Catalogue


The politics of black women's hair /
Althea Prince.
imprint
London, Ont. : Insomniac Press, c2009.
description
160 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1897178875, 9781897178874
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London, Ont. : Insomniac Press, c2009.
isbn
1897178875
9781897178874
catalogue key
6992925
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dr. Althea Prince is a sociologist, essayist, and novelist. She teaches at the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education at Ryerson University. Her books include: Loving This Man, Being Black, and the short fiction collection, Ladies of the Night. She also co-edited Feminisms Womanisms: A Women's Studies Reader.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This book offers a refreshing insight into the politics surrounding black women's hair & a moving collection of writings from women across the African Diaspora, sharing their histories & personal experiences' People with voices, July 2011http://peoplewithvoices.com/2011/07/22/book-review-the-politics-of-black-women%E2%80%99s-hair-by-althea-prince/
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
From Madame Walker to United States First Lady Michelle Obama, this series of essays by Althea Prince and others explore the role of hairstyle in Black women's relationships with their mothers, their peers, their self-image, and society as a whole.
Main Description
Sometimes, hair is just hair. Sometimes, it's much more.
Main Description
Sometimes, hair is just hair. Sometimes, it's much more.In 1905, Madame C.J. Walker invented a metal comb that, when heated, transformed black women's hair from tight curls into smooth, straight tresses. The iron comb made her a millionaire, but many black people criticized her for creating a product that made black women's hair imitate white women's long, straight hair.From Madame Walker to First Lady Michelle Obama, this series of essays by Althea Prince and others explores the role of hairstyle in black women's relationships with their mothers, their peers, their self-image, and society as a whole.Althea Prince 's books include Being Black , Loving This Man , and Ladies of the Night . She teaches at Ryerson University in Toronto.
Main Description
From furious debate on the Web about Michelle Obama's straightened hair to keen interest in model Tyra Banks's revelation of the hair she usually hides under wigs and weaves, Black women's hair has taken a prime place on the pop cultural agenda. More than just a fashion statement, a Black woman's choice of hairstyle can reflect her self-image, childhood experiences, and personal beliefs as well. Using interviews, memoirs, and personal essays, this book sensitively charts Black women's journeys with their hair: how it is perceived, judged, and graded on the yardstick of mainstream society's standards of beauty. Women from Canada, the United States, Britain, and the Caribbean discuss their lives through the medium of their hair. Unhappy childhood struggles with the comb, adolescent experiments with identity through hair, and adult decisions for or against "natural" hair are all expressed with honesty, some wry humour, and the poignant realization that hair can be another social battlefield.
Main Description
Dr. Althea Prince follows up her earlier collection of essays (Being Black) on Black cultural life with this important new collection. This book sensitively charts Black women's journeys with their hair: how it is perceived, judged, and graded on the yardstick of mainstream society's standards of beauty.
Table of Contents
Beginning the Walkp. 9
journeying from the core
Ritualsp. 27
touch a black woman's hair
"Who I Am Is in My Hairp. 39"
Guest Essay
Conversations with Young Black Women in Torontop. 53
my conclusions from eyewitnessing, listening, and sometimes listening-in
Anonymousp. 55
Taija Ryanp. 61
Maxine Clarkep. 68
Conversations with Mothers of Black Girlsp. 71
Veronica Ciandrep. 73
Skira Martinezp. 79
Elaine Nash and daughters, Nina and Rainap. 81
Andrea Oliverp. 90
Glenda Princep. 95
Itah Sadup. 98
Embodying the Hair on Our Headsp. 102
versions of hair:
good hair
bad hair
coarse hair
nappy hair
black consciousnessp. 106
about Jennifer Lopez and Beyoncé Knowlesp. 111
me ah say ah one manp. 112
stories held in the heartp. 113
bliss in a straight-hair worldp. 115
Barbara Walters and black women's hairp. 119
Dread and the Baldheadp. 121
Althea Prince is in the housep. 124
women with man-headp. 125
Stokely Carmichael and Miriam Makebap. 127
from epiphany to actionp. 130
Michelle Obama, The First Lady of the United States of Americap. 137
musings on the media, sister-black women, and Michelle Obama's hair
plus, Chris Rock discovers his daughter wants "good hair"
To Locks or not to Locksp. 147
email correspondence with my niece Janis
And Look What the Future Hath Wroughtp. 153
Poem
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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