Catalogue


What's really wrong with the Middle East /
Brian Whitaker.
imprint
London ; Saint Paul, Minn. : Saqi, 2009.
description
384 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0863566243 (hbk.) :, 9780863566240 (hbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; Saint Paul, Minn. : Saqi, 2009.
isbn
0863566243 (hbk.) :
9780863566240 (hbk.) :
catalogue key
6998833
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brian Whitaker was Middle East editor at the Guardian for seven years and is currently an editor for the newspaper's Comment is Free website. He is the author of Unspeakable Love: Gay and Lesbian Life in Middle East (Saqi, 2006). His website, www.al-bab.com, is devoted to Arab culture and politics.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2010-04-26:
According to Whitaker (Unspeakable Love), former Middle East editor at the Guardian, the various political, economic, and human rights deficits are too commonly shrugged off by the Middle East's civil society as "someone else's fault." While acknowledging the huge impact of European colonialism, foreign interventions, and despotic leaders, Whitaker argues persuasively that "if Arabs are ever to take charge of their predicament they must stop asking "How did we get here?' and instead say "How can we move forward?' " In looking for answers, Whitaker brings the conversation to the actual populations struggling against stultifying authoritarianism, cultural stagnation, corruption, and deep-rooted inequalities, in the process revealing "the debate among Arabs themselves about change-a debate that many in the west are still largely unaware of." His analysis is accessible and instructive, and cuts deep, settling neither for easy explanations nor simple solutions. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, November 2009
Publishers Weekly, April 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Western governments see the Middle East only in terms of its impact on the West. But how do people in the Middle East view their own countries, governments and institutions? This title analyses the views of Arabs living in the regions and articulates the opportunities and challenges facing ordinary men and women.
Main Description
"A passionate call for political and social change in Arab countries . . . and a stern critique of the status quo."Jeremy Bowen, BBC Middle East editor The problems in the Middle East are always someone else's fault. While the West blames dictators and extremists, Arabs often blame centuries of foreign interference. For many, both in the East and West, the root problem is a lack of freedom. Looking beyond the turmoil reported on our TV screens, Guardian journalist Brian Whitaker examines the "freedom deficit" that affects Arabs in their daily lives: their struggles against corruption, discrimination, and bureaucracy, and the stifling authoritarianism that pervades homes, schools, and mosques as well as presidential palaces. Drawing on a wealth of new research and wide-ranging interviews, Whitaker analyzes the views of Arabs living in the region and argues that in order to achieve peace, prosperity, and full participation in today's global economy, Arabs should embrace political and far-reaching social and cultural change. Brian Whitaker was Middle East editor at the Guardian for seven years and is currently an editor for the newspaper's Comment is Free website. He is the author of Unspeakable Love: Gay and Lesbian Life in the Middle East (Saqi Books, 2006; also published in the United States by the University of California Press, 2006). His website, www.al-bab.com, is devoted to Arab culture and politics.
Main Description
While the west blames dictators and extremists, Arabs often blame centuries of foreign interference. For many, both in the east and west, the root problem is a lack of freedom.
Main Description
"A passionate call for political and social change in Arab countries . . . and a stern critique of the status quo."Jeremy Bowen, BBC Middle East editor The problems in the Middle East are always someone else’s fault. While the West blames dictators and extremists, Arabs often blame centuries of foreign interference. For many, both in the East and West, the root problem is a lack of freedom. Looking beyond the turmoil reported on our TV screens, Guardian journalist Brian Whitaker examines the "freedom deficit" that affects Arabs in their daily lives: their struggles against corruption, discrimination, and bureaucracy, and the stifling authoritarianism that pervades homes, schools, and mosques as well as presidential palaces. Drawing on a wealth of new research and wide-ranging interviews, Whitaker analyzes the views of Arabs living in the region and argues that in order to achieve peace, prosperity, and full participation in today’s global economy, Arabs should embrace political and far-reaching social and cultural change. Brian Whitaker was Middle East editor at the Guardian for seven years and is currently an editor for the newspaper’s Comment is Free website. He is the author of Unspeakable Love: Gay and Lesbian Life in the Middle East (Saqi Books, 2006; also published in the United States by the University of California Press, 2006). His website, www.al-bab.com, is devoted to Arab culture and politics.
Main Description
A counter-blast to simplistic Western views about the Middle East.
Main Description
"A passionate call for political and social change in Arab countries . . . and a stern critique of the status quo."Jeremy Bowen, BBC Middle East editorThe problems in the Middle East are always someone else's fault.While the West blames dictators and extremists, Arabs often blame centuries of foreign interference. For many, both in the East and West, the root problem is a lack of freedom.Looking beyond the turmoil reported on our TV screens, Guardian journalist Brian Whitaker examines the "freedom deficit" that affects Arabs in their daily lives: their struggles against corruption, discrimination, and bureaucracy, and the stifling authoritarianism that pervades homes, schools, and mosques as well as presidential palaces.Drawing on a wealth of new research and wide-ranging interviews, Whitaker analyzes the views of Arabs living in the region and argues that in order to achieve peace, prosperity, and full participation in today's global economy, Arabs should embrace political and far-reaching social and cultural change.Brian Whitaker was Middle East editor at the Guardian for seven years and is currently an editor for the newspaper's Comment is Free website. He is the author of Unspeakable Love: Gay and Lesbian Life in the Middle East (Saqi Books, 2006; also published in the United States by the University of California Press, 2006). His website, www.al-bab.com, is devoted to Arab culture and politics.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. 7
Introductionp. 9
Thinking inside the boxp. 17
The gilded cagep. 48
States without citizensp. 82
The politics of Godp. 115
Vitamin Wp. 148
The urge to controlp. 179
A sea of victimsp. 231
Alien tomatoesp. 260
Escape from historyp. 290
Notesp. 325
Bibliographyp. 371
Indexp. 375
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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