Catalogue


Representations of hair in Victorian literature and culture /
by Galia Ofek.
imprint
Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2009.
description
xi, 271 p. : ill. (some col.).
ISBN
9780754661610 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2009.
isbn
9780754661610 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Hair theorized -- Hair fetishized in Victorian culture -- Hair domesticated by male novelists -- Hair fashioned by women authors -- Sensational hair -- Funny hair.
catalogue key
7021433
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
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Summaries
Long Description
Galia Ofek's wide-ranging study elucidates the historical, artistic, literary, and theoretical meanings of the Victorians' preoccupation with hair. Victorian writers and artists, Ofek argues, had a well-developed awareness of fetishism as an overinvestment of value in a specific body part and were fully cognizant of hair's symbolic resonance and its value as an object of commerce. In particular, they were increasingly alert to the symbolic significance of hairstyling. Among the writers and artists Ofek considers are Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Margaret Oliphant, Thomas Carlyle, John Stuart Mill, Herbert Spencer, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, Elizabeth Siddal, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, and Aubrey Beardsley. By examining fiction, poetry, anthropological and scientific works, newspaper reviews and advertisements, correspondence, jewellery, paintings, and cartoons, Ofek shows how changing patterns of power relations between women and patriarchy are rendered anew when viewed through the lens of Victorian hair codes and imagery during the second half of the nineteenth century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study elucidates the historical, artistic, literary and theoretical meanings of the Victorians' preoccupation with hair. Victorian writers and artists, it argues, had an awareness of fetishism as an overinvestment of value in a specific body part and were aware of hair's symbolic resonance and its value as an object of commerce.
Long Description
Galia Ofek's wide-ranging study elucidates the historical, artistic, literary, and theoretical meanings of the Victorians' preoccupation with hair. Victorian writers and artists, Ofek argues, had a well-developed awareness of fetishism as an overinvestment of value in a specific body part and were fully cognizant of hair's symbolic resonance and its value as an object of commerce. In particular, they were increasingly alert to the symbolic significance of hairstyling. Among the writers and artists Ofek considers are Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Margaret Oliphant, Charles Darwin, Anthony Trollope, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Eliza Lynn Linton, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Herbert Spencer, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, and Aubrey Beardsley. By examining fiction, poetry, anthropological and scientific works, newspaper reviews and advertisements, correspondence, jewellery, paintings, and cartoons, Ofek shows how changing patterns of power relations between women and patriarchy are rendered anew when viewed through the lens of Victorian hair codes and imagery during the second half of the nineteenth century.

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