Catalogue


The other side of the fence : American migrants in Mexico /
Sheila Croucher.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2009.
description
ix, 243 p.
ISBN
0292719752 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780292719750 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Austin : University of Texas Press, 2009.
isbn
0292719752 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780292719750 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : reversing the lens -- Southern pulls and northern pushes -- High-tech migrants : technology and transterritoriality -- Waving the red, white, and azul : the transnational politics of Americans in Mexico -- "They love us here!" : privileged belonging in a global world -- Rethinking the fence.
catalogue key
6981916
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Author of Imagining Miami and Globalization and Belonging, Sheila Croucher is the Paul Rejai Professor of Political Science and American Studies at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-05-01:
With the clever title The Other Side of the Fence, Croucher (Miami Univ.) begins a highly readable and engaging analysis of US immigrants in Mexico, a new topic in scholarly literature. Although counting Americans in Mexico is problematic, the total is probably well over a million, and for Americans living abroad, Mexico is the top destination country. Using a comprehensive ethnographic research approach that includes 214 interviews and extensive participant observation, Croucher compares two communities in central Mexico: San Miguel de Allende and Ajijic, a village near Lake Chapala. In an illuminating conceptual section, she discusses possible terms for Americans who move to Mexico, from "expats" or "gringos" (what many Americans call themselves) to settlers, colonists, and immigrants. Creatively drawing from the voluminous studies about immigrants from southern countries that migrate northward to the US or Europe, Croucher includes interviews with questions about "push-pull" factors and identifies both economic and cultural factors. Yet few immigrants assimilate language or interact with Mexicans in their beloved new communities "beyond serving and being served." In illuminating chapters, Croucher analyzes "high-tech" migrants who maintain transnational connections (sometimes breaking laws) along with transnational politics through clubs like the Republicans Abroad and the Democrats Abroad. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. K. Staudt University of Texas at El Paso
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
A growing number of Americans, many of them retirees, are migrating to Mexico's beach resorts, border towns, and picturesque heartland. While considerable attention has been paid to Mexicans who immigrate to the U.S., the reverse scenario receives little scrutiny. Shifting the traditional lens of North American migration, The Other Side of the Fence takes a fascinating look at a demographic trend that presents significant implications for the United States and Mexico. The first in-depth account of this trend, Sheila Croucher's study describes the cultural, economic, and political lives of these migrants of privilege. Focusing primarily on two towns, San Miguel de Allende in the mountains and Ajijic along the shores of Lake Chapala, Croucher depicts the surprising similarities between immigrant populations on both sides of the border. Few Americans living in Mexico are fluent in the language of their new land, and most continue to practice the culture and celebrate the national holidays of their homeland, maintaining close political, economic, and social ties to the United States while making political demands on Mexico, where they reside. Accessible, timely, and brimming with eye-opening, often ironic, findings, The Other Side of the Fence brings an important perspective to borderlands debates.
Main Description
A growing number of Americans, many of them retirees, are migrating to Mexico's beach resorts, border towns, and picturesque heartland. While considerable attention has been paid to Mexicans who immigrate to the U.S., the reverse scenario receives little scrutiny. Shifting the traditional lens of North American migration, The Other Side of the Fencetakes a fascinating look at a demographic trend that presents significant implications for the United States and Mexico. The first in-depth account of this trend, Sheila Croucher's study describes the cultural, economic, and political lives of these migrants of privilege. Focusing primarily on two towns, San Miguel de Allende in the mountains and Ajijic along the shores of Lake Chapala, Croucher depicts the surprising similarities between immigrant populations on both sides of the border. Few Americans living in Mexico are fluent in the language of their new land, and most continue to practice the culture and celebrate the national holidays of their homeland, maintaining close political, economic, and social ties to the United States while making political demands on Mexico, where they reside. Accessible, timely, and brimming with eye-opening, often ironic, findings, The Other Side of the Fencebrings an important perspective to borderlands debates.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introduction: Reversing the Lensp. 1
Southern Pulls and Northern Pushesp. 27
High-Tech Migrants: Technology and Transterritorialityp. 76
Waving the Red, White, and Azul: The Transnational Politics of Americans in Mexicop. 108
"They Love Us Here!": Privileged Belonging in a Global Worldp. 136
Rethinking the Fencep. 175
Notesp. 209
Bibliographyp. 213
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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