Catalogue


Dutch Jewry in a cultural maelstrom, 1880-1940 /
Judith Frishman and Hetty Berg, editors.
imprint
Amsterdam : Aksant, 2007.
description
213 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9052602689, 9789052602684
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Amsterdam : Aksant, 2007.
isbn
9052602689
9789052602684
contents note
The new "mosaik" : Jews and European culture, 1750-1940 / David Sorkin -- The politics of Jewish historiography / Michael Brenner -- "The first shall be the last" : the rise and development of modern Jewish historiography in the Netherlands until 1940 / Rena Fuks-Mansfeld -- Epigones and identity : Jewish scholarship in the Netherlands, 1850-1940 / Irene Zwiep -- Judaism on display : the origins of Amsterdam's Jewish Historical Museum / Julie-Marthe Cohen -- De vrijdagavond as a mirror of Dutch Jewry in the Interbellum, 1924-1932 / Judith Frishman -- "Holland is a country which provokes serious reflection--" : images of Dutch Jewry in the German Jewish press / Thomas Kollatz -- Spinozism and Dutch Jewry between 1880 and 1940 / Henri Krop -- Spinoza's popularity in perspective : a Dutch-German comparison / David Wertheim -- Mozes Salomon Polak : Jewish "Lerner" and propagator of freemasonry, spiritualism, and theosophy / Marty Bax -- Jewish women, philanthropy, and modernization : the changing roles of Jewish women in modern Europe, 1850-1939 / Susan L. Tananbaum -- Roosje Vos, Sani Prijes, Alida de Jong, and the others : Jewish women workers and the labor movement as a vehicle on the road to modernity / Karin Hofmeester -- Stemming the current : Dutch Jewish women and the first feminist movement / Marloes Schoonheim -- Dutch Jewish women : integration and modernity / Selma Leydesdorff.
catalogue key
6978264
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Not only the Jews but Dutch society at large was caught up in a cultural maelstrom in the years between 1880 and 1940. The question is whether or not the Jewish experience was unique. In failing to form a separate pillar in a period when various population groups were doing just that, the Jews were certainly unlike contemporary Catholics or Protestants. But were those involved in the socialist, labor and women's movements different from non-Jewish members of the same organizations? The traditional answer is that their high degree of assimilation made them indistinguishable. However, the authors in this volume suggest that the category of assimilation does not suffice to explain the attraction of Jews to these very movements and their disproportionate representation. In fact the Jews were not trying to gain entrance in a pre-existing culture but were involved with non-Jews in constructing a new culture. Thus the complexity of Dutch Jewish history once more becomes evident if not new. The authors whose essays are included in this volume have attempted firstly to go beyond the listing of demographic facts and convey the mentality of both Dutch Jews and non-Jews in the period at hand. The three more general essays included on Jews in European Culture, Jewish historiography in European context and the changing roles of Jewish women in modern Europe are intended to help the reader understand the Dutch (Jewish) situation in a broader and therefore even more complex context. All of the essays, general and specific, reflect and embellish upon the lectures presented during the conference on Dutch Jewry in a Cultural Maelstrom, 1880-1940 held in Amsterdam and organized by the Committee for the History and Culture of the Jews in the Netherlands of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences.
Main Description
Not only the Jews but Dutch society at large was caught up in a cultural maelstrom between 1880 and 1940. In failing to form a separate pillar in a period when various population groups were doing just that, the Jews were certainly unlike contemporary Catholics or Protestants. In fact, the Jews were not trying to gain entrance in a pre-existing culture but were involved with non-Jews in constructing a new culture. The complexity of Dutch Jewish history once again becomes evident if not new. Judith Frishman is professor in the Faculty of Catholic Theology of Tilburg University (the Netherlands). Hetty Berg is curator and museum affairs manager of the Jewish Historical Museum, Amsterdam (the Netherlands).
Main Description
Not only the Jews but Dutch society at large was caught up in a cultural maelstrom between 1880 and 1940. In failing to form a separate pillar in a period when various population groups were doing just that, the Jews were certainly unlike contemporary Catholics or Protestants. In fact, the Jews were not trying to gain entrance in a pre-existing culture but were involved with non-Jews in constructing a new culture. The complexity of Dutch Jewish history once again becomes evident if not new.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 7
The New "Mosaik". Jews and European Culture, 1750-1940p. 11
The Politics of Jewish Historiographyp. 31
"The First Shall Be the Last". The Fuse and Development of Modern Jewish Historiography in the Netherlands until 1940p. 43
Epigones and Identity. Jewish Scholarship in the Netherlands 1850-1940p. 53
Judaism on Display. The Origins of Amsterdam's Jewish Historical Museump. 67
De Vrijdagavond as a Mirror of Dutch Jewry in the Interbellum, 1924-1932p. 85
"Holland is a country which provokes serious reflection...". Images of Dutch Jewry in the German Jewish Pressp. 97
Spinozism and Dutch Jewry between 1880 and 1940p. 103
Spinoza's Popularity in Perspective. A Dutch-German Comparisonp. 121
Mozes Salomon Polak. Jewish "Lerner" and Propagator of Freemasonry, Spiritualism, and Theosophyp. 131
Jewish Women, Philanthropy, and Modernization. The Changing Roles of Jewish Women in Modern Europe, 1850-1939p. 139
Roosje Vos, Sani Prijes, Alida de Jong, and the others. Jewish Women Workers and the Labor Movement as a Vehicle on the Road to Modernityp. 155
Stemming the Current. Dutch Jewish Women and the First Feminist Movementp. 169
Dutch Jewish Women. Integration and Modernityp. 183
Index of names of personsp. 195
Index of subjectsp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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