Catalogue


In the company of generals : the World War I diary of of Pierpont L. Stackpole /
edited with an introduction by Robert H. Ferrell.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2009.
description
xi, 209 p.
ISBN
0826218709 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780826218704 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2009.
isbn
0826218709 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780826218704 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Beginnings -- Preparation -- Crisis for the Anglo-French -- Giving advice -- To Soissons -- Aisne-Marne -- Aisne-Marne II -- St. Mihiel -- Attack in the Meuse-Argonne -- Second attack -- Third attack -- Fourth and victory -- Epilogue.
catalogue key
7001661
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The considerable insight offered by the Stackpole diary, along with Bob Ferrell's commentary, makes In the Company of Generals a valuable contribution to the scholarship of World War I history. Ferrell's keen intelligence, sharp wit, and pungent style shine through constantly. He pulls no punches, and his remarks offer a nice short history of the high levels of the AEF."- John Milton Cooper Jr., author of The Vanity of Power: American Isolationism and the First World War, 1914–1917 and Breaking the Heart of the World: Woodrow Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations
"The considerable insight offered by the Stackpole diary, along with Bob Ferrell's commentary, makes In the Company of Generals a valuable contribution to the scholarship of World War I history. Ferrell's keen intelligence, sharp wit, and pungent style shine through constantly. He pulls no punches, and his remarks offer a nice short history of the high levels of the AEF."- John Milton Cooper Jr., author of The Vanity of Power: American Isolationism and the First World War, 19141917 and Breaking the Heart of the World: Woodrow Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
Pierpont Stackpole was a Boston lawyer who in January 1918 became aide to Lieutenant General Hunter Liggett, soon to be commander of the first American corps in France. Stackpole's diary, published here for the first time, is a major eyewitness account of the American Expeditionary Forces' experience on the Western Front, offering an insider's view into the workings of Liggett's commands, his day-to-day business, and how he orchestrated his commands in trying and confusing situations. Hunter Liggett did not fit John J. Pershing's concept of the trim and energetic officer, but Pershing entrusted to him a corps and then an army command. Liggett assumed leadership of the U.S. First Army in mid-October of 1918, and after reorganizing, reinforcing, and resting, the battle-weary troops broke through the German lines in a fourth attack at the Meuse-Argonne-accomplishing what Pershing had failed to do in three previous attempts. The victory paved the way to armistice on November 11. Liggett has long been a shadowy figure in the development of the American high command. He was "Old Army," a veteran of Indian wars who nevertheless kept abreast of changes in warfare and more than other American officers was ready for the novelties of 19141918. Because few of his papers have survived, the diary of his aide-who rode in the general's staff car as Liggett unburdened himself about fellow generals and their sometimes abysmal tactical notions-provides especially valuable insights into command within the AEF. Stackpole's diary also sheds light on other figures of the war, presenting a different view of the controversial Major General Clarence Edwards than has recently been recorded and relating the general staff's attitudes about the flamboyant aviation figure Billy Mitchell. General Liggett built the American army in France, and the best measure of his achievement is this diary of his aide. That record stands here as a fascinating and authentic look at the Great War.
Main Description
Pierpont Stackpole was a Boston lawyer who in January 1918 became aide to Lieutenant General Hunter Liggett, soon to be commander of the first American corps in France. Stackpole’s diary, published here for the first time, is a major eyewitness account of the American Expeditionary Forces’ experience on the Western Front, offering an insider’s view into the workings of Liggett’s commands, his day-to-day business, and how he orchestrated his commands in trying and confusing situations. Hunter Liggett did not fit John J. Pershing’s concept of the trim and energetic officer, but Pershing entrusted to him a corps and then an army command. Liggett assumed leadership of the U.S. First Army in mid-October of 1918, and after reorganizing, reinforcing, and resting, the battle-weary troops broke through the German lines in a fourth attack at the Meuse-Argonne-accomplishing what Pershing had failed to do in three previous attempts. The victory paved the way to armistice on November 11. Liggett has long been a shadowy figure in the development of the American high command. He was “Old Army,” a veteran of Indian wars who nevertheless kept abreast of changes in warfare and more than other American officers was ready for the novelties of 1914–1918. Because few of his papers have survived, the diary of his aide-who rode in the general’s staff car as Liggett unburdened himself about fellow generals and their sometimes abysmal tactical notions-provides especially valuable insights into command within the AEF. Stackpole’s diary also sheds light on other figures of the war, presenting a different view of the controversial Major General Clarence Edwards than has recently been recorded and relating the general staff’s attitudes about the flamboyant aviation figure Billy Mitchell. General Liggett built the American army in France, and the best measure of his achievement is this diary of his aide. That record stands here as a fascinating and authentic look at the Great War.
Main Description
In 1918 Pierpont Stackpole became aide to Lieutenant General Hunter Liggett, soon to be commander of the first American corps in France. Stackpoles diary, published here for the first time, is a major eyewitness account of the American Expeditionary Forces experience on the Western Front, offering an insiders view into the workings of Liggetts commands, his day-to-day business, and how he orchestrated his commands in trying and confusing situations.
Table of Contents
Maps and Photographsp. vii
Acknoledgementp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Beginingsp. 7
Preparationp. 26
Crisis-for the Anglo-Frenchp. 39
Giving Advicep. 53
To Soissonsp. 84
Aisne-Marne Ip. 103
Asine-Marne IIp. 113
St. Mihielp. 129
Attack in the Meuse-Argonnep. 140
Second Attackp. 155
Third Attackp. 166
Fourth-and Victoryp. 180
Epiloguep. 193
Biblographyp. 195
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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