Catalogue


Arctic scientist, gulag survivor : the biography of Mikhail Mikhailovich Ermolaev, 1905-1991 /
by A.M. Ermolaev and V.D. Dibner ; translated and edited by William Barr.
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2009.
description
xiv, 591 p. : ill., ports., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1552382567, 9781552382561
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Calgary : University of Calgary Press, c2009.
isbn
1552382567
9781552382561
general note
Co-published by the Arctic Institute of North America.
Includes index.
Translation of: Mikhail Mikhailovich Ermolaev: zhizn' issledovatelya i uchenogo.
catalogue key
7009406
 
Includes bibliographical references: p. 541-551.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
William Barr is a research fellow at the Arctic Institute of North America. A glacial geomorphologist by training, his major research focus is extensively. In May 2006, he received a lifetime achievement award from the Canadian Historical Association for his contributions to the historiography of the Canadian North.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-06-01:
This book is about a remarkable man, Mikhail Mikhailovich Ermolaev, an eminent Russian Arctic scientist and a survivor of Stalin's brutal Gulags. W. Barr, who met both M. M. Ermolaev and his son Aleksei (one of the authors) in 1989 during a visit to the UK's Scott Polar Research Institute, translated this work from the original Russian. Mikhail spent 14 years as a researcher working in the Russian Arctic on diverse areas within geology, geophysics, and geochemistry (documented in Chapters 2-7). In 1938, he was arrested as "an enemy of the people" and sent to a logging camp for correctional hard labor. (The book details the extraordinary brutality of the Soviet forced labor camps.) However, his skill and talents were such that he and others were entrusted to supervise the building of the Knyazh-Vorkuta railway, which headed northeast to cross the Pechora River and toward the Arctic Ocean. In 1945, Ermolaev was released and posted to the Committee on Geological Affairs. In July of that year, he was appointed as chief geologist for the entire Northern Geological Administration, and he taught at Lenningrad University from 1959 to 1971. He died in 1991. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and all levels of undergraduate students interested in Arctic and/or Soviet studies. J. T. Andrews University of Colorado at Boulder
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
One of the most prominent Soviet Arctic scientists of the 1920s and 1930s, Mikhail Mikhailovich Ermolaev was a geologist, physicist, and oceanographer. After working in the Arctic for some thirteen years, he was arrested by the NKVD, convicted on a trumped-up charge of "sabotage," and sent to the Gulag for ten years. After barely surviving a year of correctional hard labour in a lumber camp, Ermolaev was appointed to a sharashka , or professional team, which was charged with extending the railroad to the coal mines of Vorkuta in the farthest reaches of northeast Russia. Still later, he and his family were exiled to Syktyvkar and Arkhangel'sk. Remarkably, Ermolaev was eventually able to resume his academic career, ultimately establishing a new Department of the Geography of the Oceans at Kaliningrad State University. Translated from the original Russian and edited by William Barr, this biography is a fascinating personal account typical of the experiences of so many Soviet citizens who were unjustly banished to the infamous Gulag. Because Ermolaev was part of a specialist team, the conditions he and his family endured were better than most, with reasonably comfortable quarters and relatively adequate food. However, his story still clearly illustrates the brutality and inhumanity of the system. Ermolaev's son, Aleksei, was one of the authors of the original Russian-language biography published in 2005. His own recollections of his father's arrest and of the family's experiences while his father was in the Gulag, along with an excellent selection of family photographs, infuse Arctic Scientist, Gulag Survivor with a sense of immediacy and personal connection. Thanks to the expertise of William Barr, Ermolaev's story is now available in English for the first time.
Main Description
One of the most prominent Soviet Arctic scientists of the 1920s and 1930s, Mikhail Mikhailovich Ermolaev was a geologist, physicist, and oceanographer. After working in the Arctic for some thirteen years, he was arrested by the NKVD, convicted on a trumped-up charge of "sabotage", and sent to the Gulag for ten years. After barely surviving a year of correctional hard labour in a lumber camp, Ermolaev was appointed to a sharashka, or professional team, which was charged with extending the railroad to the coal mines of Vorkuta in the farthest reaches of northeast Russia. Still later, he and his family were exiled to Syktyvkar and Arkhangel'sk. Remarkably, Ermolaev was eventually able to resume his academic career, ultimately establishing a new Department of the Geography of the Oceans at Kaliningrad State University. Translated from the original Russian and edited by William Barr, this biography is a fascinating personal account typical of the experiences of so many Soviet citizens who were unjustly banished to the infamous Gulag. Because Ermolaev was part of a specialist team, the conditions he and his family endured were better than most, with reasonably comfortable quarters and relatively adequate food. However, his story still clearly illustrates the brutality and inhumanity of the system. Ermolaev's son, Aleksei, was one of the authors of the original Russian-language biography published in 2005. His own recollections of childhood in the Gulag, along with an excellent selection of family photographs, infuse this book with a sense of immediacy and personal connection. Thanks to the expertise of William Barr, Ermolaev's story is now available in English for the first time.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is story of one of the most prominent Soviet Arctic scientists of the 1920s and 1930s, Mikhail Mikhailovich Ermolaev, geologist, physicist, and oceanographer. After working in the Arctic for some 13 years, he was arrested by the NKVD, convicted on a trumped-up charge of 'sabotage', and sent to the Gulag for ten years.
Table of Contents
Translator#x0027;s forewordp. vii
Authors#x0027; prefacep. xi
Childhood and youthp. l
The Arctic saves Ermolaevp. 35
The Lyakhovskie Ostrovap. 57
Basic investigations on Novaya Zemlyap. 93
The First and Second High-Latitude Expeditions on board the icebreaker Sadkop. 141
In Leningrad (1936-37)p. 151
The Third High-Latitude Expedition on board Sadkop. 163
Arrested twice and convicted twicep. 211
Ukhtpechlag Building the Vorkuta railroadp. 257
The exile-Chief geologistp. 303
Return to Leningradp. 345
At Leningrad University (19sq-71)p. 375
Kaliningrad (1970-83)p. 417
With his familyp. 439
The last yearsp. 461
A survey of M.M. Ermolaev's major works (1948-70)p. 489
Introduction to Physical Geographyp. 511
M.M. Ermolaev's scientific legacyp. 515
Notesp. 525
Bibliographyp. 541
Glossariesp. 553
Indexp. 557
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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