Catalogue


Paradox and perception : measuring quality of life in Latin America /
Carol Graham and Eduardo Lora, editors.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Inter-American Development Bank/Brookings Institution Press, c2009.
description
xiii, 258 p.
ISBN
0815703260 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780815703266 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Inter-American Development Bank/Brookings Institution Press, c2009.
isbn
0815703260 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780815703266 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : how Latin Americans assess their quality of life : insights and puzzles from novel metrics of well-being / Carol Graham and Jere R. Behrman -- Objective and subjective deprivation / Leonardo Gasparini, Walter Sosa Escudero, Mariana Marchionni, and Sergio Olivieri -- The conflictive relationship between satisfaction and income / Eduardo Lora and Juan Camilo Chaparro -- Satisfaction beyond income / Eduardo Lora, Juan Camilo Chaparro and Maria Victoria Rodriguez -- Vulnerabilities and subjective well-being / Mauricio Cardenas -- Health perceptions and quality of life in Latin America / Carol Graham and Eduardo Lora -- Education and life satisfaction : perception or reality? / Mauricio Cardenas, Carolina Mejia, and Vincenzo Di Maro -- Job insecurity and life satisfaction / Naercio Aquino Menezes-Filho, Raphael Botura Corbi, and Andrea Zaitune Curi.
abstract
"Improves our understanding of the determinants of well-being in Latin America using a broad "quality-of-life" concept that challenges standard assumptions in economics, including those about the relationship between happiness and income. Builds upon new economic approaches related to the study of happiness, finding some paradoxes as respondents evaluate their well-being"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6986811
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Carol Graham is senior fellow and Charles Robinson Chair at the Brookings Institution and College Park Professor at the University of Maryland. She has also served as a special adviser to the executive vice president of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Eduardo Lora is general manager of the Research Department and chief economist at the IDB. He has been the executive director of Fedesarrollo, in Bogot, Colombia.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-04-01:
Economists' model of the rational utility maximizing individual is in disarray. In contrast, behavioral economics investigates how people actually make choices. At the national level, this involves asking citizens about their quality of life or factors that give them a sense of well-being. By 1974 economist Richard Easterlin had pointed out that greater income over time or across countries did not explain countries' relative happiness. It is now possible to study the factors that affect citizens' sense of their quality of life in much more detail and more systematically. One contributor is the Gallup World Poll, which is applied in more than 130 countries, including up to 25 Latin American countries, and which asks questions on happiness as well as a whole range of other issues. The eight chapters in this volume examine in depth the Gallup data for Latin America and the relation between peoples' sense of satisfaction and their income; their sense of vulnerability; and their perceptions of their health, education, and job insecurity. The relations are generally quite complex, and contributors to this work, primarily US and Latin America scholars, examine a number of "paradoxes" where objective and subjective measures of well-being do not correspond. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and all levels of researchers. K. P. Jameson University of Utah
Reviews
Review Quotes
"What determines life satisfaction beyond income is a fascinating topic that economists are just beginning to tackle seriously. This volume by Graham and Lora contains an excellent set of essays on this issue with specific reference to Latin America. Even those not specifically interested in Latin America but in the general issue of money and happiness will learn from it." --Alberto Alesina, Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economics, Harvard University
"As a practitioner of publicpolicymaking and politics for many years, I found this book extremely useful for betterunderstanding the public's often-unexpected reactions to specific policies and thesubjective factors that determine those reactions. Paradox andPerception is an outstanding contribution in the field of behavioraleconomics. A must read for policymakers in developing economies." ┬┐Alejandro Foxley,President, Cieplan, Chile; formerly Foreign Minister, Senator, and Minister of Finance ofChile
"Graham and Lora provide the definitive work on well-being in Latin America, and this book is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the economics, politics, and psychology of the region." --Edward Diener, Joseph Smiley Distinguished Professor of Psychology, University of Illinois
"As a practitioner of public policymaking and politics for many years, I found this book extremely useful for better understanding the public's often-unexpected reactions to specific policies and the subjective factors that determine those reactions. Paradox and Perception is an outstanding contribution in the field of behavioral economics. A must read for policymakers in developing economies." --Alejandro Foxley, President, Cieplan, Chile; formerly Foreign Minister, Senator, and Minister of Finance of Chile
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The "quality of life" concept of quality of life is a broad one. It incorporates basic needs but also extends beyond them to include capabilities, the "livability" of the environment, and life appreciation and happiness. Latin America's diversity in culture and levels of development provide a laboratory for studying how quality of life varies with a number of objective and subjective measures. These measures range from income levels to job insecurity and satisfaction, to schooling attainment and satisfaction, to measured and self-assessed health, among others.Paradox and Perception greatly improves our understanding of the determinants of well-being in Latin America based on a broad "quality of life" concept that challenges some standard assumptions in economics, including those about the relationship between happiness and income.The authors' analysis builds upon a number of new approaches in economics, particularly those related to the study of happiness and finds a number of paradoxes as the region's respondents evaluate their well-being. These include the paradox of unhappy growth at the macroeconomic level, happy peasants and frustrated achievers at the microlevel, and surprisingly high levels of satisfaction with public services among the region's poorest.They also have important substantive links with several of the region's realities, such as high levels of income inequality, volatile macroeconomic performance, and low expectations of public institutions and faith in the capacity of the state to deliver.Identifying these perceptions, paradoxes, and their causes will contribute to the crafting of better public policies, as well as to our understanding of why "populist" politics still pervade in much of the region.
