Catalogue


Nexus of empire : negotiating loyalty and identity in the revolutionary borderlands, 1760s-1820s /
edited by Gene Allen Smith and Sylvia L. Hilton.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2010.
description
375 p.
ISBN
0813033993, 9780813033990 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2010.
isbn
0813033993
9780813033990 (alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
7014291
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-11-01:
If they had owned passports, people living in the Gulf Coast region between Florida and Texas would have had to exchange them repeatedly between 1760 and 1820. During this time, the Spanish, the French, and the British variously governed, until, eventually, the US established itself as the sole political power. The essays discuss the problem of national loyalty and identity that successive changes posed for the peoples of the region. Through brief biographical sketches, the contributors show that despite diverse ethnic backgrounds (Spanish, French, English, Native American, African, etc.), most people were able to shift their loyalties quite easily to the changing circumstances. Out of choice or necessity, these settlers relied "on their own abilities to redefine or negotiate their local community and national identities." Space constraints prevent an adequate discussion of all of the essays here, but each chapter offers different viewpoints and factors to consider in the choices people made when they reinvented their identities. Because of its regional importance, New Orleans receives most attention. A high degree of scholarship characterizes all chapters. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students and faculty. M. J. Van de Logt Benedictine College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
Choice, November 2010
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"Featuring compelling biographical essays on individuals from the key groups who experienced the rapid shifts in national boundaries in the Gulf region, this work opens an exciting new perspective on the problems of identity and loyalty in a transnational world."-Rafe Blaufarb, author ofBonapartists in the Borderlands "A sparkling set of insightful essays that illuminates the interplay of natives, settlers, maroons, and slaves in a in a pivotal borderland contested by rival empires. Local, imperial, and racial identities overlapped in a shifting kaleidoscope of power, resistance, and adaptation."-Alan Taylor, author ofThe Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution Between 1760 and 1820, many groups in North America grappled with differences of identity, nationality, and loyalty tested by revolutionary challenges. Less dramatic, perhaps, but no less important were the stories of individuals redefining themselves as they struggled to survive and prosper in times of both war and peace. Nexus of Empireturns the focus on the people who inhabited one of the continent's most dynamic borderlands- the Gulf of Mexico region-where nations and empires competed for increasingly important strategic and commercial advantages. The essays in this collection do not focus primarily on national groups or large military conflicts. Instead, they examine the personal experiences of men and women, Native Americans, European colonists, free people of color, and slaves, analyzing the ways in which these individuals defined and redefined themselves amid a world of competing loyalties. With its biographical approach, this volume humanizes the promise and perils of living, working, and fighting in a region experiencing constant political upheaval and economic uncertainties. It offers intriguing glimpses into a fast-changing world in which individuals' attitudes and actions reveal the convoluted balancing acts of identities that characterized this population and this era. [cut this last paragraph for length if necessary]
Description for Bookstore
"Featuring compelling biographical essays on individuals from the key groups who experienced the rapid shifts in national boundaries in the Gulf region, this work opens an exciting new perspective on the problems of identity and loyalty in a transnational world."-Rafe Blaufarb, author of Bonapartists in the Borderlands “A sparkling set of insightful essays that illuminates the interplay of natives, settlers, maroons, and slaves in a in a pivotal borderland contested by rival empires. Local, imperial, and racial identities overlapped in a shifting kaleidoscope of power, resistance, and adaptation.”