Catalogue

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Shouting, embracing, and dancing with ecstasy : the growth of Methodism in Newfoundland, 1774-1874 /
Calvin Hollett.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2010.
description
xviii, 368 p. : ill., maps. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780773536715
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2010.
isbn
9780773536715
catalogue key
7011092
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Shouting, Embracing, and Dancing with Ecstasy is an excellent, carefully constructed, and well-expressed work that covers a remarkable range of sources. Calvin Hollett has written a revealing account not only of an important aspect of the history of religion in Newfoundland and Canada but of the history of Methodism generally. " Peter Neary, Department of History, University of Western Ontario
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Summaries
Main Description
Contesting previous historical scholarship, Calvin Hollett argues that the growth in Methodism was not the result of clergy-dominated missionary work intended to rescue a degenerated populace. Instead, the author shows how Methodism flourished as a people's movement in which believers in coastal locations were free to experience individual and communal rapture and welcomed at lay revivals in more populous areas. An insightful look at the growth of a religion, Shouting, Embracing, and Dancing with Ecstasy reasserts the importance of laypeople in religious matters, while detailing successful ways to bring the religious experience into daily life.
Main Description
In the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century, Newfoundlanders, who often lived in small, mobile communities where they supported themselves with strenuous work and ingenuity, increasingly broke away from Anglicanism to find joy and comfort in the Methodist tradition. In this remarkable study of a region's reasons for changing how they practiced their faith, Shouting, Embracing, and Dancing with Ecstasy presents a unique perspective on the histories of Methodism and Newfoundland. Contesting previous historical scholarship, Calvin Hollett argues that the growth in Methodism was not the result of clergy-dominated missionary work intended to rescue a degenerated populace. Instead, the author shows how Methodism flourished as a people's movement in which believers in coastal locations were free to experience individual and communal rapture and welcomed at lay revivals in more populous areas. An insightful look at the growth of a religion, Shouting, Embracing, and Dancing with Ecstasy reasserts the importance of laypeople in religious matters, while detailing successful ways to bring the religious experience into daily life.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. xiii
Prefacep. xv
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Mapsp. xix
Introductionp. 3
Newfoundland Methodism as Social Historyp. 12
Methodism and Newfoundland Religion in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 37
Dialectical Tensions within Methodismp. 55
Newfoundland Methodism and the Question of Distinctivenessp. 83
Early Methodism in Conception Bay, St John's, and Trinity Bayp. 111
Bonavista and Bonavista Bayp. 131
Twillingate and Notre Dame Bayp. 152
Burin and Placentia Bayp. 186
Grand Bank, Fortune, and the South Coastp. 221
Conclusionp. 249
Notesp. 261
Bibliographyp. 331
Indexp. 35
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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