge in the long eighteenth century; they also invite her academic readers to temper the scepticism of the specialist with the more conversible qualities of intellectual agility and lightly worn eclecticism.' Review of English Studies
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a literary account of how the modern divide between the sciences and the humanities emerged in the 18th century. Valenza shows how Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, David Hume, and many others, invented new intellectual languages.
Main Description
The current divide between the sciences and the humanities, which often seem to speak entirely different languages, has its roots in the way intellectual disciplines developed in the long eighteenth century. As various fields of study became defined and to some degree professionalized, their ways of communicating evolved into an increasingly specialist vocabulary. Chemists, physicists, philosophers, and poets argued about whether their discourses should become more and more specialized, or whether they should aim to remain intelligible to the layperson. In this interdisciplinary study, Robin Valenza shows how Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth invented new intellectual languages. By offering a much-needed new account of the rise of the modern disciplines, Robin Valenza shows why the sciences and humanities diverged so strongly, and argues that literature has a special role in navigating between the languages of different areas of thought.
Main Description
The divide between the sciences and the humanities, which often seem to speak entirely different languages, has its roots in the way intellectual disciplines developed in the long eighteenth century. As various fields of study became defined and to some degree professionalized, their ways of communicating evolved into an increasingly specialist vocabulary. Chemists, physicists, philosophers, and poets argued about whether their discourses should become more and more specialised, or whether they should aim to remain intelligible to the layperson. In this interdisciplinary 2009 study, Robin Valenza shows how Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth invented new intellectual languages. By offering a much-needed account of the rise of the modern disciplines, Robin Valenza shows why the sciences and humanities diverged so strongly, and argues that literature has a special role in navigating between the languages of different areas of thought.
Description for Bookstore
By offering a much-needed account of the rise of the modern disciplines, in this 2009 study Robin Valenza shows why the sciences and humanities diverged so strongly, and argues that literature has a special role in navigating between the languages of different areas of thought. He focuses on eighteenth-century physics, philosophy, and poetry.
Description for Bookstore
A history of intellectual disciplines in Britain, focusing on the development of physics, philosophy, and poetry from the late seventeenth century to the early nineteenth century.
Table of Contents
The economies of knowledge
The learned and conversible worlds
Physics and its audiences
Philosophy's place between science and literature
Poetry among the intellectual disciplines
Coda: common sense and common language
Works cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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