-Alan Taylor, author of The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution Between 1760 and 1820, many groups in North America grappled with differences of identity, nationality, and loyalty tested by revolutionary challenges. Less dramatic, perhaps, but no less important were the stories of individuals redefining themselves as they struggled to survive and prosper in times of both war and peace. Nexus of Empireturns the focus on the people who inhabited one of the continent's most dynamic borderlands- the Gulf of Mexico region-where nations and empires competed for increasingly important strategic and commercial advantages. The essays in this collection do not focus primarily on national groups or large military conflicts. Instead, they examine the personal experiences of men and women, Native Americans, European colonists, free people of color, and slaves, analyzing the ways in which these individuals defined and redefined themselves amid a world of competing loyalties. With its biographical approach, this volume humanizes the promise and perils of living, working, and fighting in a region experiencing constant political upheaval and economic uncertainties. It offers intriguing glimpses into a fast-changing world in which individuals' attitudes and actions reveal the convoluted balancing acts of identities that characterized this population and this era. [cut this last paragraph for length if necessary]
Description for Bookstore
"Featuring compelling biographical essays on individuals from the key groups who experienced the rapid shifts in national boundaries in the Gulf region, this work opens an exciting new perspective on the problems of identity and loyalty in a transnational world."-Rafe Blaufarb, author of Bonapartists in the Borderlands "A sparkling set of insightful essays that illuminates the interplay of natives, settlers, maroons, and slaves in a in a pivotal borderland contested by rival empires. Local, imperial, and racial identities overlapped in a shifting kaleidoscope of power, resistance, and adaptation."-Alan Taylor, author of The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution Between 1760 and 1820, many groups in North America grappled with differences of identity, nationality, and loyalty tested by revolutionary challenges. Less dramatic, perhaps, but no less important were the stories of individuals redefining themselves as they struggled to survive and prosper in times of both war and peace. Nexus of Empireturns the focus on the people who inhabited one of the continent's most dynamic borderlands- the Gulf of Mexico region-where nations and empires competed for increasingly important strategic and commercial advantages. The essays in this collection do not focus primarily on national groups or large military conflicts. Instead, they examine the personal experiences of men and women, Native Americans, European colonists, free people of color, and slaves, analyzing the ways in which these individuals defined and redefined themselves amid a world of competing loyalties. With its biographical approach, this volume humanizes the promise and perils of living, working, and fighting in a region experiencing constant political upheaval and economic uncertainties. It offers intriguing glimpses into a fast-changing world in which individuals' attitudes and actions reveal the convoluted balancing acts of identities that characterized this population and this era. [cut this last paragraph for length if necessary]
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations, Maps, and Tablesp. vii
Changing Flags and Political Uncertainty
Introductionp. 3
Loyalty and Patriotism on North American Frontiers: Being and Becoming Spanish in the Mississippi Valley, 1776-1803p. 8
Dilemmas Among Native Americans and Free Blacks
"Like to Have Made a War among Ourselves": The Creek Indians and the Coming of the War of the Revolutionp. 39
Louis LeClerc De Milford, a.k.a. General Francois Tastanegy: An Eighteenth-Century French Adventurer among the Creeksp. 63
Marie Thérèze dit Coincoin: A Free Black Woman on the Louisiana-Texas Frontierp. 89
To Strike a Balance: New Orleans' Free Colored Community and the Diplomacy of William Charles Cole Claibornep. 113
Dehahuit: An Indian Diplomat on the Louisiana-Texas Frontier, 1804-1815p. 140
Building Fortunes through Family Connections and Local Community
The Nature of Loyalty: Antonio Gil Ibarvo and the East Texas Frontierp. 163
Philip Livingston, Chameleon "Premier" of West Floridap. 183
Oliver Pollock and the Creation of an American Identity in Spanish Colonial Louisianap. 198
Bordermakers and Landed Women: The Rouquier Sisters of Colonial Natchitochesp. 219
Daniel Clark: Merchant Prince of New Orleansp. 241
Personal Ambition in Government and Military Service
William Dunbar, William Claiborne, and Daniel Clark: Intersections of Loyalty and National Identity on the Florida Frontierp. 271
"Motivated Only by the Love of Humanity": Arsène Lacarrière Latour and the Struggle for the Southwestp. 298
Soldier, Expansionist, Politician: Eleazer Wheelock Ripley and the Dance of Ambition in the Early Republicp. 321
Conclusionp. 347
Contributorsp. 355
Indexp. 395
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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