Catalogue


An American by degrees : the extraordinary lives of French ambassador Jules Jusserand /
Robert J. Young
imprint
Montréal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2009
description
xxv, 327 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm
ISBN
0773535721, 9780773535725
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montréal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2009
isbn
0773535721
9780773535725
catalogue key
6973751
 
Includes bibliographical references and index
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this well-crafted and highly readable book, Robert Young has very much succeeded in resurrecting the life and reputation of Jules Jusserand. This sympathetic but by no means uncritical biography fully illustrates Jusserand's prodigious talents as a scholar and a diplomat while also highlighting his role in shaping French-American relations in the years when the United States emerged as a world power and when France suffered its first crushing blow of the twentieth century." Diane N. Labrosse, National Security Archive
"Robert J. Young has produced a brilliant biography [...] It is appropriate that the life of Jusserand -- this most scholarly and literate of diplomats -- is recounted by Young, who has performed his task with consummate literary skill and in accordance with the highest standards of scholarship.' Winnipeg Free Press
"Young's book skillfully weaves Jusserand's life and career into a series of unusually well-told stories. (...) Young's book, eminently readable, succeeds so well because it is a biography of a truly remarkable man; it is also a work of high scholarship. It should be of captivating interest to the members of The American Society of the French Legion of Honor." American Society of the French Legion of Honor
"Young's treatment of the subtle but skillful efforts of Jusserand to nudge the Wilson administration into supporting the French cause during the Great War is a first-rate piece of analysis, as is his analysis of the deterioration of relations between the two countries following the war. An American by Degrees as an evocative tableau of a bygone era should be of interest to a wide range of scholars on both sides of the Atlantic."William R. Keylor, International History Institute, Boston University
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The ambassador Jules Jusserand provided a vital link between France and the United States before, during and after the First World War. This biography is a personal and cultural portrait of Jusserand's career.
Main Description
In An American by Degrees Robert Young explores Ambassador Jusserand's life and legacy. Fluent in English, married to an American, and a historian who was a frequent guest at many American universities, Jusserand deftly cultivated American sympathies for France. His tasks as a diplomat were formidable, whether during the period of America's war-time neutrality - when France was nearly over-run by the German army - or when as allies they competed for control of the peace process or sought to resolve post-war issues like disarmament, war debts, and reparations. Jusserand relentlessly reminded Americans that France had been an ally during their Revolution and that their concept of "civilization" was part of France's intellectual and cultural legacy. His emphasis on their shared history was natural, as befitted the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History and only the second foreigner to serve as president of the American Historical Association.
Main Description
The expressions of American hostility toward France after 9/11 are not new - Franco-American relations in the early twentieth century were also difficult, characterized by the same antagonistic depictions of the other's culture. Ambassador Jules Jusserand's years in Washington (1903-24) were defined by efforts to correct such misconceptions, whether they came from the venomous pens of French extremists or from members of William Randolph Hearst's press empire. In An American by Degrees Robert Young explores Ambassador Jusserand's life and legacy. Fluent in English, married to an American, and a historian who was a frequent guest at many American universities, Jusserand deftly cultivated American sympathies for France. His tasks as a diplomat were formidable, whether during the period of America's war-time neutrality - when France was nearly over-run by the German army - or when as allies they competed for control of the peace process or sought to resolve post-war issues like disarmament, war debts, and reparations. Jusserand relentlessly reminded Americans that France had been an ally during their Revolution and that their concept of "civilization" was part of France's intellectual and cultural legacy. His emphasis on their shared history was natural, as befitted the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History and only the second foreigner to serve as president of the American Historical Association.
Main Description
The expressions of American hostility toward France after 9/11 are not new - Franco-American relations in the early twentieth century were also difficult, characterized by the same antagonistic depictions of the other's culture. Ambassador Jules Jusserand's years in Washington (1903-24) were defined by efforts to correct such misconceptions, whether they came from the venomous pens of French extremists or from members of William Randolph Hearst_s press empire. InAn American by DegreesRobert Young explores Ambassador Jusserand's life and legacy. Fluent in English, married to an American, and a historian who was a frequent guest at many American universities, Jusserand deftly cultivated American sympathies for France. His tasks as a diplomat were formidable, whether during the period of America's war-time neutrality - when France was nearly over-run by the German army - or when as allies they competed for control of the peace process or sought to resolve post-war issues like disarmament, war debts, and reparations. Jusserand relentlessly reminded Americans that France had been an ally during their Revolution and that their concept of "civilization" was part of France's intellectual and cultural legacy. His emphasis on their shared history was natural, As befitted the first winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History and only the second foreigner to serve as president of the American Historical Association.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Introduction and Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Genesis (1855-1903)p. 3
Debutant to Doyen (1903-1913)p. 34
Cautious Seduction (1914-1917)p. 68
Hesitant Embrace (1917-1918)p. 99
Old Arguments, New Quarrels (1919-1921)p. 129
The Impassable Road to Separation (1921-1924)p. 163
Creation and Remembrancep. 202
Conclusionp. 228
Notes and Abbreviationsp. 241
Source Materialsp. 295
Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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