Catalogue


Renaissance transformations : the making of English writing (1500-1650) /
edited by Margaret Healy and Thomas Healy.
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2009.
description
vi, 217 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0748638733 (hbk.), 9780748638734 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2009.
isbn
0748638733 (hbk.)
9780748638734 (hbk.)
general note
Formerly CIP.
catalogue key
7022896
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Margaret Healy is Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Sussex. She is the author of Fictions of Disease in Early Modern England: Bodies, Plagues and Politics and is currently completing Shakespeare's Sonnets and 'A Lovers Complaint', Alchemy and the Creative Imagination. Thomas Healy is Professor of Renaissance Studies and Head of the School of English at the University of Sussex. He is the author of books on Crashaw, Marlowe, and on Theory and Renaissance Literature. He is completing The English Boat: The Poetics of Sectarianism in Early Modern England.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-09-01:
This collection posits an unfinished Renaissance, a period and outlook always under construction or reexamination. Present participles dot these essays as authors of the period are seen to be continually "negotiating," "speaking," "framing," "tuning," "fashioning," or "collaborating on" their literary creations so that the early modern era is drawn closer to the present in its fluidity, open-endedness, and habits of self-aware revision. The dozen contributions address a wide range of texts and genres and also the social contexts that fostered them, including friendships, literary competition, voyages and explorations, and the gendered appropriation of genres and forms. The editors group the essays in three sections: "Making Writing: Form, Rhetoric, and Print Culture," "Shaping Communities: Textual Spaces: Mapping History," and, perhaps the most interesting, "Embodying Change: Psychic and Somatic Performances." Particularly noteworthy in the last are Michael Schoenfeldt on how metaphysical poetry seeks to re-create the bodily sensations it describes and Susan Wiseman on the meanings of curious animal rituals in popular culture of the period. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. C. Baker Armstrong Atlantic State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Present participles dot these essays as authors of the period are seen to be continually "negotiating" or "collaborating on" their library creations so that the early modern era is drawn closer to the present in its' fluidity, open-endedness, and habits of self-aware revision.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Renaissance Transformations: The Making of English Writing 1500-1650 Edited by Margaret Healy and Thomas HealyRenaissance Transformations: The Making of English Writing 1500-1650 asserts the centrality of historical understanding in shaping critical vision. This collection of distinctive new essays explores the dynamic cultural, intellectual and social processes that moulded literary writing in the Renaissance. Acutely attentive to the complexities that we confront in our attempts to understand the past, this book explores important relations among literary form, material and imaginative culture which compel our attention in the twenty-first century. Addressing three crucial areas at the forefront of current academic inquiry - 'Making Writing: Form, Rhetoric and Print Culture', 'Shaping Communities: Textual Spaces, Mapping History' and 'Embodying Change: Psychic and Somatic Performances' - this innovative, timely volume is of fundamental importance to all those who study and teach Renaissance literature, history and culture. Contributors are Danielle Clarke, Andrew Hadfield, Margaret Healy, Thomas Healy, Bernhard Klein, Michelle O'Callaghan, Neil Rhodes, Jennifer Richards Michael Schoenfeldt, William Sherman, Alan Stewart, and Susan Wiseman.Margaret Healy is Director of the Centre for Early Modern Studies at the University of Sussex. She is the author of Fictions of Disease in Early Modern England: Bodies, Plagues and Politics and is currently completing Shakespeare's Sonnets and 'A Lovers Complaint', Alchemy and the Creative Imagination. Thomas Healy is Professor of Renaissance Studies and Head of the School of English at the University of Sussex. He is the author of books on Crashaw, Marlowe, and on Theory and Renaissance Literature. He is completing The English Boat: The Poetics of Sectarianism in Early Modern England.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A collection of distinctive new essays, this text explores the dynamic cultural, intellectual and social processes that shaped literary writing in the Renaissance.
Description for Reader
Renaissance Transformations is a collection of distinctive new essays exploring the dynamic cultural, intellectual, and social processes that shaped literary writing and its world between 1500 and 1650.Acutely attentive to the complexities that we confront in our attempts to understand the past, twelve leading scholars of Renaissance Studies engage with the debates surrounding the interfaces among texts and material culture, ideas and literary form which demand attention at the start of the twenty-first century. Divided into three parts: Making Writing, Shaping Communities, and Embodying Change the volume demonstrates how Renaissance writing was 'made', incorporating matters of authorship, originality, circulation and what a 'text' was conceived to be. Drawing on ideas about process and provisionality the world this writing helped shape is shown to be protean rather than fixed.This timely and questioning volume is of importance to all those who study and teach Renaissance literature, history, and culture.
