Catalogue


1969 : the year everything changed /
Rob Kirkpatrick.
imprint
New York, NY : Skyhorse Pub., c2009.
description
xvii, 302 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1602393664 (hbk.alk. paper), 9781602393660 (hbk. alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, NY : Skyhorse Pub., c2009.
isbn
1602393664 (hbk.alk. paper)
9781602393660 (hbk. alk. paper)
contents note
Revolution, apocalypse, and the birth of modern America -- Winter's children. Nixon's coming ; Something in the air ; The new sounds ; Super jets ; The American family -- Revolution in springtime. America undressed ; A whole new ball game ; Poison ivy ; 1, 2, 3, what are we fighting for? ; The green mind ; Stand! -- The summer of impossible dreams. Walking in space ; The mists of Camelot ; Shaking the cage ; West Coast killers ; An amazin' summer ; Heaven in a disaster area -- Autumn apocalypse. "There are no words" ; Nixon's war ; Days of rage ; Cowboys and Indians ; The hippie apocalypse -- Future shock: the '70s and beyond.
catalogue key
7024670
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [273]-296).
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
Chronicling the year 1969, this book is an eminently readable account of US society at the time. Kirkpatrick first acknowledges the glut of books about 1968, and then wonders about the dearth of studies on the year that followed, considering its historical significance. In all manner of ways, 1969 was like the other side of a turning point, when changes truly started to manifest. Richard Nixon helped usher in the decline of liberalism with his Silent Majority speech. He also expanded the war in Vietnam, despite the lesson many took from the Tet Offensive that the war was already lost. Meanwhile, the New Left gave birth to the Weathermen, which rejected nonviolence for bombings that would "bring the war home." The ideas of Black Power spread in the face of an FBI effort to destroy its various forms. And music evolved, drawing on so much of "what was in the air" with the first heavy metal and punk sounds. Kirkpatrick traces these and many other changes in a clear, engaging style and interweaves excerpts from primary sources. Summing Up: Recommended. General, undergraduate, and public libraries. C. Montrie University of Massachusetts Lowell
Appeared in Library Journal on 2009-02-01:
In this compelling and freewheeling account, Kirkpatrick (The Words and Music of Bruce Springsteen) treats the tumultuous events of 1969 with the skills of a journalist, a historian, a sociologist, and a sportswriter and manages to insert moments of lightness and triviality into his grand tour. He writes as easily about jazz-pop as about the rise of the American Indian Movement. He follows a harrowing chapter about the Manson family and the Zodiac Killer with a breathless report on the Amazin' Mets. Later, he describes the surreal convergence of Game 4 of the World Series with the National Moratorium Day against the Vietnam War. In Kirkpatrick's account, Joe Namath receives more attention than Spiro Agnew. This is not a definitive, scholarly study of the year's events, but it serves well as a primer on the condition of American life at the end of the 1960s. In addition to over 500 endnotes, Kirkpatrick provides a handy time line of the year's significant events. Nostalgic for some, revelatory for others, this is a worthy addition to the literature of the 1960s.-Thomas A. Karel, Franklin & Marshall Coll. Lib., Lancaster, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Lamenting all the attention 1968 has gotten with assassinations and riots, Kirkpatrick argues that the following year was more than a little significant, too. Beginning with a 'œselected timeline,' Kirkpatrick goes on to chronicle a dizzying array of major events: Richard Nixon's election in November 1968 as president; the covert bombing of Cambodia; Apollo 11 landing on the moon; student antiwar protests from Harvard to Berkeley; disclosure of the My Lai massacre; the sexual revolution manifested on stage, in literature and movies, and at outdoor festivals; startling innovations in the music world; the 'œdays of rage' protest kicked off during the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago; the first message sent via the ARPANET, precursor of the Internet. Kirkpatrick asserts that 1969 was the birth of modern America and sets out to relate how this incredible year reflected deep underlying changes in American culture. The book is divided into four parts that roughly outline the year, including 'œsexual revolutions of springtime' and 'œthe apocalyptic standoffs at year's end.' A riveting look at a pivotal year.
