Catalogue


Radical satire and print culture, 1790-1822 /
Marcus Wood.
imprint
Oxford [England] : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1994.
description
xviii, 318 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198112785 (alk. paper) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford [England] : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1994.
isbn
0198112785 (alk. paper) :
catalogue key
699553
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [291]-312) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-02:
Wood explores little-known sources of vigorous radical political satire in Britain, 1815-1822. At its heart were publisher and printer William Hone and caricaturist and printmaker George Cruickshank. Wood's book studies their work, as well as that of such key propagandists as Thomas Spence and Daniel Isaac Eaton. Since the late 18th century, the lower classes had been entering the literary and cultural domain, and hosts of journals, newspapers, children's books, and ads proliferated. Because the lower orders were disenfranchised, disenchantment was widespread. In this climate, religious and political dissidence came of age during the American and French Revolutions. Much of the ensuing satire was richly inventive, vigorous, and extensive; such satire utilized parody as its central weapon, drawing upon mainstream traditions (Swift, Pope, Addison, Defoe, Johnson, Wilkes, Junius, Hogarth, Gillray) as well as employing rich materials from popular culture--chapbooks, ads, accounts, almanacs, mock wills, graffiti, handbills, broadsides, mountebank notices, songs, and nursery rhymes. The resultant study is scholarly and thorough. It is too often assumed that satire "declined" in the 18th century and, in the 19th, virtually disappeared. The present volume rightly challenges that assumption. General and academic audiences. J. R. Clark; University of South Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
''a marvellously rich study, concentrating on the work of William Hone and George Cruikshank ... Marcus Wood's excellent book suggests further questions abou the consumption of revolutionary taste.'Times Literary Supplement' Library 17:4 1995
'an important addition to recent work on popular radicalism in the Romantic period ... There is ... no doubting his claim to have 'stressed the daring and even joyous nature of much radical propaganda' and to have 'examined that work in its own terms and not as a poor cousin to the canon'.That job has been carried out with an admirable combination of enthusiasm and precision.'John Whale, University of Leeds, Review of English Studies, Vol. XLVII, No. 188, Nov '96
"Historians of British popular radicalism have paid too little attention to the satiric element: to how radicals used humor to undermine established authority. Marcus Wood has done much to redress this deficiency..."--American Historical Review
"Historians of British popular radicalism have paid too little attention to the satiric element: to how radicals used humor to undermine established authority. Marcus Wood has done much to redress this deficiency..."-- American Historical Review
'Marcus Wood's book is an important addition to recent work on popular radicalism in the romantic period...uncovering of a "satirical inheritance" is central to his iportant argument about the historical self-conciousness of radical culture...There is no doubting his claim to have stressed thedaring and even joyous nature of much radical propaganda and to have examined that work in its own terms and not as a poor cousin to the canon. That job has been carried out with an admirable combination of enthusiasm and precision.'Review of English Studies
'richly illustrated study'International Review of Social History
Scholars of the more flexibly defined eighteenth century tend to work accross disciplines, looking at continuities and seeking to reconstruct cultural history...Wood's Radical Satire is a significant contribution to that reconstruction...radical Satire is so deeply grounded in archivalresearch and so well informed by critical intelligence that it is one of the most important studies of verbal and visual satires during the period 1700-1822. It is also a very significant historical study of the genre of parody during the long eighteenth century.
