Catalogue


How societies embrace information technology : lessons for management and the rest of us /
James W. Cortada.
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons ; Los Alamitos, Calif. : IEEE Computer Society, c2009
description
xiii, 273 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0470534982, 9780470534984
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons ; Los Alamitos, Calif. : IEEE Computer Society, c2009
isbn
0470534982
9780470534984
catalogue key
7029261
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James W. Cortada has Thirty-five years of experience with IBM in various sales, consulting, and managerial positions related to information technology and its use. In particular, he helped design and deploy processes related to employee skills development, including IBM's worldwide consultant skills certification process, sales processes, and specialized training seminars. An author of more than fifty books on the management and history of information technology, Cortada's work has been translated into Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, and Korean.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-07-01:
As the preface explains, this volume is essentially a collection of essays on the role of information technology (IT) in modern societies, rather than a rigorous academic monograph. Cortada, a historian and a prolific author, brings 35 years' experience with IBM to bear on the subject. Chapters treat topics such as the rapid spread of computers around the world; the use of IT by governments to improve their economies; how managers and officials decide what IT to use; expanding and new roles for scientists and engineers; and the evolution of IT as the 21st century progresses. The book's subtitle indicates that Cortada is fundamentally interested in how his insights relate to management now and in the future. In a section titled "The Ultimate Trend," he notes that collaborative behavior (rather than just adversarial action) has been increasing thanks to IT, and that IT itself makes collaboration more possible now than at any time in history. He advises that managers and public officials need to understand the dynamics of these modern forms of collaboration because they will become the defining new managerial practices. The concluding bibliographic essay will be useful to readers wishing to pursue this topic further. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers; all levels of students; researchers and professionals. E. J. Szewczak Canisius College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The book also presents ideas for educators. For instance, to encourage IT people to be naturally proactive, courses should leverage the creation and production of IT projects with solving society's problems. With some effort, this can be done in computers and society courses, at both the general and professional education level. At the professional level, IT workers with such experience and training will more likely choose to work on problem areas. At the general level, people with such experience will act politically, to vocalize the expectation that the IT industry will create products that help society." (Computing Reviews, September 2010)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
A truly global look at IT deployment and use No technology in our history has spread as fast as computers and their digital technologies. In How Societies Embrace Information Technology , leading IT authority James Cortada examines how this phenomenon is shaping contemporary society, focusing on the role of corporations and governments. By revealing what history teaches about the adoption of information technologies, Cortada prepares business and government leaders to spot new trends and successfully develop strategies for implementing and managing emerging technologies. Coverage includes: Summaries of the new best practices based on sixty years of historical experience, all research-based How technology spread so quickly and completely across the globe A look at the decision-making process of managers in the private and public sectors How governments leverage IT to improve their national economies An examination of the "Information Age" and whether it actually exists The most current developments in IT This authoritative reference is ideal for government policymakers and for private-sector managers who routinely make decisions to acquire and use information technology. It is also aimed at academics concerned with the sociology, history, economics, and the effects of IT on contemporary society, as well as business schools and engineering and IT professionals serving in management roles or interested in the managerial/user history of IT. The author's royalties on sales of this book will be donated to the IEEE Computer Society's Educational Activities Board.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text discusses how computers are shaping contemporary society, with a tight focus on the role of corporations and governments. It is aimed at government policymakers interested in economic development and at private-sector managers who routinely make decisions to acquire and use information technology.
Long Description
A truly global look at IT deployment and useNo technology in our history has spread as fast as computers and their digital technologies. In How Societies Embrace Information Technology, leading IT authority James Cortada examines how this phenomenon is shaping contemporary society, focusing on the role of corporations and governments. By revealing what history teaches about the adoption of information technologies, Cortada prepares business and government leaders to spot new trends and successfully develop strategies for implementing and managing emerging technologies. Coverage includes:Summaries of the new best practices based on sixty years of historical experience, all research-basedHow technology spread so quickly and completely across the globeA look at the decision-making process of managers in the private and public sectorsHow governments leverage IT to improve their national economiesAn examination of the "Information Age" and whether it actually existsThe most current developments in ITThis authoritative reference is ideal for government policymakers and for private-sector managers who routinely make decisions to acquire and use information technology. It is also aimed at academics concerned with the sociology, history, economics, and the effects of IT on contemporary society, as well as business schools and engineering and IT professionals serving in management roles or interested in the managerial/user history of IT.The author's royalties on sales of this book will be donated to the IEEE Computer Society's Educational Activities Board.