"The subtitle of his new book, 1969: The Year Everything Changed, may sound hyperbolic, but Kirkpatrick makes a good case that it was a year of 'landmark achievements, cataclysmic episodes and generation-defining events.'"
A compelling account of the historic year.
In this compelling and freewheeling account, Kirkpatrick treats the tumultuous events of 1969 with the skills of a journalist, a historian, a sociologist, and a sportswriter and manages to insert moments of lightness and triviality into his grand tour. . . . . A worthy addition to the literature of the 1960s.
Kalb asks the kind of common-sense questions you think of from time to time that never get much of an airing The thing I like about Elliott is that we disagree more than we agree on the sports scene, but I learn something from him every time we talk. Good reason to check his book out.
Kalb asks the kind of common-sense questions you think of from time to time that never get much of an airing'¦The thing I like about Elliott is that we disagree more than we agree on the sports scene, but I learn something from him every time we talk. Good reason to check his book out.
Kalb asks the kind of common-sense questions you think of from time to time that never get much of an airing…The thing I like about Elliott is that we disagree more than we agree on the sports scene, but I learn something from him every time we talk. Good reason to check his book out.
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, January 2009
USA Today, January 2009
Library Journal, February 2009
Choice, February 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
For the fortieth anniversary of 1969, Rob Kirkpatrick takes a look back at a year when America witnessed many of the biggest landmark achievements, cataclysmic episodes, and generation-defining events in recent history. 1969 was the year that saw Apollo 11 land on the moon, the Cinderella stories of Joe Namath s Jets and the Miracle Mets, the Harvard student strike and armed standoff at Cornell, the People s Park riots, the first artificial heart transplant and first computer network connection, the Manson family murders and cryptic Zodiac Killer letters, the Woodstock music festival, Easy Rider, Kurt Vonnegut s Slaughterhouse-Five, the Battle of Hamburger Hill, the birth of punk music, the invasion of Led Zeppelin, the occupation of Alcatraz, death at Altamont Speedway, and much more. It was a year that pushed boundaries on stage (Oh! Calcutta!), screen (Midnight Cowboy), and the printed page (Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex), witnessed the genesis of the gay rights movement at Stonewall, and started the era of the no fault divorce. Richard Nixon became president, the New Left squared off against the Silent Majority, William Ayers co-founded the Weatherman Organization, and the nationwide Moratorium provided a unifying force in the peace movement. Compelling, timely, and quite simply a blast to read, 1969 chronicles the year through all its ups and downs, in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology. This is a book for those who survived 1969, or for those who simply want to feel as alive as those who lived through this time of amazing upheaval.
Main Description
For the fortieth anniversary of 1969, Rob Kirkpatrick takes a look back at a year when America witnessed many of the biggest landmark achievements, cataclysmic episodes, and generation-defining events in recent history. 1969 was the year that saw Apollo 11 land on the moon, the Cinderella stories of Joe Namath's Jets and the Miracle Mets, the Harvard student strike and armed standoff at Cornell, the People's Park riots, the first artificial heart transplant and first computer network connection, the Manson family murders and cryptic Zodiac Killer letters, the Woodstock music festival, Easy Rider, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five, the Battle of Hamburger Hill, the birth of punk music, the invasion of Led Zeppelin, the occupation of Alcatraz, death at Altamont Speedway, and much more. It was a year that pushed boundaries on stage (Oh! Calcutta!), screen (Midnight Cowboy), and the printed page (Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex), witnessed the genesis of the gay rights movement at Stonewall, and started the era of the no fault divorce. Richard Nixon became president, the New Left squared off against the Silent Majority, William Ayers co-founded the Weatherman Organization, and the nationwide Moratorium provided a unifying force in the peace movement. Compelling, timely, and quite simply a blast to read, 1969 chronicles the year through all its ups and downs, in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology. This is a book for those who survived 1969, or for those who simply want to feel as alive as those who lived through this time of amazing upheaval.
