Catalogue


Black Mexico : race and society from colonial to modern times /
edited by Ben Vinson III and Matthew Restall.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2009.
description
xiv, 278 p.
ISBN
0826347010 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780826347015 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2009.
isbn
0826347010 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780826347015 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Slave rebellion and liberty in colonial Mexico / Frank "Trey" Proctor III -- Negotiating two worlds : the free-Black experience in Guerrero's tierra caliente / Andrew B. Fisher -- Black aliens and Black natives in New Spain's indigenous communities / Pat Carroll -- From dawn 'till dusk : Black labor in late colonial Mexico / Ben Vinson III -- Colonial middle men? : mulatto identity in New Spain's confraternities / Nicole von Germeten -- Potions and perils : love-magic in seventeenth-century Afro-Mexico and Afro-Yucatan / Joan Bristol and Matthew Restall -- "Afro" Mexico in Black, white, and Indian : an anthropologist reflects on fieldwork / Laura A. Lewis -- My blackness and theirs : viewing Mexican blackness up close / Bobby Vaughn -- The Thorntons : saga of an Afro-Mexican family / Alva Moore Stevenson -- The need to recognize Afro-Mexicans as an ethnic group / Jean-Philibert Mobwa Mobwa N'djoli.
catalogue key
7005801
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ben Vison III is professor of history and Director of the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of Bearing Arms for His Majesty: The Free-Colored Militia in Colonial Mexico, Flight: The Story of Virgil Richardson, A Tuskegee Airman in Mexico, and coauthor of African Slavery in Latin America and the Caribbean. Matthew Restall is Edwin Erie Sparks Professor of History and Director of Latin American Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Restall is the author of Beyond Black and Red: African-Native Relations in Colonial Latin America (UNMP), Invading Guatemala: Spanish, Nahua, and Maya Accounts of the Conquest Wars (coauthor), Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest, The Maya World, and The Black Middle: Africans, Mayas, and Spaniards in Colonial Yucatn.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-08-01:
Originating with the 2004 symposium New Directions in North American Scholarship on Afro-Mexico, the entries are anchored by Vinson's introduction, which establishes the setting from which previous examinations of the topic occurred, and includes a concise historiography. Readers transition into works by historians, anthropologists, and a Latin Americanist. The contributors and their essays demonstrate clear expertise on Mexico, providing the structure for a contemporary chronological overview of blacks in the Mexican milieu. The concluding entry, authored by a Mexican citizen of Congolese origin specializing in issues of discrimination against Afro-Mexicans, smartly leaves readers pondering the present and future of Afro-Mexicans. This entry, along with the others, will encourage readers to explore the subject further. There are compelling justifications to add this title to any library collection. The work will bolster resources in the heavily researched themes of the African diaspora, cultural identity, and race, and will fill a gap in contemporary scholarship exploring blacks in Mexico's history, and that group's identity. The entries are fluid, well structured, and enlightening, making for a gratifying read. With an extensive bibliography and a glossary, the result feels like a handbook on the topic of blacks in Mexico. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. A. G. Garza California State University, Stanislaus
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
Choice, August 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The essays in this collection build upon a series of conversations and papers that resulted from "New Directions in North American Scholarship on Afro-Mexico," a symposium conducted at Pennsylvania State University in 2004. The issues addressed include contested historiography, social and economic contributions of Afro-Mexicans, social construction of race and ethnic identity, forms of agency and resistance, and contemporary inquiry into ethnographic work on Afro-Mexican communities. Comprised of a core set of chapters that examine the colonial period and a shorter epilogue addressing the modern era, this volume allows the reader to explore ideas of racial representation from the sixteenth century into the twenty-first.
Main Description
The essays in this collection build upon a series of conversations and papers that resulted from "New Directions in North American Scholarship on Afro-Mexico," a symposium conducted at Pennsylvania State University in 2004. The issues addressed include contested historiography, social and economic contributions of Afro-Mexicans, social construction of race and ethnic identity, forms of agency and resistance, and contemporary inquiry into ethnographic work on Afro-Mexican communities. Comprised of a core set of chapters that examine the colonial period and a shorter epilogue addressing the modern era, this volume allows the reader to explore ideas of racial representation from the sixteenth century into the twenty-first. Contributors: Joan Bristol, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia Patrick Carroll, Texas A & M University, Corpus Christi Andrew B. Fisher, Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota Nicole von Germeten, Oregon State University, Corvallis Laura A. Lewis, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia Jean-Philibert Mobwa Mobwa N'djoli, Congolese native living in Mexico City Frank "Trey" Proctor III, Denison University, Granville, Ohio Alva Moore Stevenson, University of California, Los Angeles Bobby Vaughn, Notre Dame de Namur University, Belmont, California
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction: Black Mexico and the Historical Disciplinep. 1
Entering the Colonial World
Slave Rebellion and Liberty in Colonial Mexicop. 21
Negotiating Two Worlds: The Free-Black Experience in Guerrero's Tierra Calientep. 51
Black Aliens and Black Natives in New Spain's Indigenous Communitiesp. 72
From Dawn 'til Dusk: Black Labor in Late Colonial Mexicop. 96
Colonial Middle Men? Mulatto identity in New Spain's Confraternitiesp. 136
Potions and Perils: Love-Magic in Seventeenth-Century Afro-Mexico and Afro-Yucatanp. 155
Engaging Modernity
"Afro" Mexico in Black, White, and Indian: An Anthropologist Reflects on Fieldworkp. 183
My Blackness and Theirs: Viewing Mexican Blackness Up Closep. 209
The Thorntons: Saga of an Afro-Mexican Familyp. 220
The Need to Recognize Afro-Mexicans as an Ethnic Groupp. 224
Glossaryp. 233
Bibliographyp. 241
Contributorsp. 266
Indexp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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