Catalogue


Joseph Conrad and the reader : questioning modern theories of narrative and readership /
Amar Acheraïou.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
x, 233 p.
ISBN
0230228119 (hbk.), 9780230228115 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230228119 (hbk.)
9780230228115 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7005811
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-09-01:
In this volume, Acheraiou considers a topic that has received relatively little attention: the relationship between author and reader in Conrad's works. The author argues for a relationship between the two in which each contributes to the meaning of Conrad's works. He also believes Conrad's views regarding the reader come out of both classical and 18th-century narrative traditions. Though in places Acheraiou belabors certain aspects of his argument, overall he offers a solid treatment that suggests a new way of looking at Conrad's works and their relationship to narrative and audience. A useful contribution to the field of Conrad studies. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. G. Peters University of North Texas
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Choice, September 2010
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This challenging study is the first monograph fully devoted to Conrad's relation to the reader, visual theory, and authorship
Long Description
Conrad and the Reader is the first monograph fully devoted to Conrad's relation to the reader, visual theory, and authorship. This challenging study proposes new venues to modern literary criticism. Through sharp textual analyses and original comparative approaches, it highlights the theoretical and empirical limits of deconstructionist theories: death-of-the-author, text as an absolute semiotic sign, and reader as a hegemonic interpretative agency. In the process, it introduces several cutting-edge theoretical concepts: the text as a tripartite transaction; the notion of subliminal readers; para-fictional readers; authorial dissemination; and reading as an act of solidarity. This book examines Conrad's ethics of readership and visuality in the light of modern experimentalist writers like Fielding, Sterne, Diderot, and Flaubert, as well as in relation to ancient theories of narrative formulated by Aristotle, Plato, Horace, Quintilian, Cicero, and Plutarch.
Long Description
Conrad and the Reader is the first monograph fully devoted to Joseph Conrad's relation to the reader, visual theory, and authorship. This challenging study proposes new avenues to modern literary criticism. Through sharp textual analyses and original comparative approaches, it highlights the theoretical and empirical limits of deconstructionist theories: death-of-the-author, text as an absolute semiotic sign, and reader as a hegemonic interpretative agency. In the process, it introduces several cutting-edge theoretical concepts: the text as a tripartite transaction; the notion of subliminal readers; para-fictional readers; authorial dissemination; and reading as an act of solidarity. This book examines Conrad's ethics of readership and visuality in the light of modern experimentalist writers like Fielding, Sterne, Diderot, and Flaubert, as well as in relation to ancient theories of narrative formulated by Aristotle, Plato, Horace, Quintilian, Cicero, and Plutarch.
Library of Congress Summary
"Joseph Conrad and the Reader is the first book fully devoted to Conrad's relation to the reader, visual theory and authorship. This challenging study proposes new approaches to modern literary criticism and deftly examines the limits of deconstructionist theories, introducing groundbreaking new theoretical concepts of reading and reception"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Joseph Conrad and the Reader is the first book fully devoted to Conrad's relation to the reader, visual theory and authorship. This challenging study proposes new approaches to modern literary criticism and deftly examines the limits of deconstructionist theories, introducing groundbreaking new theoretical concepts of reading and reception.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Theoretical Perspectives
Conrad's Conception of Authorship: Probing the Implications and Limits of the Death-of-the-Author Theoryp. 11
Reception Theory: Reading as a Cultural and Ideological Construct
Polish Responses: Art and the Ethics of Collectivityp. 25
British Reception: Englishness and the Act of Readingp. 49
Aesthetic Ramifications, Narrative Entanglements, and Fictional Readers
Conrad's Visual Aesthetics: Classical and Modern Connectionsp. 69
A Cartography of Conrad's Fictional Readers: Reading Hierarchy in Lord Jim, 'Heart of Darkness', Nostromo, and Victoryp. 94
Narrative Solidarity and Competition for Truth and Significationp. 110
Conrad and the Construction of the Reader: Tension between Democratic Vision and Aristocratic Leaningp. 123
Narrative Self-Consciousness and the Act of Reading: Examining Under Western Eyes through the Lens of the Poetics of Fielding, Sterne, and Diderotp. 143
Fielding, Sterne, and Diderot: literary novelty, verisimilitude, and truthp. 143
Fielding, Sterne, Diderot, and Conrad: moral and aesthetic didacticismp. 150
Dramatic impulse in Under Western Eyes: text as stage, reader as active spectatorp. 161
Narrative shock tactics: the ethics of negativity and the role of the readerp. 167
Conclusionp. 185
Notesp. 193
Referencesp. 214
Index of Names and Titlesp. 223
Index of Conceptsp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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