Catalogue


Lewis Hine as social critic /
Kate Sampsell-Willmann ; foreword by Alan Trachtenberg.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2009.
description
xii, 331 p.
ISBN
1604733683 (cloth : alk. paper), 9781604733686 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2009.
isbn
1604733683 (cloth : alk. paper)
9781604733686 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Lewis Hine, Ellis Island, and pragmatism : photographs as lived experience -- Social testimony : Lewis Hine's expertise -- Lewis Hine and American economic life -- Between the wars : "the very best thing I have ever done--" -- Work portraits : Lewis Hine's apotheosis of labor -- "Investigation and research loomed large" : legacy of the human document.
catalogue key
6981891
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
A study of the great photographer as a progressive thinker and political activist
Summaries
Main Description
This is one of the first full-length examinations of Lewis W. Hine (1878-1940), the intellectual and aesthetic father of social documentary photography. Kate Sampsell-Willmann assesses Hine's output through the lens of his photographs, his political and philosophical ideologies, and his social and aesthetic commitments to the dignity of labor and workers.Using Hine's images, published articles, and private correspondence,Lewis Hine as Social Criticplaces the artist within the context of the Progressive Era and its associated movements and periodicals, such as the Works Progress Administration, Tennessee Valley Authority, the Chicago School of Social Work, and Rex Tugwell'sAmerican Economic Life and the Means of Its Improvement. This intellectual history, heavily illustrated with Hine's photography, compares his career and concerns with other prominent photographers of the day--Jacob Riis, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Margaret Bourke-White.Through detailed analysis of how Hine's images and texts intersected with concepts of urban history and social democracy, this volume reestablishes the artist's intellectual preeminence in the development of American photography as socially conscious art.
Main Description
This is the first full-length examination of Lewis W. Hine (1874-1940), the intellectual and aesthetic father of social documentary photography. Kate Sampsell-Willmann assesses Hine's output through the lens of his photographs, his political and philosophical ideologies, and his social and aesthetic commitments to the dignity of labor and workers.Using Hine's images, published articles, and private correspondence,Lewis Hine as Social Criticplaces the artist within the context of the Progressive Era and its associated movements and periodicals, such as the Works Progress Administration, Tennessee Valley Authority, the Chicago School of Social Work, and Rex Tugwell'sAmerican Economic Life and the Means of Its Improvement. This intellectual history, heavily illustrated with Hine's photography, compares his career and concerns with other prominent photographers of the day--Jacob Riis, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Margaret Bourke-White.Through detailed analysis of how Hine's images and texts intersected with concepts of urban history and social democracy, this volume reestablishes the artist's intellectual preeminence in the development of American photography as socially conscious art.
Main Description
This is the first full-length examination of Lewis H. Hine (1874-1940), the intellectual and aesthetic father of social documentary photography. Kate Sampsell-Willmann assesses Hine's output through the lens of his photographs, his political and philosophical ideologies, and his social and aesthetic commitments to the dignity of labor and workers.Using Hine's images, published articles, and private correspondence,Lewis Hine as Social Criticplaces the artist within the context of the Progressive Era and its associated movements and periodicals, such as the Works Progress Administration, Tennessee Valley Authority, the Chicago School of Social Work, and Rex Tugwell'sAmerican Economic Life and the Means of Its Improvement. This intellectual history, heavily illustrated with HIne's photography, compares his career and concerns with other prominent photographers of the day--Jacob Riis, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Margaret Bourke-White.Through detailed analysis of how Hine's images and texts intersected with concepts of urban history and social democracy, this volume reestablishes the artist's intellectual preeminence in the development of American photography as socially conscious art.
Main Description
This is the first full-length examination of Lewis H. Hine (1874-1940), the intellectual and aesthetic father of social documentary photography. Kate Sampsell-Willmann assesses Hine's output through the lens of his photographs, his political and philosophical ideologies, and his social and aesthetic commitments to the dignity of labor and workers. Using Hine's images, published articles, and private correspondence, Lewis Hine as Social Criticplaces the artist within the context of the Progressive Era and its associated movements and periodicals, such as the Works Progress Administration, Tennessee Valley Authority, the Chicago School of Social Work, and Rex Tugwell's American Economic Life and the Means of Its Improvement. This intellectual history, heavily illustrated with HIne's photography, compares his career and concerns with other prominent photographers of the day--Jacob Riis, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Margaret Bourke-White. Through detailed analysis of how Hine's images and texts intersected with concepts of urban history and social democracy, this volume reestablishes the artist's intellectual preeminence in the development of American photography as socially conscious art.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
Lewis Hine, Ellis Island, and Pragmatism: Photographs as Lived Experiencep. 22
Social Testimony: Lewis Hine's Expertisep. 56
Lewis Hine and American Economic Lifep. 97
Between the Wars: "The Very Best Thing I Have Ever Done..."p. 129
Work Portraits: Lewis Hine's Apotheosis of Laborp. 175
"Investigation and Research Loomed Large": Legacy of the Human Documentp. 210
Notesp. 265
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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