Catalogue


Court officials of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom /
Wolfram Grajetzki ; drawings by Paul Whelan.
imprint
London : Duckworth, 2009.
description
xvi, 215 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0715637452, 9780715637456
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
London : Duckworth, 2009.
isbn
0715637452
9780715637456
catalogue key
7023677
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Wolfram Grajetzki is the author of Burial Customs in Ancient Egypt (2003) and The Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt (2006). Paul Whelan is the author and illustrator of Mere Scraps of Rough Wood? 17th-18th Dynasty Stick Shabtis in the Petrie Museum and Other Collections (2007).
Summaries
Main Description
Building on the latest research, Wolfram Grajetzki here looks in detail at the circle of officials around the king in the Middle Kingdom of ancient Egypt. Describing the history of the principal offices of state, he takes into account inscriptions, monuments and the few preserved tombs, and traces the careers of some individual officials. The holders of these offices were the men chosen by the king to be his close advisers. They received strings of important titles, and their monuments are among the finest works of art and architecture of the time. Over all the other officials and second only to the king stood the tjaty, or vizier, while alongside him and of only slightly lower status, the treasurer was in charge of the resources of the country. From the evidence for these men, a new, more precise image emerges of ancient Egyptian civilization in its monumental accomplishments and its daily operations. The text is copiously illustrated with drawings by Paul Whelan.
Main Description
Building on the latest research, Wolfram Grajetzki here looks in detail at the circle of officials that surrounded the king in the Middle Kingdom of ancient Egypt (Eleventh to Thirteenth Dynasty, also including the Second Intermediate Period; c. 2040-1550 BC). Describing the history of the principal offices of state, he takes into account inscriptions, monuments and the few preserved tombs, and traces the careers of some individual officials. The holders of these offices were the men chosen by the king to be his close advisers. They received strings of important titles, and their monuments are among the finest works of art and architecture of the time. Over all the other officials and second only to the king stood the 'tjaty', or vizier, while alongside him and of only slightly lower status, the treasurer was in charge of the resources of the country. From the evidence for these men, a new, more precise image emerges of ancient Egyptian civilization in its monumental accomplishments and its daily operations. "Court Officials of the Middle Kingdom" is essential reading for all scholars and students of the period. The text is copiously illustrated with drawings by Paul Whelan.
Main Description
Building on the latest research, Wolfram Grajetzki looks in detail at the circle of officials that surrounded the king in the Middle Kingdom of ancient Egypt (Eleventh to Fourteenth Dynasty, c. 2040-1640 BC). Describing the history of the principal offices of state, he takes into account inscriptions, monuments and the few preserved tombs, and traces the careers of some individual officials. The holders of these offices were the men chosen by the king to be his close advisers. They received strings of important titles, and their monuments are among the finest works of art and architecture of the time. Over all the other officials and second only to the king stood the tjaty, or vizier, while alongside him and of only slightly lower status, the treasurer was in charge of the resources of the country. From the evidence for these men, a new, more precise image emerges of ancient Egyptian civilization in its monumental accomplishments and its daily operations. Court Officials of the Middle Kingdom is essential reading for all scholars and students of the period. The text is copiously illustrated with drawings by Paul Whelan.
Main Description
Building on the latest research, Wolfram Grajetzki here looks in detail at the circle of officials that surrounded the king in the Middle Kingdom of ancient Egypt (Eleventh to Thirteenth Dynasty, also including the Second Intermediate Period; c. 2040-1550 BC). Describing the history of the principal offices of state, he takes into account inscriptions, monuments and the few preserved tombs, and traces the careers of some individual officials. The holders of these offices were the men chosen by the king to be his close advisers. They received strings of important titles, and their monuments are among the finest works of art and architecture of the time. Over all the other officials and second only to the king stood the tjaty, or vizier, while alongside him and of only slightly lower status, the treasurer was in charge of the resources of the country. From the evidence for these men, a new, more precise image emerges of ancient Egyptian civilization in its monumental accomplishments and its daily operations. "Court Officials of the Middle Kingdom" is essential reading for all scholars and students of the period. The text is copiously illustrated with drawings by Paul Whelan.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Chronologyp. ix
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Historical Backgroundp. 1
The Vizier, æPrime MinisterÆ of Egyptp. 15
The æTreasurerÆ or æChancellorÆp. 43
Other Important Officialsp. 67
Military Officialsp. 101
Provincial Officialsp. 109
Procedures, Relations, Social Mobility and Careersp. 123
The Lives of Court Officialsp. 145
Women Related to Court Officialsp. 157
Appendix List of Officialsp. 169
Notesp. 179
Further Readingp. 199
Bibliography and Abbreviationsp. 201
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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