Catalogue


The role of domestic courts in treaty enforcement : a comparative study /
edited by David Sloss.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
xxix, 626 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780521877305 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
9780521877305 (hardback)
contents note
Does international law obligate states to open their national courts to persons for the invocation of treaty norms that protect or benefit persons? / Sean D. Murphy -- Australia / Donald R. Rothwell -- Canada / Gib Van Ert -- Germany / Andreas Paulus -- India / Nihal Jayawickrama -- Israel / David Kretzmer -- Netherlands / Andre Nollkaemper -- Poland / Lech Garlicki, Malgorzata Masternak-Kubiak and Krzysztof Wójtowicz -- Russia / William E. Butler -- South Africa / John Dugard -- United Kingdom / Anthony Aust -- United States / David Sloss -- The role of domestic courts in treaty enforcement : summary and conclusions / Michael P. Van Alstine.
catalogue key
6987656
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines whether domestic courts in 12 countries actually provide remedies to private parties who are harmed by a violation of their treaty-based rights.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the application of treaties by domestic courts in twelve countries. The central question is whether domestic courts actually provide remedies to private parties who are harmed by a violation of their treaty-based rights. The analysis shows that domestic courts in eight countries do enforce treaty-based rights, whereas the other four countries reveal mixed evidence.
Main Description
This book examines the application of treaties by domestic courts in twelve countries. The central question is whether domestic courts actually provide remedies to private parties who are harmed by a violation of their treaty-based rights. The analysis shows that domestic courts in eight of the twelve countries; Australia, Canada, Germany, India, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, and the United Kingdom; generally do enforce treaty-based rights on behalf of private parties. On the other hand, the evidence is mixed for the other four countries: China, Israel, Russia, and the United States. In China, Israel, and Russia, the trends are moving in the direction of greater judicial enforcement of treaties on behalf of private parties. The United States is the only country surveyed where the trend is moving in the opposite direction. U.S. courts' reluctance to enforce treaty-based rights undermines efforts to develop a more cooperative global order.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title examines whether domestic courts in 11 countries actually provide remedies to private parties who are harmed by a violation of their treaty-based rights.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Does international law obligate states to open their national courts to persons for the invocation of treaty norms that protect or benefit persons?
Australia
Canada
China
Germany
India
Israel
Netherlands
Poland
Russia
South Africa
United Kingdom
United States
The role of domestic courts in treaty enforcement: summary and conclusions
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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