Description for Reader
Renaissance Transformations: The Making of English Writing 1500-1650 asserts the centrality of historical understanding in shaping critical vision. This collection of distinctive new essays explores the dynamic cultural, intellectual and social processes that moulded literary writing in the Renaissance. Acutely attentive to the complexities that we confront in our attempts to understand the past, this book explores important relations among literary form, material and imaginative culture which compel our attention in the twenty-first century. Addressing three crucial areas at the forefront of current academic inquiry - 'Making Writing: Form, Rhetoric and Print Culture', 'Shaping Communities: Textual Spaces, Mapping History' and 'Embodying Change: Psychic and Somatic Performances' - this innovative, timely volume is of fundamental importance to all those who study and teach Renaissance literature, history and culture. Contributors are Danielle Clarke, Andrew Hadfield, Margaret Healy, Thomas Healy, Bernhard Klein, Michelle O'Callaghan, Neil Rhodes, Jennifer Richards Michael Schoenfeldt, William Sherman, Alan Stewart, and Susan Wiseman .
Description for Teachers/Educators
Renaissance Studies, Renaissance Literature, Renaissance Culture. English literature; early modern literature; early modern culture; Sixteenth-century literature; Seventeenth-century literature.There are MA courses in Renaissance Studies at:Birkbeck College, University of LondonUniversity of BirminghamUniversity of CambridgeEdinburgh UniversityUniversity of LeedsUniversity of LiverpoolUniversity of OxfordQueen Mary College, University of LondonQueens University BelfastUniversity of StirlingUniversity of StrathclydeUniversity College LondonUniversity of WarwickUniversity of York
Description for Teachers/Educators
Renaissance Studies, Renaissance Literature, Renaissance CultureThere are MA courses in Renaissance Studies at:Birkbeck College, University of LondonUniversity of BirminghamUniversity of CambridgeEdinburgh UniversityUniversity of LeedsUniversity of LiverpoolUniversity of OxfordQueen Mary College, University of LondonQueens University BelfastUniversity of StirlingUniversity of StrathclydeUniversity College LondonUniversity of WarwickUniversity of York
Main Description
Renaissance Transformations is a collection of distinctive new essays exploring the dynamic cultural, intellectual, and social processes that shaped literary writing and its world between 1500 and 1650. Acutely attentive to the complexities that we confront in our attempts to understand the past, twelve leading scholars of Renaissance Studies engage with the debates surrounding the interfaces among texts and material culture, ideas and literary form which demand attention at the start of the twenty-first century. Divided into three parts: Making Writing, Shaping Communities, and Embodying Change the volume demonstrates how Renaissance writing was 'made', incorporating matters of authorship, originality, circulation and what a 'text' was conceived to be. Drawing on ideas about process and provisionality the world this writing helped shape is shown to be protean rather than fixed.This timely and questioning volume is of importance to all those who study and teach Renaissance literature, history, and culture.
Main Description
Renaissance Transformations is a distinctive collection original essays exploring the dynamic cultural, intellectual, and social processes that shaped literary writing and its world between 1500 and 1650. Acutely attentive to the complexities of confronting the past, twelve leading scholars of the Renaissance engage with the interactions among texts, material culture, ideas, and literary form. Divided into three parts: making writing, shaping communities, and embodying change, the volume demonstrates the "making" of Renaissance writing, incorporating matters of authorship, originality, circulation, and the conception of a "text." Drawing on ideas about process and provisionality, the world of the Renaissance is shown to be protean rather than fixed.
Main Description
Renaissance Transformations: The Making of English Writing 1500-1650 asserts the centrality of historical understanding in shaping critical vision. This collection of distinctive new essays explores the dynamic cultural, intellectual and social processes that moulded literary writing in the Renaissance. Acutely attentive to the complexities that we confront in our attempts to understand the past, this book explores important relations among literary form, material and imaginative culture which compel our attention in the twenty-first century. Addressing three crucial areas at the forefront of current academic inquiry - 'Making Writing: Form, Rhetoric and Print Culture', 'Shaping Communities: Textual Spaces, Mapping History' and 'Embodying Change: Psychic and Somatic Performances' - this innovative, timely volume is of fundamental importance to all those who study and teach Renaissance literature, history and culture. Contributors are Danielle Clarke, Andrew Hadfield, Margaret Healy, Thomas Healy, Bernhard Klein, Michelle O'Callaghan, Neil Rhodes, Jennifer Richards Michael Schoenfeldt, William Sherman, Alan Stewart, and Susan Wiseman.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Making Writing: Form, Rhetoric and Print Culture
Playing Seriously in Renaissance Writingp. 15
Framing and Tuning in Renaissance English Versep. 32
Transforming A Mirror for Magistratesp. 48
'Not without Mustard': Self-publicity and Polemic in Early Modern Literary Londonp. 64
Shaping Communities: Textual Spaces, Mapping History
The Making of Writing in Renaissance England: Re-thinking Authorship Through Collaborationp. 81
The Duties of Societies: Literature, Friendship and Communityp. 97
Gender, Material Culture and the Hybridity of Renaissance Writingp. 112
The Overseas Voyage in Early Modern English Writingp. 128
Embodying Change: Psychic and Somatic Performances
Eloquent Blood and Deliberative Bodies: The Physiology of Metaphysical Poetryp. 145
Protean Bodies: Literature, Alchemy, Science and English Revolutionsp. 161
Shakespearean Somniloquy: Sleep and Transformation in The Tempestp. 177
'A Cat On A Post': Animal Events in Seventeenth-century Writingp. 192
Notes on Contributorsp. 208
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem