Catalogue


Managing the margins : gender, citizenship, and the international regulation of precarious employment /
by Leah F. Vosko.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010
description
xvii, 311 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199574812 (hbk.) :, 9780199574810 (hbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010
isbn
0199574812 (hbk.) :
9780199574810 (hbk.) :
contents note
Introduction -- Forging a gender contract in early national and international labour regulation -- Constructing and consolidating the standard employment relationship in international regulation -- The partial eclipse of the SER and the dynamics of SER-Centrism in international labour regulations -- Regulating part-time employment : equal treatment and its limits -- Regulating temporary employment : equal treatment, qualified -- Self-employment and the regulation of the emloyment relationship : from equal treatment to effective protection -- Alternatives fo the SER.
catalogue key
7015094
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An invaluable contribution... This integrated approach (linking citizenship, employment norms and gender relations) is so rare because it is so complex, and most significantly it allows us to think about labour market regulations in terms of the actors involved."--Work, Employment, and Society
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using examples from Canada, the US, Australia and the EU, this work probes national and international regulatory responses to the shift from full-time permanent jobs towards part-time, temporary and self-employment. It analyzes their implications for workers most often precariously employed, particularly women and migrants.
Main Description
This book explores the precarious margins of contemporary labor markets. Over the last few decades, there has been much discussion of a shift from full-time permanent jobs to higher levels of part-time and temporary employment and self-employment. Despite such attention, regulatory approaches have not adapted accordingly. Instead, in the absence of genuine alternatives, old regulatory models are applied to new labour market realities, leaving the most precarious forms of employment intact. The book places this disjuncture in historical context and focuses on its implications for workers most likely to be at the margins, particularly women and migrants, using illustrations from Australia, the United States, and Canada, as well as member states of the European Union. Managing the Margins provides a rigorous analysis of national and international regulatory approaches, drawing on original and extensive qualitative and quantitative material. It innovates by analyzing the historical and contemporary interplay of employment norms, gender relations, and citizenship boundaries.
Main Description
This book explores the precarious margins of contemporary labour markets. Over the last few decades, there has been much discussion of a shift from full-time permanent jobs to higher levels of part-time and temporary employment and self-employment. Despite such attention, regulatory approacheshave not adapted accordingly. Instead, in the absence of genuine alternatives, old regulatory models are applied to new labour market realities, leaving the most precarious forms of employment intact. The book places this disjuncture in historical context and focuses on its implications for workersmost likely to be at the margins, particularly women and migrants, using illustrations from Australia, the United States, and Canada, as well as member states of the European Union. Managing the Margins provides a rigorous analysis of national and international regulatory approaches, drawing on original and extensive qualitative and quantitative material. It innovates by analyzing the historical and contemporary interplay of employment norms, gender relations, and citizenshipboundaries.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xv
List of Tablesp. xvi
List of Abbreviationsp. xvii
Introductionp. 1
Precarious Employmentp. 2
An Integrated Analysisp. 3
The Normative Model of Employmentp. 3
The Gender Contractp. 6
Citizenship Boundariesp. 9
Regulations at Different Scalesp. 13
A Multi-Method Approachp. 15
The Book in Briefp. 17
