Catalogue


Of apes and ancestors : evolution, Christianity, and the Oxford debate /
Ian Hesketh.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2009.
description
viii, 144 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802092845, 9780802092847
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2009.
isbn
0802092845
9780802092847
contents note
Introduction -- Charles Darwin: historian of natural history -- The struggles of Soapy Sam -- Thomas Henry Huxley and Richard Owen: or, Darwin's bulldog and the queer fish -- Joseph Dalton Hooker and the early history of a great friendship -- The Oxford debate -- Remembering the Oxford debate -- Epilogue: the history of the present.
catalogue key
6974543
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [129]-136) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Of Apes and Ancestorsexamines an event that has been widely mythologized in popular culture, one that has contemporary significance with regard to continuing tensions between Christian theology and Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. Ian Hesketh has written a commendable in-depth introduction to this famous controversy and offers original insights on the creation of the myths surrounding the Oxford debate.'
'Hesketh does an effective job of summarizing current historical thought on the Oxford debate. Of Apes and Ancestorsserves as a welcome primer.'
'Of Apes and Ancestorsis a thought-provoking account of the Oxford debate. It would be particularly valuable at the undergraduate level, where it would serve as an engaging introduction to Charles Darwin, his theory of evolution, and the controversy it created in mid-nineteenth-century England.'
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Summaries
Main Description
Tell me, sir, is it on your grandmother's or your grandfather's side that you are descended from an ape?In June of 1860, some of Britain's most influential scientific and religious authorities gathered in Oxford to hear a heated debate on the merits of Charles Darwin's recently published Origin of Species . The Bishop of Oxford, ?Soapy? Samuel Wilberforce, clashed swords with Darwin's most outspoken supporter, Thomas Henry Huxley. The latter's triumph, amid quips about apes and ancestry, has become a mythologized event, symbolizing the supposed war between science and Christianity. But did the debate really happen in this way?Of Apes and Ancestors argues that this one-dimensional interpretation was constructed and disseminated by Darwin's supporters, becoming an imagined victory in the struggle to overcome Anglican dogmatism. By reconstructing the Oxford debate and carefully considering the individual perspectives of the main participants, Ian Hesketh argues that personal jealousies and professional agendas played a formative role in shaping the response to Darwin's hypothesis, with religious anxieties overlapping with a whole host of other cultural and scientific considerations. An absorbing study, Of Apes and Ancestors sheds light on the origins of a debate that continues, unresolved, to this day.
Main Description
Tell me, sir, is it on your grandmother's or your grandfather's side that you are descended from an ape? In June of 1860, some of Britain's most influential scientific and religious authorities gathered in Oxford to hear a heated debate on the merits of Charles Darwin's recently published Origin of Species. The Bishop of Oxford, "Soapy" Samuel Wilberforce, clashed swords with Darwin's most outspoken supporter, Thomas Henry Huxley. The latter's triumph, amid quips about apes and ancestry, has become a mythologized event, symbolizing the supposed war between science and Christianity. But did the debate really happen in this way? Of Apes and Ancestors argues that this one-dimensional interpretation was constructed and disseminated by Darwin's supporters, becoming an imagined victory in the struggle to overcome Anglican dogmatism. By reconstructing the Oxford debate and carefully considering the individual perspectives of the main participants, Ian Hesketh argues that personal jealousies and professional agendas played a formative role in shaping the response to Darwin's hypothesis, with religious anxieties overlapping with a whole host of other cultural and scientific considerations. An absorbing study, Of Apes and Ancestorssheds light on the origins of a debate that continues, unresolved, to this day.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 3
Charles Darwin: Historian of Natural Historyp. 11
The Struggles of Soapy Samp. 30
Thomas Henry Huxley and Richard Owen; or, Darwin's Bulldog and the Queer Fishp. 47
Joseph Dalton Hooker and the Early History of a Great Friendshipp. 64
The Oxford Debatep. 76
Remembering the Oxford Debatep. 88
Epilogue: The History of the Presentp. 108
Notesp. 113
Bibliographyp. 129
Indexp. 137
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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