Catalogue


Wilsonian idealism in America /
David Steigerwald.
imprint
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, c1994.
description
xiii, 296 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801429366 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, c1994.
isbn
0801429366 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
701969
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-05:
Steigerwald (Ohio State Univ.) has clearly and cogently examined the rise and decline of Wilsonian idealism from the era of WW I to the present. The work falls into two parts, the first extending from the Wilson era through WW II, the second concentrating on the present and very recent past. In a remarkably lucid and far-reaching study, Steigerwald analyzes the struggles of Woodrow Wilson and Wilsonians in succeeding decades. Among the more recent figures on whom the author provides trenchant comment are Adlai Stevenson, John Kennedy, and Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Steigerwald is knowledgeable and at ease with the ideas and writing of Walter Lippmann and Theodore Lowi, among others. His reading and research are extensive and thorough, as reflected in the bibliography, which new students will find valuable and more experienced scholars might also find useful. One comes away from this study with a respect for the author's grasp of ideas and an interest in reading further. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. L. Silver; Johnson State College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
David Steigerwald chronicles the legacy of Wilsonian idealism from its emergence during World War I through its recent resurgence during Desert Storm. His account encompasses the careers of many prominent twentieth-century political figures and thinkers, including Walter Lippmann, Elihu Root, Newton D. Baker, Raymond Fosdick, Adlai Stevenson, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Theodore Lowi, and Francis Fukuyama.
Unpaid Annotation
David Steigerwald chronicles the legacy of Wilsonian idealism from its emergence during World War I through its recent resurgence during Desert Storm. The first history of this central strain of thought in modern American politics, Steigerwald's wide-ranging account encompasses the careers of many prominent twentieth-century political figures and thinkers, including Walter Lippmann, Elihu Root, Newton D. Baker, Raymond Fosdick, Adlai Stevenson, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Theodore Lowi, and Francis Fukuyama. At the beginning of the twentieth century, massive cultural and political pressures threatened to undermine the liberal tradition by dissolving faith in human reason. A group of moderate thinkers attempting to salvage that faith rallied behind Woodrow Wilson's conception of world order. Through the American internationalist movement, these Wilsonian liberals defended the proposition that decisions based on enlightened self-interest would lead to political harmony, and they strove to institutionalize their principles through the formation of the League of Nations. As he traces the fate of universal ideals through American political thought, Steigerwald describes how the Wilsonians remained committed to the free market in the face of war and depression and continued to oppose interest groups in spite of the emergence of mass politics. In addition to demonstrating the capacity of Wilsonianism for regeneration and sustained influence, Steigerwald reveals the ironies that have attended its persistence across the century. Throughout some of the most horrendous events in history, he shows, Wilsonian idealism adhered to fundamental beliefs in international rule of law and in the beneficence oftechnological progress and liberal capitalism.
Table of Contents
prefacep. ix
Liberalism between Two Worldsp. 2
Liberal Idealism and Woodrow Wilsonp. 18
The Idealist Synthesis in American Internationalismp. 39
Wilson Meets Modernityp. 62
Barbarians at the Gatep. 84
The Red Decadep. 105
The Second Chance?p. 131
The Dialectic of Realism and Faithp. 168
A Tradition in Disreputep. 204
Idealism in the Age of the New Politicsp. 244
Bibliographyp. 270
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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