Main Description
For the fortieth anniversary of 1969, Rob Kirkpatrick takes a look back at a year when America witnessed many of the biggest landmark achievements, cataclysmic episodes, and generation-defining events in recent history.1969 was the year that saw Apollo 11 land on the moon, the Cinderella stories of Joe Namath's Jets and the 'œMiracle Mets,' the Harvard student strike and armed standoff at Cornell, the People's Park riots, the first artificial heart transplant and first computer network connection, the Manson family murders and cryptic Zodiac Killer letters, the Woodstock music festival, Easy Rider , Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five , the Battle of Hamburger Hill, the birth of punk music, the invasion of Led Zeppelin, the occupation of Alcatraz, death at Altamont Speedway, and much more. It was a year that pushed boundaries on stage ( Oh! Calcutta! ), screen ( Midnight Cowboy ), and the printed page ( Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex ), witnessed the genesis of the gay rights movement at Stonewall, and started the era of the 'œno fault' divorce. Richard Nixon became president, the New Left squared off against the Silent Majority, William Ayers co-founded the Weatherman Organization, and the nationwide Moratorium provided a unifying force in the peace movement.Compelling, timely, and quite simply a blast to read, 1969 chronicles the year through all its ups and downs, in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology. This is a book for those who survived 1969, or for those who simply want to feel as alive as those who lived through this time of amazing upheaval.
Main Description
For the fortieth anniversary of 1969, Rob Kirkpatrick takes a look back at a year when America witnessed many of the biggest landmark achievements, cataclysmic episodes, and generation-defining events in recent history. 1969 was the year that saw Apollo 11 land on the moon, the Cinderella stories of Joe Namath "s Jets and the SMiracle Mets, the Harvard student strike and armed standoff at Cornell, the People "s Park riots, the first artificial heart transplant and first computer network connection, the Manson family murders and cryptic Zodiac Killer letters, the Woodstock music festival, Easy Rider, Kurt Vonnegut "s Slaughterhouse-Five, the Battle of Hamburger Hill, the birth of punk music, the invasion of Led Zeppelin, the occupation of Alcatraz, death at Altamont Speedway, and much more. It was a year that pushed boundaries on stage (Oh! Calcutta!), screen (Midnight Cowboy), and the printed page (Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex), witnessed the genesis of the gay rights movement at Stonewall, and started the era of the Sno fault divorce. Richard Nixon became president, the New Left squared off against the Silent Majority, William Ayers co-founded the Weatherman Organization, and the nationwide Moratorium provided a unifying force in the peace movement. Compelling, timely, and quite simply a blast to read, 1969 chronicles the year through all its ups and downs, in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology. This is a book for those who survived 1969, or for those who simply want to feel as alive as those who lived through this time of amazing upheaval.
Main Description
In 1969, man landed on the moon; the "Miracle Mets" captivated sports fans;students took over college campuses and demonstrators battled police; Americawitnessed the Woodstock music festival; Hollywood produced Easy Rider; KurtVonnegut published Slaughterhouse-Five; punk music was born; and there wasmurder at Altamont Speedway. Compelling, timely, and a blast to read, 1969chronicles the year in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology.This rich, comprehensive history is perfect for those who survived 1969or for those who simply want to feel as though they did.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. v
Selected Timelinep. viii
Prologue: Revolution, Apocalypse, and the Birth of Modern Americap. xv
Winter's Childrenp. 1
Nixon's Comingp. 2
Something in the Airp. 9
The New Soundsp. 19
Super Jetsp. 31
The American Familyp. 38
Revolution in Springtimep. 51
America Undressedp. 52
A Whole New Ball Gamep. 69
Poison Ivyp. 78
1, 2, 3, What Are We Fighting For?p. 90
The Green Mindp. 96
Stand!p. 105
The Summer of Impossible Dreamsp. 113
Walking in Spacep. 114
The Mists of Camelotp. 130
Shaking the Cagep. 139
West Coast Killersp. 149
An Amazin' Summerp. 163
Heaven in a Disaster Areap. 171
Autumn Apocalypsep. 195
"There Are No Words"p. 196
Nixon's Warp. 205
Days of Ragep. 216
Cowboys and Indiansp. 231
The Hippie Apocalypsep. 248
Epilogue: Future Shock-The Seventies and Beyondp. 266
Bibliographyp. 273
Endnotesp. 285
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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