Forging a Gender Contract in Early National and International Labour Regulationp. 26
Select National Developments, 1830s-1930sp. 27
Hours and Night Workp. 28
Wagesp. 32
Dangerous Substances and Occupationsp. 34
Maternity Protectionp. 36
International Developments, 1870s-1919p. 37
Consensus and Contestation around Protecting Women, 1878-1913p. 38
The Consolidation of Female Caregiving and the Birth of the ILO, 1919p. 43
Preparing the Ground for the SERp. 48
Constructing and Consolidating the Standard Employment Relationship in International Labour Regulationp. 51
Constructing the Pillars of the SER: The Interwar and Immediate Postwar Yearsp. 52
The Bilateral Employment Relationshipp. 52
Standardized Working Timep. 54
Continuous Employmentp. 58
Reinforcing the Pillars: Freedom of Association and Collective Bargainingp. 61
Migrant Workp. 62
Stripping the SER of its Exclusions: The Era of Formal Equalityp. 65
Equal Remuneration, Maternity, and Social Securityp. 65
Non-Discriminationp. 67
The Resilience of the Baselinep. 70
The Partial Eclipse of the SER and the Dynamics of SER-Centrism in International Labour Regulationsp. 73
A Portrait of the SER in Australia, Canada, the EU 15, and the United States, 1980s-2006p. 74
The Declining Significance of Full-Time Permanent Employmentp. 74
The Expansion of Non-Standard Employmentp. 78
SER-Centrism at the Margins of Late-Capitalist Labour Marketsp. 80
Continuing Adjustments to the Crumbling Gender Contract, 1975-1990p. 81
Consolidating a Multi-Tiered Framework for Migrant Workers' Protectionp. 82
The Social Declaration (1998) and 'Decent Work' (1999, 2008)p. 85
Regulating Part-Time, Fixed-Term, Temporary Agency Work, and Self-Employmentp. 87
Regulating Part-Time Employment: Equal Treatment and its Limitsp. 95
The Deterioration of Standardized Working Timep. 96
SER-Centric Responses to Precariousness in Part-Time Employment: The ILO Convention on Part-Time Work (1994)p. 100
Regulating Part-Time Employment in Australiap. 103
The Management of the Margins of the Australian Labour Marketp. 105
Dynamics of Part-Time Casual Employment in Australia: Gendered Precariousnessp. 107
Strategies for Limiting Precariousness amongst Part-Time Workers in Australiap. 109
'Work Choices'p. 114
The Australian Labor Party: Working with Work Choicesp. 115
Lessons from Australia and Alternative Possibilitiesp. 117
Regulating Temporary Employment: Equal Treatment, Qualifiedp. 126
The Erosion of the Open-Ended Employment Relationshipp. 128
SER-Centric Responses to Precariousness in Temporary Employment in the EUp. 133
European Employment Policy Framing Directives on Fixed-Term and Temporary Agency Workp. 133
The EU Directive on Fixed-Term Work (1999)p. 136
Regulating Temporary Agency Work in the EU 15p. 140
National Regulations in the EU 15, Mid-197Os-Early 2000sp. 141
Contemporary Dynamics of Temporary Agency Work in the EU 15p. 143
EU-Level Attempts at Regulating Temporary Agency Work, 2000-2008p. 147
The Directive on Temporary Agency Work (2008)p. 152
Lessons from the EU 15 and Alternative Possibilitiesp. 156
Self-Employment and the Regulation of the Employment Relationship: From Equal Treatment to Effective Protectionp. 165
The Destabilization of the Employment Relationship at the Crux of the SERp. 167
SER-Centric Responses to Precariousness in Work for Remuneration at Cusp of the Employment Relationship: ILO Actions, 1990-2006p. 172
The ILO Recommendation on the Employment Relationship (2006)p. 176
Approaches to Regulating Self-Employment in Industrialized Market Economy Countriesp. 183
Maximizing Enterprise Work: The Australian Casep. 184
Promoting Entrepreneurship and Protecting Economically Dependent Workers: EU Approachesp. 187
Lessons from Industrialized Market Economy Countries and Alternative Possibilitiesp. 196
Alternatives to the SERp. 208
Why there is No Returning to the SERp. 209
A Tiered SERp. 212
A 'Flexible SER'p. 215
'Beyond Employment'p. 218
Towards an Alternative Imaginaryp. 224
Table of Selected International Labour Regulations, 1906-2008p. 230
List of International Labour Conferences Observedp. 233
List of Interviewsp. 234
Data Sources and Notes for Statistical Figures and Tablesp. 236
Bibliography of Primary Sourcesp. 243
Bibliography of Secondary Sourcesp. 256
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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