Main Description
The "quality of life" concept of quality of life is a broad one. It incorporates basic needs but also extends beyond them to include capabilities, the "livability" of the environment, and life appreciation and happiness. Latin America's diversity in culture and levels of development provide a laboratory for studying how quality of life varies with a number of objective and subjective measures. These measures range from income levels to job insecurity and satisfaction, to schooling attainment and satisfaction, to measured and self-assessed health, among others. Paradox and Perception greatly improves our understanding of the determinants of well-being in Latin America based on a broad "quality of life" concept that challenges some standard assumptions in economics, including those about the relationship between happiness and income. The authors' analysis builds upon a number of new approaches in economics, particularly those related to the study of happiness and finds a number of paradoxes as the region's respondents evaluate their well-being. These include the paradox of unhappy growth at the macroeconomic level, happy peasants and frustrated achievers at the microlevel, and surprisingly high levels of satisfaction with public services among the region's poorest.They also have important substantive links with several of the region's realities, such as high levels of income inequality, volatile macroeconomic performance, and low expectations of public institutions and faith in the capacity of the state to deliver.Identifying these perceptions, paradoxes, and their causes will contribute to the crafting of better public policies, as well as to our understanding of why "populist" politics still pervade in much of the region.
Library of Congress Summary
"Improves our understanding of the determinants of well-being in Latin America using a broad "quality-of-life" concept that challenges standard assumptions in economics, including those about the relationship between happiness and income. Builds upon new economic approaches related to the study of happiness, finding some paradoxes as respondents evaluate their well-being"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
The quality of life concept of quality of life is a broad one. It incorporates basic needs but also extends beyond them to include capabilities, the livability of the environment, and life appreciation and happiness. Latin Americas diversity in culture and levels of development provide a laboratory for studying how quality of life varies with a number of objective and subjective measures. These measures range from income levels to job insecurity and satisfaction, to schooling attainment and satisfaction, to measured and self-assessed health, among others.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
How Latin Americans Assess Their Quality of Life: Insights and Puzzles from Novel Metrics of Well-Beingp. 1
Objective and Subjective Deprivationp. 22
The Conflictive Relationship between Satisfaction and Incomep. 57
Satisfaction beyond Incomep. 96
Vulnerabilities and Subjective Well-Beingp. 118
Health Perceptions and Quality of Life in Latin Americap. 158
Education and Life Satisfaction: Perception or Reality?p. 192
Job Insecurity and Life Satisfactionp. 227
Contributorsp. 149
Indexp. 251
List of Figures, Tables, and Boxes
Figures
Happiness and Income per Capita, 1990sp. 4
Current, Past, and Future Life Satisfactionp. 41
Growth of Gross Domestic Product per Capita by Region and Decade, 1981-2006p. 60
Gross Domestic Product per Capita by Region and Decade, 1981-2006p. 60
Growth of Gross Domestic Product per Capita, Average 2001-2006p. 61
Gross Domestic Product per Capita, Average 2001-2006p. 62
Perceptions of Satisfaction with Life and the Situation of the Countryp. 64
Perceptions of Personal Economic Situation and Economic Situation of the Countryp. 65
Perceptions of Own Health and National Health Systemp. 66
Perceptions of the Education Systemp. 67
Perceptions of Employment and Labor Public Policyp. 68
Perceptions of Own Housing and Housing Marketp. 69
Relation between GDP per Capita and Life Satisfaction, 122 Countriesp. 71
Relation between Economic Growth and Life Satisfaction, 120 Countriesp. 75
Life Satisfaction in Rich and Poor Countriesp. 99
Food Insecurity and per Capita Incomep. 107
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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