'The background materials alone that Radical Satire and Print Culture provides is worth the price of admission to the carnival world of radical satire that this book persuasively reconstructs...The rich anecdotal scene Wood constructs gains momentum into a thoroughly persuasive argument, orseries of arguments,that detail the way in which the radical press waged a linguistic war against the government.'Prose Studies
'valuable and study ... Wood's achievement in presenting the work of Spence and Hone within the framework of the traditions they inherited is undeniable, and his work will be essential for any future understanding of the cultural world in which Romanticism existed.'P.M.S. Dawson, University of Manchester, Romanticism
'Marcus Wood's book is an important addition to recent work on popular radicalism in the romantic period...uncovering of a "satirical inheritance" is central to his iportant argument about the historical self-conciousness of radical culture...There is no doubting his claim to have stressed the daring and even joyous nature of much radical propaganda and to have examined that work in its own terms and not as a poor cousin to the canon. That job has beencarried out with an admirable combination of enthusiasm and precision.'Review of English Studies''a marvellously rich study, concentrating on the work of William Hone and George Cruikshank ... Marcus Wood's excellent book suggests further questions abou the consumption of revolutionary taste.'Times Literary Supplement'Library 17:4 1995'richly illustrated study'International Review of Social History'The background materials alone that Radical Satire and Print Culture provides is worth the price of admission to the carnival world of radical satire that this book persuasively reconstructs...The rich anecdotal scene Wood constructs gains momentum into a thoroughly persuasive argument, or series of arguments,that detail the way in which the radical press waged a linguistic war against the government.'Prose StudiesScholars of the more flexibly defined eighteenth century tend to work accross disciplines, looking at continuities and seeking to reconstruct cultural history...Wood's Radical Satire is a significant contribution to that reconstruction...radical Satire is so deeply grounded in archival research and so well informed by critical intelligence that it is one of the most important studies of verbal and visual satires during the period 1700-1822. It is also a verysignificant historical study of the genre of parody during the long eighteenth century.'valuable and study ... Wood's achievement in presenting the work of Spence and Hone within the framework of the traditions they inherited is undeniable, and his work will be essential for any future understanding of the cultural world in which Romanticism existed.'P.M.S. Dawson, University of Manchester, Romanticism'an important addition to recent work on popular radicalism in the Romantic period ... There is ... no doubting his claim to have 'stressed the daring and even joyous nature of much radical propaganda' and to have 'examined that work in its own terms and not as a poor cousin to the canon'. That job has been carried out with an admirable combination of enthusiasm and precision.'John Whale, University of Leeds, Review of English Studies, Vol. XLVII, No. 188, Nov '96
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1995
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Summaries
Long Description
Radical Satire and Print Culture 1790-1822 focuses on the work produced collaboratively between 1816 and 1822 by the poet and radical journalist William Hone and the brilliant young graphic satirist George Cruikshank. Dr Wood provides a much needed analytical framework for Regency radical satire uncovering a set of new sources and previously unknown cultural contexts for Hone and Cruikshank's work, which is shown to combine modernity and tradition in thrilling ways. Hone fused the literary and political inheritance of eighteenth-century satire with contemporary developments in advertising , popular publishing and mass marketing; Cruikshank combined the sophisticated conventions of the political print with the most up-to-date methods of advertizing, politics and propaganda. Entertaining and original, this is an important contribution to the study of radical satire, which sheds new light on the relations between popular political authors and graphic artists and the major Romantic writers of the period.
Main Description
Focuses on the work produced collaboratively between 1816 and 1822 by the poet and radical journalist William Hone and the brilliant young graphic satirist George Cruikshank.
Main Description
Radical Satire and Print Culture 1790-1822 focuses on the work produced collaboratively between 1816 and 1822 by the poet and radical journalist William Hone and the brilliant young graphic satirist George Cruikshank.Dr Wood provides a much needed analytical framework for Regency radical satire uncovering a set of new sources and previously unknown cultural contexts for Hone and Cruikshank's work, which is shown to combine modernity and tradition in thrilling ways. Hone fused the literary and politicalinheritance of eighteenth-century satire with contemporary developments in advertising , popular publishing and mass marketing; Cruikshank combined the sophisticated conventions of the political print with the most up-to-date methods of advertizing, politics and propaganda.Entertaining and original, this is an important contribution to the study of radical satire, which sheds new light on the relations between popular political authors and graphic artists and the major Romantic writers of the period.
Main Description
Radical Satire and Print Culture 1790-1822 focuses on the work produced collaboratively between 1816 and 1822 by the poet and radical journalist William Hone and the brilliant young graphic satirist George Cruikshank. Wood provides a much needed analytical framework for Regency radical satire uncovering a set of new sources and previously unknown cultural contexts for Hone and Cruikshank's work, which is shown to combine modernity and tradition in thrilling ways. Entertaining and original, this is an important contribution to the study of radical satire, which sheds new light on the relations between popular political authors and graphic artists and the major Romantic writers of the period.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
List of Abbreviations
Introduction: The Potatoes Speak for Themselvesp. 1
Advertising, Politics, and Parody 1710-1780p. 18
Eaton, Spence, and Modes of Radical Subversion in the Revolutionary Erap. 57
Radicals and the Law: Blasphemous Libels and the Three Trials of William Honep. 96
Radical Puffing: Parodic Advertising and Newspapersp. 155
The Political House that Jack Built: Children's Publishing and Political Satirep. 215
Conclusion: Satire, Radicalism, and Radical Romanticismp. 264
Appendix: A Transcription of the Original Manuscript Version of The Late John Wilkes's Catechism of a Ministerial Memberp. 272
Bibliographyp. 291
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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