Catalogue


Of hockey and hijab : reflections of a Canadian Muslim woman /
Sheema Khan.
imprint
Toronto : TSAR Books, 2009.
description
161 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
1894770560 (Paper), 9781894770569 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
author
imprint
Toronto : TSAR Books, 2009.
isbn
1894770560 (Paper)
9781894770569 (Paper)
catalogue key
7022004
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"I will never see my own country quite the same again. I thank Sheema Khan for lending me her eyes and giving all Canadians the precious and welcome gift of her words. Her insight into everything from religion to hockey--often thought to be the same thing in this country!--is blessed with intelligence and humour."--Roy MacGregor, author of Canadians: A Portrait of a Country and Its People"From women's issues to terrorism to Islamophobia, Of Hockey and Hijab takes the reader on a journey to explore many contemporary issues affecting Muslims in Canada and abroad. Khan's book is a must read for all."--Monia Mazigh, author of Hope and Despair"Sheema Khan reflects on issues ranging from discrimination from others to religious patriarchy from within, faced by her Muslim coreligionists in Canada and abroad. She does so with empathy, wisdom, and humour, concluding that reasonable accommodation on the part of non-Muslims and a proper reading of the Koran and understanding of the teachings of the prophet Muhammad would lead to an Islam that would be perfectly compatible with Canada #146;s unique multicultural experiment."--Michael Adams, President, Environics Institute
' will never see my own country quite the same again. I thank Sheema Khan for lending me her eyes and giving all Canadians the precious and welcome gift of her words. Her insight into everything from religion to hockey'ften thought to be the same thing in this country!?s blessed with intelligence and humour.'?oy MacGregor, author of Canadians: A Portrait of a Country and Its People'rom women's issues to terrorism to Islamophobia, Of Hockey and Hijab takes the reader on a journey to explore many contemporary issues affecting Muslims in Canada and abroad. Khan's book is a must read for all.'?heema Khan reflects on issues ranging from discrimination from others to religious patriarchy from within, faced by her Muslim coreligionists in Canada and abroad. She does so with empathy, wisdom, and humour, concluding that reasonable accommodation on the part of non-Muslims and a proper reading of the Koran and understanding of the teachings of the prophet Muhammad would lead to an Islam that would be perfectly compatible with Canada ? unique multicultural experiment.'?ichael Adams, President, Environics Institute
This item was reviewed in:
Quill & Quire, January 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Literary Nonfiction. Middle Eastern Studies. African American Studies. Asian American Studies. In these thoughtful essays, Sheema Khan--Canadian hockey mom and Harvard PhD--gives us her own pointed insights on the condition of being a modern and liberal, yet practising Muslim, especially in Canada. Tackling a host of issues, such as terrorism, human rights, Islamic law, women's rights, and the meaning of hijab, she explains Islam to the greater public while calling for mutual understanding and tolerance. She tells us "Why Muslims are angry," and "You can't pigeonhole 1.2 billion Muslims" (post 9/11), while calling on Muslims to "acknowledge the rise of fanaticism." She explains the plausibility of Islamic financing and applies the Charter of Rights to Canada. "Can there be Islamic democracy?" she asks, and then, "Will Quebec adopt France's peculiar brand of liberty?" Provocative and original, even-handed and conciliatory, these essays are an important contribution to an urgent modern debate.
Main Description
This collection of provocative, highly intelligent essays looks at Islamic issues, especially from a Canadian woman's perspective.
Main Description
In these thoughtful essays, Sheema Khan - Candian hockey mom and Harvard PhD - gives us her pointed insights on being a modern and liberal, yet practicing, Muslim, especially in Canada. Tackling a host of issues, such as terrorism and fanaticism, human rights post 9/11, Ismalic law, women's rights, sharia, and the meaning of hijab, she explains Islam to the greater public while calling for mutual understanding and tolerance. She tells us "Why Muslims are angry," and protests, "You can't pigeonhole 1.6 billion Muslims," while calling on Muslims to "acknowledge the rise of fanaticism," She explains the palusibility of Islamic financing and applies the Charter of Rights to Canada. "Can there be Islamic democtracy?" she askes, and then, "Will Quebec adopt France's peculiar brand of liberty?" Provocative and original, even-handed and concilatory, these essays are an important contirbution to an urgent modern debate. I will never see my own country quite the same again. I thank Sheema Khan for lending me her eyes and giving all Canadians the precious and welcome gift of her words. Her insight into everything from religion to hockey - often thought to be the same thing in this country! - is blessed with intelligence and humour. - Roy MacGregor, author of Canadians: A Portrait of a Country and Its People From women's issues to terrorism to Islamophobia, Of Hockey and Hijabtakes the reader on a journey to explore the many contemporary issues affecting Muslims in Canada and abroad. Khan's book is a must read for all - Mona Mazigh, author of Hope and Despair Sheema Khan reflects on issues ranging from discrimination from others to religious patriarchy from within, faced by her Muslim coreligionists in Canada and abroad. She does so with empathy, wisdom, and humour, concluding that reasonable accommodation on the the part of non-Muslims and a proper reading of the Koran and understanding of the teachings of the prophet Muhammad would lead to an Islam that would be perfectly compatible with Canada's unique multicultural experiment. - Michael Adams, Environics Institute, author of Unlikely Utopia

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