Catalogue


Japan and the specter of imperialism /
Mark Anderson.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
description
ix, 254 p.
ISBN
0230619223 (alk. paper), 9780230619227 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
isbn
0230619223 (alk. paper)
9780230619227 (alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: The Ansei treaties and the specter of imperialism -- John Luther Long's Madame Butterfly and imperial domesticity -- The science of making men : moral fitness for global competition -- Imperial aesthetics and the state in Meiji Japan -- Aesthetics and the moral capital of the family state -- Governmentality and melodramatic resistance in Ozaki Koyo's Konjiki yasha (The gold demon) -- Haga Yaichi's institution of classical Japanese literature : national community, governmentality, and colonial domesticity.
catalogue key
6972334
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark Anderson is Assistant Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where he teaches courses on Japanese film and cultural studies. He received his Ph.D. on East Asian Literature from Cornell University.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This study of the relation between the national and the modern in 'Ansei-treaty era Japan' is a bracing revision of late nineteenth-century intellectual history...This illuminating book not only criticizes the field but does something about it." Journal of Japanese Studies "Drawing heavily on analysis from post-colonial studies, Japan and the Specter of Imperialism gives a novel account of the relationship between Western imperialism and the spaces of Japanese national political cultures. The strength of this work lies in its analysis of the debates on what constituted a nation. These debates raged across a broad set of disciplines (literature, philosophy, social sciences, art, ethics), colonizing the imagination via the production of knowledge about history, peoples and places, whilst simultaneously contributing to the formation of an oppressive and territorially aggressive Japanese nation-state." Journal of Asian Studies
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A cross-disciplinary study that offers a new Foucauldian perspective on nineteenth century Japan and multinational issues relating to law, literature, intellectual history, economics and art history
Long Description
Japan and the Specter of Imperialism examines competing Japanese responses to the late nineteenth century unequal treaty regime as a confrontation with liberal imperialism, including the culture and gender politics of U.S. territorial expansion into the Pacific. The book examines how both the unequal treaties and Japanese legal reform served to impose and then incorporate the logic of market capitalism within a distinctly Japanese social order. It reveals that competing concepts of domesticity in figured centrally in naturalizing capitalism in Japan and rationalizing Japan's own expansion. The unequal treaty regime is situated as a precursor of contemporary neoliberal practices such as economic development zones and U.S. status of forces agreements.
Main Description
Japan and the Specter of Imperialismexamines competing Japanese responses to the late nineteenth century unequal treaty regime as a confrontation with liberal imperialism, including the culture and gender politics of U.S. territorial expansion into the Pacific. The book examines how both the unequal treaties and Japanese legal reform served to impose and then incorporate the logic of market capitalism within a distinctly Japanese social order. It reveals that competing concepts of domesticity figured centrally in naturalizing capitalism in Japan and rationalizing Japan's own expansion. The unequal treaty regime is situated as a precursor of contemporary neoliberal practices such as economic development zones and U.S. status of forces agreements.
Main Description
Japan and the Specter of Imperialism examines competing Japanese responses to the late nineteenth century unequal treaty regime as a confrontation with liberal imperialism, including the culture and gender politics of U.S. territorial expansion into the Pacific.
Main Description
Japan and the Specter of Imperialism examines competing Japanese responses to the late nineteenth century unequal treaty regime as a confrontation with liberal imperialism, including the culture and gender politics of U.S. territorial expansion into the Pacific. The book examines how both the unequal treaties and Japanese legal reform served to impose and then incorporate the logic of market capitalism within a distinctly Japanese social order. It reveals that competing concepts of domesticity figured centrally in naturalizing capitalism in Japan and rationalizing Japan's own expansion. The unequal treaty regime is situated as a precursor of contemporary neoliberal practices such as economic development zones and U.S. status of forces agreements.
Main Description
Japan and the Specter of Imperialismexamines competing Japanese responses to the late nineteenth century unequal treaty regime as a confrontation with liberal imperialism, including the culture and gender politics of U.S. territorial expansion into the Pacific. The book examines how both the unequal treaties and Japanese legal reform served to impose and then incorporate the logic of market capitalism within a distinctly Japanese social order. It reveals that competing concepts of domesticity in figured centrally in naturalizing capitalism in Japan and rationalizing Japan's own expansion. The unequal treaty regime is situated as a precursor of contemporary neoliberal practices such as economic development zones and U.S. status of forces agreements.
Main Description
Japan and the Specter of Imperialism examines competing Japanese responses to the late nineteenth century unequal treaty regime as a confrontation with liberal imperialism, including the culture and gender politics of U.S. territorial expansion into the Pacific. The book examines how both the unequal treaties and Japanese legal reform served to impose and then incorporate the logic of market capitalism within a distinctly Japanese social order. It reveals that competing concepts of domesticity figured centrally in naturalizingcapitalism in Japan and rationalizing Japan's own expansion. The unequal treaty regime is situated as a precursor of contemporary neoliberal practices such as economic development zones and U.S. status of forces agreements.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: The Ansei Treaties and the Specter of Imperialismp. 1
John Luther Long's Madame Butterfly and Imperial Domesticityp. 15
The Science of Making Men: Moral Fitness for Global Competitionp. 47
Imperial Aesthetics and the State in Meiji Japanp. 71
Aesthetics and the Moral Capital of the Family Statep. 97
Capitalist Govern mentality and Melodramatic Resistance in Ozaki Kôyô'sp. 121
Haga Yaichi's Institution of Classical Japanese Literature: Civilizing Japan, Governmentality, and Imperial Domesticityp. 153
Epiloguep. 181
Notesp. 193
Bibliographyp. 231
Indexp. 245
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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