Catalogue

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Ending British rule in Africa : writers in a common cause /
Carol Polsgrove.
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York, NY : Manchester University Press, 2009.
description
xviii, 186 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719077672 (hardback), 9780719077678 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York, NY : Manchester University Press, 2009.
isbn
0719077672 (hardback)
9780719077678 (hardback)
catalogue key
6987328
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Carol Polsgrove is Professor Emerita at the School of Journalism, Indiana University, Bloomington
Reviews
Review Quotes
" Ending British Rule in Africa is a path-breaking book. Polsgrove's excavation of one rich seam of the black presence in British print culture, and her exploration of some of the often underground networks of 'black internationalism' in and around the imperial metropole, is an important advance." As an inspirational account of the achievements of the Pan-Africanists around Padmore, it serves too as a reminder of the even deeper historical excavations needed to bring to light a host of lesser-known black anti-colonial thinkers and activists, of which at present we have only tantalising glimpses." -- History Workshop Journal "Excellent book...invaluable." -- Reviews in History "Provides valuable new information on the relationship between these writers, their diverging opinions, and the personal antagonisms that grew up between them over decades....As a journalist herself, Polsgrove pays attention to the practical details of relations between agents, publishers, and editors -- an aspect of writing that she notes is too often ignored in intellectual histories." -- The Journal of African History
'Excellent' and 'invaluable'.Marika Sherwood, Hon. Sr Research Fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
On the eve of World War II, a small, impoverished group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable: the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. West Indians George Padmore, C. L. R. James, and Ras Makonnen; Kenya's Jomo Kenyatta and Sierra Leone's I. T. A. Wallace Johnson - these were writers in a common cause: envisioning Africa freed of European rule. Joined by South African Peter Abrahams during the war and the Gold Coast's Kwame Nkrumah toward the war's end, the community expanded its reach through ties with Americans W. E. B. Du Bois and Richard Wright, Nigerian Nnamdi Azikiwe, and West Indians Eric Williams and Arthur Lewis - a powerful array of committed political intellectuals. Publishing in Britain, the United States, and across the colonial world, they built an international base of support. When British authorities banned and seized their publications in the colonies, they made their point: that colonial rule was oppressive and inconsistent with the democratic ideals Britain claimed at home. Ending British Rule in Africa draws on previously unexplored manuscript and archival collections to trace the development of this publishing community from its origins in George Padmore's American and Comintern years through the independence of Ghana in the 1957 - a case study of publishing's role in promoting political change. This book will be of interest to scholars and general readers interested in social movements, diaspora studies, empire and African history, publishing history, literary history, and cultural studies.
Back Cover Copy
On the eve of World War II, a small, impoverished group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable: the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. West Indians George Padmore, C. L. R. James, and Ras Makonnen; Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta and Sierra Leone’s I. T. A. Wallace Johnson – these were writers in a common cause: envisioning Africa freed of European rule. Joined by South African Peter Abrahams during the war and the Gold Coast’s Kwame Nkrumah toward the war’s end, the community expanded its reach through ties with Americans W. E. B. Du Bois and Richard Wright, Nigerian Nnamdi Azikiwe, and West Indians Eric Williams and Arthur Lewis – a powerful array of committed political intellectuals. Publishing in Britain, the United States, and across the colonial world, they built an international base of support. When British authorities banned and seized their publications in the colonies, they made their point: that colonial rule was oppressive and inconsistent with the democratic ideals Britain claimed at home. Ending British Rule in Africa draws on previously unexplored manuscript and archival collections to trace the development of this publishing community from its origins in George Padmore’s American and Comintern years through the independence of Ghana in the 1957 – a case study of publishing’s role in promoting political change. This book will be of interest to scholars and general readers interested in social movements, diaspora studies, empire and African history, publishing history, literary history, and cultural studies.
Bowker Data Service Summary
On the eve of WWII, a small group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable - the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. This book traces the development of this publishing community.
Description for Reader
On the eve of World War II, a small, impoverished group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable: the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. West Indians George Padmore, C. L. R. James, and Ras Makonnen; Kenya#146;s Jomo Kenyatta and Sierra Leone#146;s I. T. A. Wallace Johnson --made their point: that colonial rule was oppressive and inconsistent with the democratic ideals Britain claimed at home. Ending British Rule in Africa draws on previously unexplored manuscript and archival collections to trace the development of this publishing community from its origins in George Padmore#146;s American and Comintern years through the independence of Ghana in the 1957. This original study will be of interest to scholars and general readers interested in social movements, diaspora studies, empire and African history, publishing history, literary history, and cultural studies.
Main Description
On the eve of World War II, a small, impoverished group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable: the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. West Indians George Padmore, C. L. R. James, and Ras Makonnen; Kenya's Jomo Kenyatta and Sierra Leone's I. T. A. Wallace Johnson made their point: that colonial rule was oppressive and inconsistent with the democratic ideals Britain claimed at home. Ending British Rule in Africa draws on previously unexplored manuscript and archival collections to trace the development of this publishing community from its origins in George Padmore's American and Comintern years through the independence of Ghana in the 1957. This original study will be of interest to scholars and general readers interested in social movements, diaspora studies, empire and African history, publishing history, literary history, and cultural studies.
Main Description
On the eve of World War II, a small, impoverished group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable: the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. West Indians George Padmore, C. L. R. James, and Ras Makonnen; Kenya's Jomo Kenyatta and Sierra Leone's I. T. A. Wallace Johnson made their point: that colonial rule was oppressive and inconsistent with the democratic ideals Britain claimed at home.Ending British Rule in Africadraws on previously unexplored manuscript and archival collections to trace the development of this publishing community from its origins in George Padmore's American and Comintern years through the independence of Ghana in the 1957.This original study will be of interest to scholars and general readers interested in social movements, diaspora studies, empire and African history, publishing history, literary history, and cultural studies.
Main Description
On the eve of World War II, a small, impoverished group of Africans and West Indians in London dared to imagine the unimaginable: the end of British rule in Africa. In books, pamphlets, and periodicals, they launched an anti-colonial campaign that used publishing as a pathway to liberation. West Indians George Padmore, C. L. R. James, and Ras Makonnen; Kenya's jomo Kenyatta; and Sierra Leone's I.T.A. Wallace Johnson - these were writers in a common cause: envisioning Africa freed of foreign rule. Joined by South African Peter Abrahams during the war and the Gold Coast's Kwame Nkrumah toward the war's end, the community expanded its reach through ties with Americans W. E. B. Du Bois and Richard Wright, Nigerian Nnamdi Azikiwe, and West Indians Eric Williams and Arthur Lewis - a powerful array of committed political intellectuals. Publishing in Britain, the United States, and across the colonial world, they built an international base of support. When British authorities banned and seized their publications in the colonies, they made their point: that colonial rule was oppressive and inconsistent with the democratic ideals Britain claimed at home. Ending British Rule in Africa draws on previously unexplored manuscript and archival collections to trace the development of this publishing community from its origins in George Padmore's American and Comintern years through the independence of Ghana in the 1957 - a case study of publishing's role in promoting political change. This book will expand the horizons of scholars and general readers interested in social movements, diaspora studies, empire and African history, publishing history, literary history, and cultural studies. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
General editor's introductionp. ix
Prefacep. xi
List of abbreviationsp. xviii
'Misery laid bare'p. 1
'Generals without an army'p. 23
Writing while the bombs fallp. 53
'A constant stream'p. 75
Strategist, publicistp. 96
Acts of betrayalp. 118
Their own historiesp. 145
Select bibliographyp. 175
Indexp. 181
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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