Long Description
How Societies Embrace Information TechnologyLessons for Management and the Rest of UsJames W. CortadaA truly global look at IT deployment and useNo technology in our history has spread as fast as computers and their digital technologies. In How Societies Embrace Information Technology, leading IT authority James Cortada examines how this phenomenon is shaping contemporary society, focusing on the role of corporations and governments. By revealing what history teaches about the adoption of information technologies, Cortada prepares business and government leaders to spot new trends and successfully develop strategies for implementing and managing emerging technologies. Coverage includes:Summaries of the new best practices based on sixty years of historical experience, all research-basedHow technology spread so quickly and completely across the globeA look at the decision-making process of managers in the private and public sectorsHow governments leverage IT to improve their national economiesAn examination of the "Information Age" and whether it actually existsThe most current developments in ITThis authoritative reference is ideal for government policymakers and for private-sector managers who routinely make decisions to acquire and use information technology. It is also aimed at academics concerned with the sociology, history, economics, and the effects of IT on contemporary society, as well as business schools and engineering and IT professionals serving in management roles or interested in the managerial/user history of IT.The author's royalties on sales of this book will be donated to the IEEE Computer Society's Educational Activities Board.
Main Description
This book discusses how computers are shaping contemporary society, with a tight focus on the role of corporations and governments. It is aimed at government policymakers interested in economic development and at private-sector managers who routinely make decisions to acquire and use information technology, now a worldwide expenditure of over $2 trillion annually. The book will also interest a wide range of academics concerned with the sociology, history, economics, and the effects of IT on contemporary society, ands to the general trade market.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introducing the Big Picturep. 1
The presence of information technologyp. 2
Megatrends at workp. 7
How societies use technology to shape their worldp. 19
Notes and referencesp. 24
How Computers Spread Around the World So Fastp. 27
Definitions and issuesp. 29
Government-supported/private-sector-driven modelp. 33
National champion modelp. 37
Asian private-sector-driven modelp. 39
Planned economy: public policy modelp. 42
Industry-driven modelp. 48
Corporate diffusion modelp. 51
Application diffusion modelp. 57
Technology-standards diffusion modelp. 59
Patterns, Practices, and implicationsp. 61
Notes and referencesp. 65
How Governments Leverage Information Technologies to Improve Their National Economiesp. 71
A brief historical reminderp. 72
Economic development in a connected world: the big picturep. 75
How governments use it to encourage economic developmentp. 77
What motivates governments to encourage their citizens and economics to use it?p. 91
Emerging strategies for the most advanced nations compared to repidly advancing nationsp. 96
The special role of laborp. 100
Global recession, twenty-first century stylep. 102
Implications for public officialsp. 106
Implications for business leadersp. 112
The way forward with policies and practicesp. 116
Notes and referencesp. 122
How Managers and Officials Decide What Technology to Usep. 129
The kinds of decisions made by managersp. 131
Types of justificationsp. 135
Managerial practicesp. 138
Some possible less effective practicesp. 143
Special role of industriesp. 149
Path forwardp. 151
Notes and referencesp. 157
Adding Up the Results So Far: Do We Now Live in the Information Age?p. 163
Why naming an age is a useful exercise and so hard to dop. 165
What historians can teach us about the processp. 167
The case against the information agep. 173
Can we coexist on the frontiers of a new age?p. 175
Lessons for management and a strategy for changep. 179
Concluding thoughtsp. 185
Notes and referencesp. 186
An Expanding Role for Scientists and Engineersp. 191
The rise of the computer scientistp. 192
Their future worldp. 212
An old role made newp. 218
Notes and referencesp. 220
Looking Down the Road into the Twenty-First Centuryp. 223
How to see the future of an industryp. 225
Knowing how information technology is evoluvingp. 233
A strategy for managers and public officialsp. 240
Special role of the computer science communityp. 247
The ultimate trendp. 252
Notes and referencesp. 254
Keeping Up: Bibliography Essayp. 257
The big picturep. 257
How computers spread around the worldp. 259
Governments leveraging it for economic developmentp. 260
Deciding what technology to usep. 261
Living in the information agep. 263
Role of technologistsp. 264
Into the twenty-first centuryp. 265
Indexp. 267
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem