Catalogue


Living with hearing difficulties : the process of enablement /
Dafydd Stephens, Sophia E. Kramer.
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
description
xii, 240 p.
ISBN
0470019859 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780470019856 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
isbn
0470019859 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780470019856 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Seeking help -- Types of hearing impairment and their consequences -- The influence of other factors on assessment and goals of enablement -- Communication -- Social and emotional aspects of hearing impairment -- Hearing impairment in the family -- The process of enablement at work -- Leisure and the wider social environment -- The process of enablement 1 : evaluation and decision making -- The process of enablement 2 : short-term remediation -- Enablement 3 : ongoing remediation and outcome assessment.
catalogue key
6972347
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Dafydd Stephens FRCP, is Honorary Professor of Audiological Medicine at Cardiff University, Wales, UK. Sophia E. Kramer PhD, is Senior Researcher and Psychologist at the Department of E.N.T./Audiology/EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research at the VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
'Living with Hearing Difficulties' is a source-book for professionals who encounter and support individuals with hearing difficulties. It will also be of interest to people with hearing difficulties themselves and those close to them. The book highlights the concept of audiological enablement as being an interactive process requiring the active involvement of both clinician and patient. The thirteen chapters encompass four sections which broadly follow the categories of the World Health Organization's ICF (2001): Section 1 addresses types of hearing disorders, the impairments they cause and also the process of help seeking. Section 2 deals with the effects of hearing impairment on communication and psychosocial functioning. Section 3 considers the individual in their environment; their family, work, and leisure. Section 4 elaborates on the process of enablement in a non-prescriptive manner. The authors approach the problems and needs from the standpoint of what the patient/client is seeking. Enablement is seen as a team effort between the professionals, the patient and their family in an ever-changing environment. This entails using any relevant techniques to ensure the well-being of the individual with hearing impairment; that end remains very much their goal. The book also has a companion website www.wiley.com/go/stephens which hosts additional downloadable documents as well as a demonstration of the concept of the signal-to-noise ratio.
Main Description
Living with Hearing Difficulties is a source-book for professionals who encounter and support individuals with hearing difficulties. It will also be of interest to people with hearing difficulties themselves and those close to them. The book highlights the concept of audiological enablement as being an interactive process requiring the active involvement of both clinician and patient. The thirteen chapters encompass four sections which broadly follow the categories of the World Health Organization's ICF (2001): Section 1 addresses types of hearing disorders, the impairments they cause and also the process of help seeking. Section 2 deals with the effects of hearing impairment on communication and psychosocial functioning. Section 3 considers the individual in their environment; their family, work, and leisure. Section 4 elaborates on the process of enablement in a non-prescriptive manner. The authors approach the problems and needs from the standpoint of what the patient/client is seeking. Enablement is seen as a team effort between the professionals, the patient and their family in an ever-changing environment. This entails using any relevant techniques to ensure the well-being of the individual with hearing impairment; that end remains very much their goal. The book also has a companion website www.wiley.com/go/stephens which hosts additional downloadable documents as well as a demonstration of the concept of the signal-to-noise ratio.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. viii
Prefacep. x
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
The need for this bookp. 1
Terminologyp. 2
Layout of the bookp. 4
The World Health Organization classificationsp. 5
Theoretical/management models in the general rehabilitation literaturep. 8
Models of audiological enablementp. 11
The Goldstein-Stephens modelp. 13
The role of positive experiences associated with hearing impairmentp. 19
Relevant measures in assessing patients' needs and the outcomes of interventionsp. 21
Development of a preliminary model appropriate to hearing impairmentp. 24
Conclusionp. 25
Seeking helpp. 26
Introductionp. 26
Becoming aware of hearing difficultiesp. 27
The decision to seek helpp. 31
Referral for hearing helpp. 36
Ethics/philosophy of adult screeningp. 38
Conclusionp. 42
Types of hearing impairment and their consequencesp. 43
Introductionp. 43
Basic anatomy and physiology and their implicationsp. 43
Purposes and process of assessmentp. 47
Types of hearing impairment and their consequencesp. 50
Severity of hearing impairmentp. 54
Unilateral/asymmetrical hearing impairmentp. 55
Age of onsetp. 55
Genetic issuesp. 57
Progressive/sudden onsetp. 58
Conclusionp. 58
The influence of other factors on assessment and goals of enablementp. 60
Introductionp. 60
Auditory symptomsp. 60
General aural symptomsp. 63
Visionp. 66
Cognitive and intellectual factorsp. 67
Neuromusculoskeletal problemsp. 68
Conclusionp. 69
Communicationp. 71
Introductionp. 71
Ecological audiologyp. 71
Ramsdell's classificationp. 73
Attitudes of the Deafp. 81
Conclusionp. 82
Social and emotional aspects of hearing impairmentp. 83
Introductionp. 83
Participation in lifep. 83
Psychosocial dysfunctionp. 84
Psychosocial consequences of Deafnessp. 90
Demographic factorsp. 91
Conclusionp. 94
Hearing impairment in the familyp. 96
Introductionp. 96
Impact of hearing impairment on significant othersp. 96
Coping strategiesp. 98
Inclusion of significant others in enablement programmesp. 100
Hearing impairment arising from genetic causes or with a familial basisp. 100
Impact of having a family history of hearing impairmentp. 102
Discussionp. 107
Conclusionp. 108
The process of enablement at workp. 109
Introductionp. 109
Statisticsp. 109
Impact of hearing impairment on occupational performancep. 110
Impact of work-related hearing impairment on significant othersp. 113
Vocational enablementp. 114
Vocational Enablement Protocol (VEP)p. 115
Discussionp. 120
Conclusionp. 121
Leisure and the wider social environmentp. 122
Introductionp. 122
Prevalencep. 122
Solitary versus interactive pastimesp. 123
The role of leisurep. 123
Opportunities for entertainment and leisurep. 124
Community lifep. 125
Recreation and leisurep. 126
Religion and spiritualityp. 131
Human rights, political life and citizenshipp. 132
Conclusionp. 133
The process of enablement 1: Evaluation and decision-makingp. 134
Introductionp. 134
The evaluation processp. 134
Integration and decision-makingp. 156
Conclusionp. 159
The process of enablement 2: Short-term remediationp. 160
Introductionp. 160
Instrumentationp. 160
Strategyp. 174
Ancillary helpp. 178
Conclusionp. 180
Enablement 3: Ongoing remediation and outcome assessmentp. 181
Ongoing remediationp. 181
Effectiveness of group programmesp. 194
Outcome assessmentp. 196
Conclusionp. 201
Overall conclusionsp. 202
Appendix: Longitudinal changes in enablement needs of older people with hearing impairmentp. 205
Referencesp. 209
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem