Catalogue


The imagination of evil : detective fiction and the modern world /
Mary Evans.
imprint
London ; New York : Continuum, c2009.
description
193 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1847062067 (hbk.), 9781847062062 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Continuum, c2009.
isbn
1847062067 (hbk.)
9781847062062 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7017726
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [176]-181) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Author Mary Evans is Visiting Fellow at the Gender Institute at the London School of Economics, UK.
Reviews
Review Quotes
mention in THES by Karen Shook,16 July 2009
"[Evans] lightly explores a number of works of detective fiction for the past two centuries, seeking to understand how and why murder, in particular, is at the heart of this most popular of genre fictions. In doing so, she also implicitly seeks to understand why so many of us read and reread these novels about murder. While this study surveys a number of detective novels, it is also, more crucially, an examination of the social understanding of evil." Times Higher Education, February 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
A monograph investigating the way in which detective fiction reflects wider issues in society.
Main Description
From its growth in Europe in the nineteenth century, detective fiction has developed into one of the most popular genres of literature and popular culture more widely. In this monograph, Mary Evans examines detective fiction and its complex relationship to the modern and to modernity. She focuses on two key themes: the moral relationship of detection (and the detective) to a particular social world and the attempt to restore and even improve the social world that has been threatened and fractured by a crime, usually that of murder. It is a characteristic of much detective fiction that the detective, the pursuer, is a social outsider: this status creates a complex web of relationships between detective, institutional life and dominant and subversive moralities. Evans questions who and what the detective stands for and suggests that the answer challenges many of our assumptions about the relationship between various moralities in the modern world.
Main Description
From its growth in Europe in the nineteenth century detective fiction has developed into one of the most popular genres of literature and popular culture more widely. In this monograph, Mary Evans examines detective fiction and its complex relationship to the moderns and to modernity. She focuses on two key themes: the moral relationship of detection (and the detective) to a particular social world and the attempt to restore and even improve the social world that has been threatened and fractured by a crime, usually that of murder. It is a characteristic of much detective fiction that the detective, the pursuer, is a social outsider: this status creates a complex web of relationships between detective, institutional life and dominant and subversive moralities. Evans questions who and what the detective stands for and suggests that the answer challenges many of our assumptions about the relationship between various moralities in the modern world. Book jacket.
Bowker Data Service Summary
From its growth in Europe in the 19th century, detective fiction has developed into one of the most popular genres of literature and popular culture more widely. In this monograph, Mary Evans examines detective fiction and its complex relationship to the modern and to modernity.
Long Description
From its growth in Europe in the nineteenth century, detective fiction has developed into one of the most popular genres of literature and popular culture more widely. In this monograph, Mary Evans examines detective fiction and its complex relationship to the modern and to modernity. She focuses on two key themes: the moral relationship of detection (and the detective) to a particular social world and the attempt to restore and even improve the social world that has been threatened and fractured by a crime, usually that of murder. It is a characteristic of much detective fiction that the detective, the pursuer, is a social outsider: this status creates a complex web of relationships between detective, institutional life and dominant and subversive moralities. Evans questions who and what the detective stands for and suggests that the answer challenges many of our assumptions about the relationship between various moralities in the modern world. >
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introduction: Crime Writingp. 1
Making Crimep. 10
The Making of the Detectivep. 24
Detecting the Modernp. 53
Illegal and Immoralp. 76
Are the Times a' Changing?p. 105
The Dream That Failedp. 135
'On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts'p. 15
Notesp. 169
Bibliographyp. 176
Indexp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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