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Pashas : traders and travellers in the Islamic world /
James Mather.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
description
xvii, 302 p.
ISBN
0300126395 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780300126396 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.
isbn
0300126395 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780300126396 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue: Jerusalem -- pt. 1. Aleppo -- Trading places -- People of the book -- pt. 2. Constantinople -- Ambassadors' palaces -- Objects of enquiry -- pt. 3. Alexandria -- The last pashas -- Epilogue: Crescent empire.
catalogue key
7018872
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-01-01:
The Levant Company, originally chartered by Queen Elizabeth, monopolized trade with the Ottoman Empire until 1825. Under its governance, individual trading ventures were pursued, with all the risk and gain thereof. The English merchants, referred to as "pashas" (an honorific that the Turks used) were inherently conservative merchants on the make. They were not imperialists; their interest was in making money, not waves. As the balance shifted toward the West, the company remained conservative, unlike the younger, more aggressive East India Company. For 250 years, pashas rubbed shoulders with Muslims and negotiated with Ottoman officials, and their perceptions of this heathen world, and even of Islam itself, softened. Mather's study paints a picture of East-West relations at the dawn of modernity quite different from what we have heard. He comments trenchantly on Mediterranean trade patterns and the evolving of Western commercial and military dominance over the Fertile Crescent. VERDICT Painstakingly researched and eminently readable, this rich book describes an important episode in our past-and one of some current interest. Lay readers who love history will like this, and it will be indispensable to scholars of the period.-David Keymer. Modesto CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] rare feat . . . a work of scholastic merit with direct bearing upon contemporary issues that will appeal to academics and casual readers alike."-- Lydia Beyoud, Middle East Journal
"[A] rare feat . . . a work of scholastic merit with direct bearing upon contemporary issues that will appeal to academics and casual readers alike."-- Lydia Beyoud,Middle East Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, December 2009
Library Journal, January 2010
Guardian UK, June 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Long before they came as occupiers, the British were drawn to the Middle East by the fabled riches of its trade and the enlightened tolerance of its people. This book looks at the Pashas, the merchants and travelers from Europe who discovered an Islamic world that was alluring, dynamic and diverse.
Main Description
Long before they came as occupiers, the British were drawn to the Middle East by the fabled riches of its trade and the enlightened tolerance of its people. The Pashas, merchants and travelers from Europe, discovered an Islamic world that was alluring, dynamic, and diverse. Ranging across two and a half centuries and through the great cities of Istanbul, Aleppo, and Alexandria, James Mather tells the forgotten story of the men of the Levant Company who sought their fortunes in the Ottoman Empire. Their trade brought to the region not only merchants but also ambassadors and envoys, pilgrims and chaplains, families and servants, aristocratic tourists and roving antiquarians. Unlike the nabobs who gathered their fortunes in Bengal, they both respected and learned from the culture they encountered, and their lives provide a fascinating insight into the meeting of East and West before the age of European imperialism. Intriguing, intimate, and original, Pashas brings to life an extraordinary tale of faraway visitors beguiled by a mysterious world of Islam.
Main Description
Long before they came as occupiers, the British were drawn to the Middle East by the fabled riches of its trade and the enlightened tolerance of its people. The Pashas, merchants and travelers from Europe, discovered an Islamic world that was alluring, dynamic, and diverse. Ranging across two and a half centuries and through the great cities of Istanbul, Aleppo, and Alexandria, James Mather tells the forgotten story of the men of the Levant Company who sought their fortunes in the Ottoman Empire. Their trade brought to the region not only merchants but also ambassadors and envoys, pilgrims and chaplains, families and servants, aristocratic tourists and roving antiquarians. Unlike the nabobs who gathered their fortunes in Bengal, they both respected and learned from the culture they encountered, and their lives provide a fascinating insight into the meeting of East and West before the age of European imperialism. Intriguing, intimate, and original,Pashasbrings to life an extraordinary tale of faraway visitors beguiled by a mysterious world of Islam.
Unpaid Annotation
"Long before they came as occupiers, the British were drawn to the Middle East by the fabled riches of its trade and the enlightened tolerance of its people. The 'pashas' - merchants and travelers from Europe - discovered an Islamic world that was alluring, dynamic and diverse." "Ranging across two and a half centuries and through the great cities of Istanbul, Aleppo and Alexandria, James Mather tells the forgotten story of the men of the Levant Company who sought their fortunes in the Ottoman Empire. Their trade brought to the region not only merchants but ambassadors and envoys, pilgrims and chaplains, families and servants, aristocratic tourists and roving antiquarians. Together, their lives provide a fascinating insight into the meeting of East and West before the age of European imperialism."--BOOK JACKET.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xii
Dramatis Personaep. xiv
Map: The Ottoman Empirep. xviii
Prologue: Jerusalemp. 1
Company Menp. 4
Pashasp. 9
Aleppo
Peace and Tradep. 17
Caravansp. 17
In the Lands of the Sultanp. 28
Foundationsp. 36
Trading Placesp. 44
Compass of the Worldp. 44
Apprenticesp. 57
Embarkingp. 65
People of the Bookp. 72
Expatsp. 72
Wilde Beasts of Mankindp. 85
Pax Ottomanap. 90
Constantinople
Galatap. 105
Seated for Sovereigntiep. 105
Blood and Warp. 113
Trustingp. 121
Ambassadorsp. 131
Palacesp. 131
Capitulatingp. 141
Friends and Rivalsp. 152
Objects of Enquiryp. 161
A Mahumetan Philosopherp. 161
Translationsp. 169
Grand Touristsp. 177
Alexandria
Antique Landsp. 191
Gunboatsp. 191
Returnsp. 202
Retreatp. 208
The Last Pashasp. 216
Drinking of the Nilep. 216
Another Enlightenmentp. 225
Eastern Questionsp. 230
Epilogue: Crescent Empirep. 237
Notesp. 245
Bibliographyp. 279
Indexp. 293
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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